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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has added a link to a translation service developed by Microsoft Inc., entitled Bing Translator, as a convenience to visitors to the DEC website who speak languages other than English.

Additional information can be found at DEC's Language Assistance Page.

Kissena Lake

Located just east of Flushing Meadows Corona Park, the 8.5-acre Kissena Lake offers tranquility within the borough of Queens. One of New York City's natural waterbodies, Kissena Lake has been through several man-made transformations, the latest of which was completed in 2003 to bring the lake back to a more "natural" condition. Almost three-quarters of the shoreline now consists of a soft-edge of terrestrial and wetland plant species whereas, at one time, this shoreline was composed entirely of concrete.

Physical Features

Area: 8.5 acres
Average depth: 4 - 5 feet

Access

Shoreline access is available at many areas surrounding the lake. Those anglers fishing with children may wish to take advantage of the areas of the lake with railings.

Fishing Information

Common carp from Kissena Lake

Kissena Lake offers several warmwater fishing opportunities. Bluegill sunfish compose the largest proportion of the fish community with the next largest proportion consisting of black crappie. A large number of young-of-the-year black crappie were found during an October, 2007, DEC fishery survey of Kissena Lake. Fish surviving from this year-class should now offer excellent black crappie fishing. While 15" largemouth bass are less prevalent than at Prospect Park Lake, fishing for the humongous carp of Kissena can be an excellent experience. For how to catch these fish, check out DEC website information on carp fishing. Generally, fishing the vegetated shoreline should yield the best results but take care not to damage shoreline plantings. You may wish to try lures over bait, not only for the excitement but because Kissena is home to a large turtle population, many of who will go for whatever bait is attached to your hook!

Species Present

For more information on these fish species, visit the page on Freshwater Fishes.

Largemouth bass
Bluegill
Pumpkinseed
Black crappie
Common carp
American eel
Yellow perch

Special Regulations

Special regulations apply.

New York City Department of Parks and Recreation rules require the use of non-lead weights and barbless hooks.

Fisheries Survey Summary

Data collected during DEC fishery surveys in 2005, 2007 and 2008 suggest both predator (bass) and prey (sunfish) species in the larger size ranges are low in number. The potential cause of this could be illegal take of fish. The table below compares the electrofishing largemouth bass catch per hour for six New York City waterbodies. Note that Kissena Lake catch per hour of 8" fish is comparable with other NYC waterbodies, but the catch rate drops for fish 12" and larger. If you observe anyone taking fish from Kissena or any other NYC lake or pond with catch-and-release regulations, contact our Environmental Conservation Officers or call 877-TIPP-DEC. It is also illegal to place fish, fish eggs or other wildlife (including turtles) into the waters of New York State. Following DEC regulations means healthier natural resources for all of us.

Largemouth Bass Catch/Hour for Eight New York City Waterbodies (table updated 2013)
Waterbody 8" and over 12" and over 15" and over
Baisley Pond 23 19 10
Central Park Lake 18 15 9
Harlem Meer 177 34 7
Indian Lake 20 20 1
Kissena Lake 23 12 4
Oakland Lake 87 21 11
Prospect Park Lake 81 31 14
Van Cortlandt Lake 109 19 6
Willowbrook Lake 110 57 3