Department of Environmental Conservation

D E C banner

Be a Volunteer Reef Angler or Diver

Volunteer Reef Angler Program

angler holding a black sea bass
Angler holds his black sea bass catch,
a common fish found on New York's
artificial reefs.
~Photo courtesy of Capt. Neil Delanoy~

The DEC Reef Monitoring Program is looking for anglers to record their catch while fishing New York's artificial reefs. Reef angler surveys help DEC keep track of fish catches from year to year and monitor the effectiveness of the reefs.

By sharing a record of your catch, you can help DEC in many aspects, including monitoring fishing effort, discovering what fish are visiting the reef, and determining the benefit of these reefs to the New York fishery.

How To Participate

angler holding a tautog/blackfish
Angler holds his prized blackfish catch
from one of New York's reefs.
~Photo courtesy of Capt. Neil Delanoy~

Download a copy of the Artificial Reef Angler Log (PDF) (235 KB) to take with you on your next fishing adventure. Record your catch and submit the completed log to DEC's Artificial Reef Program by one of the following methods:

  • Mail: send to the address found in the right sidebar of this page (with Attn: Artificial Reef Program)
  • Fax: (631) 444-0449
  • E-mail

Volunteer Reef Diver Program

The DEC Marine Artificial Reef Monitoring Program can benefit from the observations made by divers to learn what is happening on the various artificial reefs sites. Divers can help DEC by recording specific details of each dive, such as environmental conditions and types and numbers of animals they see.

The recorded information can help monitor the benefit of these reefs to the recreational fishing and diving communities and can also document local abundance of fish, lobsters, and other marine animals. Furthermore, the personal dive observations you provide will help the DEC to develop a more effective artificial reef program that can enhance future diving and fishing opportunities in New York's marine waters.

How to Participate

Print or download a copy of the Artificial Reef Diver Log (PDF) (351 KB) to take with you on your next diving adventure. Record your observations and submit the completed log to DEC's Artificial Reef Program by one of the following methods:

  • Mail: send to the address found in the right sidebar of this page (with Attn: Artificial Reef Program)
  • Fax: (631) 444-0449
  • E-mail
An American Lobster protecting it's lair
An American lobster (Homarus americanus) protects its lair in one
of the many rock piles on the Atlantic Beach Reef. Lobster easily
blend in with the colonized reef rock which is home to bryozoans,
sponges and corals. Rock provides stable and durable reef building
habitat for both structure associated finfish and crustacean species.
Photo by Christopher LaPorta.
Mandy Ray vessel underwater
The wheelhouse of the sunken vessel Mandy Ray colonized by a
variety of organisms including anemones, bryozoans and sponges.

  • PDF Help
  • For help with PDFs on this page, please call 631-444-0438.
  • Contact for this Page
  • Division of Marine Resources
    205 North Belle Mead Road, Suite 1
    East Setauket, New York 11733
    631-444-0438
    Send us an email
  • This Page Covers
  • Page applies to NYS Marine Costal District