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Q. 15, Short EAF (Part 1) Endangered / Threatened Species

Short Environmental Assessment Form Workbook

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Does the site of the proposed action contain any species of animal, or associated habitats, listed by the State or Federal government as threatened or endangered?

Background Information

Threatened and endangered species are protected by both State (6NYCRR Part 182 and ECL 11-0535) and federal laws. These species, along with the habitats that support them are considered sensitive resources. This question asks the applicant to identify whether any threatened or endangered species (animals) and their associated habitats are present on the project site.

Answering the Question

The answer to this question will be automatically inserted on the pdf generated by the EAF Mapper. If endangered or threatened species or their associated habitats are known to be within the boundaries of, or close to, the project site, the EAF Mapper will check "yes" on a PDF of the SEAF. Note - because animals are transient, in addition to reporting a "Yes" when the site is known to contain a listed species, the mapper will also report a "Yes" if the site is close to a known species occurrence. The buffer area that the mapper uses to determine closeness varies by species. If 'yes' is returned for Question 15, the EAF Mapper will add in the common names of the threatened and endangered species. A 'yes' answer by the EAF Mapper should be considered as an initial screening, to be supplemented by more details about the species and its habitat on the project site.

  • If the EAF Mapper reports any animals, contact the appropriate NYSDEC Regional office for information about any permit considerations for the project and about potential impacts of the project on these species.

In addition, information on protected species is available on the Department's website through the Environmental Resource Mapper web application. The Environmental Resource Mapper highlights areas of concern in the vicinity of documented locations of rare plants and rare animals, both protected (listed) species and unlisted rare species; in some cases, it will provide the specific identity of the species. Regardless of the results of the Environmental Resource Mapper, if the EAF Mapper lists a threatened or endangered animal in or near a project site, contact the appropriate NYSDEC Regional office (no need to contact NY Natural Heritage). If the EAF Mapper does not list threatened or endangered animals, and the Environmental Resource Mapper indicates rare plants or animals in the vicinity of a project site, a request may be submitted to NY Natural Heritage for a more detailed screening. Instructions for making requests by mail, e-mail, or online form can be found on the NY Natural Heritage web page.

If the applicant or project sponsor believes the answer filled out by the EAF Mapper is incorrect, supplemental information should be provided to the reviewing agency that explains that discrepancy.

If there are no known endangered or threatened species or associated habitats located within, or close to, the project boundary, the EAF Mapper will check "no" on the form for you.

If the EAF Mapper is not used to answer this question, it does not mean that answering the question requires completion of a site-specific wildlife or plant inventory. There are other sources of already available information that you can access to find out whether any threatened or endangered species and their habitats are found on your project site. One such resource is the Environmental Resource Mapper, accessed on the DEC website and described above.

If the Environmental Resource Mapper reports state-listed animals in the vicinity of a project site, contact the appropriate NYSDEC Regional office for a more detailed screening and information about potential impacts of the project on those species and any permit considerations. If the Environmental Resource Mapper reports "Rare Animals" or unlisted animals, a request may be submitted to NY Natural Heritage for a more detailed screening. Instructions for making requests by mail, e-mail, or online form can be found on the NY Natural Heritage web page.

Note that the locations displayed in the Environmental Resource Mapper, or reported by NY Natural Heritage, are not the only places in New York with protected species; they are only the places documented in the New York Natural Heritage Program's Biodiversity Database. Not all of New York has been surveyed, so if no locations of endangered and threatened species are documented from the project site, it does not mean that none are there. It only means NY Natural Heritage has no information about the area. Depending on the nature of the project and the conditions at the project site, further information from on-site surveys or other resources may be required to fully assess the presence of threatened or endangered animals.

You may also find that information on endangered and threatened species has already been collected for the municipality. Contact the town/city/village clerk to find out if a local comprehensive plan, open space plan, or wildlife and plant inventory has already developed for the area. Often, these documents include lists or maps that will be helpful to you in answering this question.

Some communities also have Conservation Advisory Councils. These local environmental advisory groups, made up of volunteer members from the community, often have already completed local inventories of plant and animal species. They may be a helpful source of information and maps.

Once you have checked with DEC information sources and local information held at the municipality, you can answer the question.

Answering the Question

Answer no if your search finds that there are no threatened or endangered species, or their associated habitats occurring on, or close to, the project site. Again note that new site specific inventories of animals should not be necessary.

Answer yes if your search finds that threatened or endangered species or their associated habitats are known to occur on, or close to, the project site. Again, note that new site specific inventories of animals are not expected, but additional follow-up consultation with the DEC should be done.

Other Useful Links

For a list of animals listed by the State as endangered or threatened, go to the State Threatened and Endangered Species List page. You can also find a list of endangered and threatened fishes on DEC's website.

For other information on endangered species, go to the Endangered Species Unit page.

For information on the New York Natural Heritage Program and a list of plants listed by the State as endangered or threatened, go to the NY Natural Heritage page or the Biodiversity and Species Conservation Page.

Information on federal endangered species, go to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service page. You may also find additional information at the Region 5 Office of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

NYS's Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy (CWCS) Plan may also have information on threatened and endangered species.

Back to Part 1 Project Information ΙΙ Continue to Question 16 - (Part 1)


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