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Question 2 - Impact on Geological Features - Full EAF (Part 2)

Full Environmental Assessment Form (FEAF)

The proposed action may result in the modification or destruction of, or inhibit access to, any unique or unusual land forms on the site (e.g., cliffs, dunes, minerals, fossils, caves).

This question asks the reviewing agency to evaluate potential impacts to unique or unusual land forms, and National Natural Landmarks. This includes any alteration to the landform itself, or a change in access to the landform.

To answer this question

Review Part 1 questions E.2.g. and E.3.c.

If the proposed project site does not contain nor is it adjacent to any unique geologic features or National Natural Landmarks, then check 'No' and move on to question 3. If the proposed project site does contain any of these features, or is adjacent to a National Natural Landmark, check 'Yes' and answer sub-questions (a) through (c).

Identifying potential impacts

The reviewing agency should evaluate the following sub-questions and decide if there will be any impact. If there will be an impact, the reviewing agency must then evaluate the magnitude of that impact, and decide if the impact will be small or moderate to large. This will depend on the overall scale and context of the proposed project as described in the Introduction to Part 2. The reviewing agency should be reasonable when conducting this review.

  • If the proposed project exceeds a numeric threshold in a question, it is presumed to be a moderate to large impact.
  • If the proposed project does not exceed a numeric threshold in a question, the reviewing agency should consider the scale and context of the project in determining if an impact may be small or moderate to large.
  • These sub-questions are not meant to be exhaustive. The reviewing agency should use the "Other impacts:" sub-question to include any additional elements they feel need to be analyzed for potential impacts.

a. Identify the specific land form(s) attached:

A gorge with waterfalls and a stone bridge in Watkins Glen
Watkins Glen

The NYS Unique Geologic Landforms project is a joint venture between the NYS DEC and the New York State Museum - Office of the State Geologist. This project identifies and inventories over 600 New York State unique land formations such as cliffs, dunes, waterfalls, erratic rocks, gorges, glacial features, and caves. These unique resources provide a variety of benefits to the community. They can provide learning opportunities for geologists and other scientists, habitats for rare animal and plant species, and recreational opportunities for the public.

Applicable Part 1 Information

E.2.g.

Analysis

  • Are there any land formations on the project site that are listed in the NYS DEC and State Geologist's database?
  • What is the basis for the feature's inclusion in the list?
    • What is it that makes it unique?
  • Are there any locally designated or officially recognized unique landforms or geologic features on the site?
    • Examples of these might be features or locations listed in a municipal comprehensive plan or open space plan.
  • Does the proposed project make any physical alterations to any of these landforms?
  • Is the feature currently publicly accessible, either physically, or visually?
  • Will the proposed project cause any change in access to the unique land form?

Will there be an impact?

If there are no unique landforms located on the project site, check 'no, or small impact may occur'.

Small Impact:

Examples of small impacts would be:

  • Land forms are located on the project site but the project will not affect the reason the feature was included in the database.
    • The proposed project will not affect the "setting" of the feature.
  • There will only be a temporary limitation of access to the feature during the construction phase.
Moderate to Large Impact:

Projects may have moderate to large impacts if:

  • There will be a severe limitation or elimination of access to the site containing the feature.
  • There will be alteration to physical aspects of the feature in any way.
  • The setting of the feature will be physically altered, or new structures will affect the aesthetic character and setting of the feature.

b. The proposed action may affect or is adjacent to a geological feature listed as a registered National Natural Landmark. Specific feature:

The National Natural Landmarks (NNL) Program recognizes and encourages the conservation of sites that contain outstanding biological and geological resources. NNLs are designated by the Secretary of the Interior to recognize some of the best examples of these resources in the nation. Some NNLs are the best remaining examples of a type of feature in the country and sometimes in the world. NNL designation does not impose any new land use restrictions that were not in effect before the designation.

Applicable Part 1 Information

E.3.c.

Analysis

  • Are there any National Natural Landmarks on or adjacent to the project site?
  • What are the reasons for this feature being registered in the NNL?
  • Does the proposed project make any alterations to the physical characteristics of a NNL?
  • Is the NNL currently publicly accessible, either physically, or visually?
  • Does the proposed project site currently provide physical or visual access to the NNL, even if it is located on an adjacent property?
  • Will the proposed project cause any change in physical or visual access to the NNL?

Will there be an impact?

If there are no NNLs on or adjacent to the project site, check 'no, or small impact may occur'.

Small Impact:

Temporary disturbances that are limited in size are likely to have only a small impact. Examples would be:

  • Land forms are located on the project site but the project will not affect the reason the feature was included in the database.
    • There will be no effect on the "setting" of the feature.
  • There will only be temporary limitation of access during the construction phase.
Moderate to Large Impact:

Examples of potential moderate to large impacts may be:

  • Severe limitation or elimination of access to the site containing the feature.
  • Alteration of physical aspects of the feature in any way.
  • The project will affect the "setting" of the feature, including the aesthetic characteristics.
  • The project removes or obstructs the physical structure of the NNL so that it no longer meets the original criteria upon which the features was designated a NNL.

c. Other impacts:

There may be other impacts identified by the reviewing agency that are not addressed by the above questions. If so, they should be identified and briefly described here. Some proposed actions may have beneficial impacts on the environment. The reviewing agency can use the 'other' category for that purpose, too.

Back to Part 2 (FEAF) Identification of Potential Project Impacts || Continue to Part 2 (FEAF) Question 3 Impacts on Surface Water


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