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Alder Bottom Wildlife Management Area

Alder Bottom Wildlife Management Area Map || Alder Bottom Wildlife Management Area Map (PDF, 592 KB) || Google Earth || State Lands Interactive Mapper

Size: 818 acres

Alder Bottom WMA is located approximately 15 miles west of the city of Jamestown in the towns of Clymer and Sherman in Chautauqua County. The area is primarily made up of wetland habitat.

Day Use Activities and Recreational Opportunities

Alder Bottom WMA in winter
Alder Bottom WMA in winter
  • Hiking
  • Hunting
  • Trapping
  • Wildlife Observation

A few activities are prohibited: off road vehicular travel (i.e. cars, trucks, snowmobiles, motorcycles and all terrain vehicles), swimming, boating with motors, and camping.

Watchable Wildlife

Watchable wildlife symbol

Users of the area are likely to encounter a variety of wildlife species. The more common species are beaver, muskrat, mink, raccoon, mallards, wood ducks, black ducks, Canada geese, deer, ruffed grouse, woodcock, herons and bitterns and a variety of song birds.

History

Alder Bottom WMA in spring
Alder Bottom WMA in spring

The area was purchased in 1991 by DEC with funds from the 1986 Environmental Quality Bond Act. The area consists of nearly 700 acres of shrub swamp, emergent marsh and wetland open water and approximately 100 acres of brush and grassland.

The area was acquired to ensure the permanent preservation of this diverse natural wetland.

Management

Current development and management objectives for the area are to provide habitat for a variety of resident and migratory species and to permit compatible wildlife related recreational use. A shallow water impoundment was created to attract waterfowl. An annual system of grassland mowing is done to keep open fields from reverting to brush and trees. These activities are carried out with monies derived mainly from hunting license fees and federal taxes on sporting arms and ammunition.

For more information, call or write to:

NYS DEC
Region 9 Wildlife Manager
182 East Union Street, Suite 3
Allegany, NY 14706
716-372-0645

Directions

From Interstate 86: Take Sherman Exit 6 to route 76 south approximately four miles.