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Q. 10, Short EAF (Part 1) Water Supply

Short Environmental Assessment Form Workbook

Will the proposed action connect to an existing public/private water supply?
If No, describe method for providing potable water:
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________
__________________________________________________

Background Information

New York State's waters are an important natural resource used for industry, agriculture, power supply, mining, domestic consumption, recreation, and for fish and wildlife species. Managing the use of this resource is important for the State's economic growth, and the health of its citizens and the environment. Water is not an inexhaustible resource, and any proposed action that will impact a water supply needs to be evaluated.

All public water supplies (systems) in NYS are regulated through the NYS Department of Health Drinking Water Protection Program. The Department of Health defines a public water system as: "...any entity which provides water to the public for human consumption through pipes or other constructed conveyances. In New York, any system with at least five service connections or that regularly serves an average of at least 25 people daily for at least 60 days out of the year is considered a public water system." For the purposes of SEQR, a private water supply is defined as a water supply that falls outside of the Department of Health's definition of a public water system.

Some unlisted projects will not need a water supply. For those that do, you will need to know if you are going to connect to an existing public or private water supply, or develop a new supply. Private water supplies may come from a dug or drilled well, or a surface water body such as a lake.

If water is required for the project but there is no existing supply, you will generally describe the method to be used for supplying potable water. If you do not know if a public or private water supply exists in the area, contact the local municipality, the local building inspector or the Department of Health

Answering the Question

Part 1 (of this question):

Answer no if the proposed project will not connect to an existing public or private water supply.

Answer no if the proposed project will have no need to connect to any water supply.

Answer yes if the proposed project will connect to an existing public or private water supply.

Part 2 (of this question):

If your answer in part 1 of this question is no, but the proposed activity will require a water supply then describe the method proposed for supplying that water. If a new drilled well will be used to supply water, state that here.

If your answer in part 1 of this question is no, and the proposed activity will not require a water supply then simply state that the project does not require a water supply here.

Other Useful Links

Back to Part 1 Project Information || Continue to SEAF - Question 11 - (Part 1)


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