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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has added a link to a translation service developed by Microsoft Inc., entitled Bing Translator, as a convenience to visitors to the DEC website who speak languages other than English.

Additional information can be found at DEC's Language Assistance Page.

About The EAGLES Modules

Who Am I?

Who Am I? is one of the environmental learning modules of the EAGLES education program offered by DEC and the New York Conservation Police Officers Association.

Who Am I?

The Environmental Conservation Police Officer(ECO) is in the forefront of New York's effort to clean our air and water, save our wilderness, protect our wildlife and make the environment a better place for us all now and for future generations. ECOs are uniformed police officers with statewide jurisdiction to enforce all New York State laws.

Role of the Environmental Conservation Police Officer (ECO): As the uniformed law enforcement representative of the Department of Environmental Conservation, the ECO is responsible for the enforcement of environmental laws and regulations of New York and for the detection and investigation of suspected violations.

Eagles Aloft

Eagles Aloft is one of the environmental learning modules of the EAGLES education program offered by DEC and the New York Conservation Police Officers Association.

Eagles Aloft

Bald eagles can live for 30 years and a pair mates for life. New York is a favored nesting and wintering area for bald eagles. These majestic birds weigh 8 to 14 pounds, with the larger eagles being females. Wingspans are 72-84 inches. Eagles return to their nests and add to them every year. Some bald eagle nests weigh over 2,000 pounds. Today there are approximately forty bald eagle nest sites in the state.

Role of the Environmental Conservation Police Officer (ECO): The Environmental Conservation Police Officer protects endangered or threatened species of wildlife and plants. A person convicted of taking a protected species like an eagle can be fined up to $5,000.

Endangered Species

Endangered Species is one of the environmental learning modules of the EAGLES education program offered by DEC and the New York Conservation Officers Association.

Endangered Species

Endangered means there is still time. Most species become endangered by the loss of their habitat. Each species on New York's endangered list is in imminent danger of disappearing from the state. DEC works to protect endangered species that are still living in the state and to restore some species that have disappeared. You can get a list of endangered, threatened and species of special concern from your local DEC office or on this web site.

Role of the Environmental Conservation Police Officer (ECO): ECO's check pet shops and stores for the illegal sale of protected animals, plants and wildlife products, such as the ivory carvings shown in the photo on the left. ECO's also help monitor populations of endangered animals throughout New York State.

Wonderful Wetlands

Wonderful Wetlands is one of the environmental learning modules of the EAGLES education program offered by DEC and the New York Conservation Police Officers Association.

Wonderful Wetlands

Freshwater and tidal wetlands are inportant because they: Improve Water Quality: Wetlands trap sediments, remove excess nutrients, and detoxify chemicals in the water. Protect Against Floods: Wetlands act like sponges by absorbing water and releasing it during dry time. Stabilize Shorelines: The massive root systems of wetland plants help hold the shoreline together. Provide Habitat: Wetlands offer food, shelter and living space for fish and wildlife.

Role of the Environmental Conservation Police Officer (ECO): ECOs protect wetlands by enforcing wetland laws. The law protects a 100 foot buffer zone around a freshwater wetland and 300 feet around a tidal wetland. Permits are required to conduct certain activities, such as building a house or a deck or filling in the wetland.

Wildlife Forever

Wildlife Forever is one of the environmental learning modules of the EAGLES education program offered by DEC and the New York Conservation Police Officers Association.

Wildlife Forever

White-tailed deer, beaver, coyote, fisher, marten and many other species of Wildlife are monitored throughout New York State to protect wildlife populations. Some species are legally removed from the wild by hunting and trapping. The Department of Environmental Conservation gathers information about animals provided by hunters and trappers to learn more about wildlife populations and helps to manage them.

Role of the Environmental Conservation Police Officer (ECO): ECOs make sure that hunters and trappers comply with the laws and regulations. They check that people fill out a report card when taking certain animals and send the information to DEC, which monitors the populations of species being removed from the wild.

Something Fishy

Something Fishy is one of the environmental learning modules of the EAGLES education program offered by DEC and the New York Conservation Police Officers Association.

Something Fishy

New York State has a great diversity of fish in its streams, lakes and ocean waters. The abundance of both fresh and saltwater species allows for commercial and sport fishing. To protect populations of certain fish, commercial and recreational fishermen must follow season, size and quantity limits. Fish need a clean place to live just like people. You can help by picking up trash along stream banks, lake shores and ocean beaches. Be careful not to pollute - clean water is essential.

Role of the Environmental Conservation Police Officer (ECO): The Environmental Conservation Police Officer protects the environment and natural resources. Among these natural resources are the fish of New York State. ECOs routinely check for fishing licenses, legal bait, correct equipment, and the size and quantity of protected fish that are caught.


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