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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has added a link to a translation service developed by Microsoft Inc., entitled Bing Translator, as a convenience to visitors to the DEC website who speak languages other than English.

Additional information can be found at DEC's Language Assistance Page.

West-Central New York

Public Fishing Rights Maps

Public Fishing Rights (PFR's) are permanent easements purchased by the NYSDEC from willing landowners, giving anglers the right to fish and walk along the bank (usually a 33' strip on one or both banks of the stream). For more information on PFR and legally permissible activities on those easements, please see our Public Fishing Rights page.

Most PFR easements are on trout streams. While keeping and eating the fish you catch is part of the fishing experience, many people choose to release their catch. If you release the fish you catch, please review our Catching and Releasing Trout page for tips on reducing the mortality of released trout. Want to know how much that fish you released weighed? Our Use a Ruler to Weigh Your Fish page will help you estimate the weight of your catch.

Below are links to pdf files of the generalized location maps that are intended to aid anglers in finding PFR segments and are not survey quality. Width of displayed PFR is displayed wider than reality to make it more visible on the maps. Please look for official PFR signs to ensure that you are in the right location and have legal access to the stream bank.

Prevent the Spread of didymo! - Didymo is an invasive algae that can negatively impact trout populations. It has been found in several of New York's trout streams and could spread to other waters without proper precautions. Wading anglers are a primary means of spreading didymo. For more information on didymo and how you can avoid spreading it, please see the "Didymo Alert" link to the right!

Felt Sole Considerations

DEC encourages anglers to consider alternatives to felt-soled waders such as rubber studded boots. Felt-soles, due to their ability to absorb didymo cells and to stay damp for prolonged periods of time, are a major vector in spreading didymo and require special treatment (prolonged soaking in disinfectant).

Chemung County

Public Fishing Rights in Chemung County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Catharine Creek (PDF)
(772 KB)
Rainbow trout Catharine Creek originates in northern Chemung County and flows in a northerly direction until it empties into Seneca Lake at Watkins Glen. Catharine Creek is best known for its annual migration of wild rainbow trout in the Spring. Thousands of anglers each year descend on Catharine Creek to try and catch beautiful lake run rainbow trout.
Cayuta Creek and McCorn Creek (PDF)
(1.05 MB)
Brown trout Cayuta Creek, also known locally as Shepherds Creek, originates at Cayuta Lake in Schuyler County, flows southeast through northeastern Chemung County and eventually joins the Susquehanna River near the Town of Waverly in Tioga County. Cayuta Creek contains primarily brown trout, both stocked and wild, and offers excellent trout fishing opportunities.

Genesee Counties

Public Fishing Rights in Genesee County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Oatka Creek and
Spring Creek (PDF)

(741 KB)
Brown trout Oatka Creek is a freestone stream located in Monroe and Genesee Counties. The 1.7 mile section of stream running through Oatka Creek County Park, located in the Town of Wheatland, is prized for it's wild brown trout fishery. The Oatka is inhabited primarily by brown trout, but don't be surprised if you catch a warm water game fish such as black bass or northern pike.

Livingston County

Public Fishing Rights in Livingston County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Cohocton River (PDF)
(1.35 MB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Cohocton River originates in southern Livingston County and flows southeasterly through Steuben County until it enters the Chemung River. The Cohocton River provides a unique year round trout fishery. The upper section of the Cohocton River contains wild brook trout as well as both wild and stocked brown trout. Brook trout are found primarily in the colder headwaters. The lower portions of the Cohocton River contain stocked brown trout and an occasional wild brown trout or brook trout. Some large trout (over 20 inches) can be found in this portion of the river.
Springwater Creek and Limekiln Creek (PDF)
(503 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Springwater Creek originates in northern Steuben County and flows in a northerly direction until it empties into Hemlock Lake, near Springwater, in Livingston County. Springwater Creek is popular among anglers during the spring migration of rainbow trout. Brown trout will occasionally enter the stream in the Fall and provide additional angling.

Monroe County

Public Fishing Rights in Monroe County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Irondequoit Creek (PDF)
(1.17 MB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Irondequoit Creek flows through Ontario and Monroe counties emptying into Irondequoit Bay on Lake Ontario. Irondequoit Creek is one of the best rainbow trout (steelhead) streams in New York State. Although it has only a small amount of Public Fishing Rights Areas purchased by the NYSDEC, numerous city, town and county parks offer additional access sites on Irondequoit Creek. Each year the Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) stocks 27,500 rainbow trout (steelhead) and 7,600 brown trout including over 1,500 two year old fish. Monroe County also stocks brown trout into the portion of Irondequoit Creek within Powder Mill Park. Wild brown trout are found upstream of Powder Mill Park.
Lower Genessee River (PDF)
(601 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Chinook salmon
Coho salmon
The lower portion of the Genesee River offers some of the most exciting fishing in New York State. Downstream of the lower falls near the Driving Park Avenue bridge, the fish population changes seasonally to reflect that of Lake Ontario, including species such as brown trout, rainbow trout (steelhead), coho salmon and chinook salmon.
Oatka Creek and
Spring Creek (PDF)

(741 KB)
Brown trout Oatka Creek is a freestone stream located in Monroe and Genesee Counties. The 1.7 mile section of stream running through Oatka Creek County Park, located in the Town of Wheatland, is prized for it's wild brown trout fishery. The Oatka is inhabited primarily by brown trout, but don't be surprised if you catch a warm water game fish such as black bass or northern pike. Each year the Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) stocks 11,200 brown trout, primarily along Oatka Trail Road in Genesee County and the Scottsville Village Park in Monroe County.
Sandy Creek (PDF)
(661 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Chinook salmon
Coho salmon
Sandy Creek flows through Orleans and Monroe Counties, emptying into Lake Ontario west of Rochester. Fall runs of coho salmon, brown trout and chinook salmon offer good opportunities for anglers. Runs of rainbow trout (steelhead) occur in late fall and early spring, offering additional angler enjoyment.
Slater Creek (PDF)
(601 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Chinook salmon
Coho salmon
Slater Creek is a small tributary of Lake Ontario, 1.3 miles west of the Genesee River. Rochester Gas and Electric's Russell station used to discharge warm cooling system water into the lower portion of Slater Creek, providing a unique winter fishery in the creek and the waters of Lake Ontario in the plume of this warm water. This discharge also provided additional flow to the lower creek that drew large numbers of migrating trout and salmon into the creek. At the present time, Russell station is not producing electricity and therefore is not discharging additional warm flows into Slater Creek. Migratory Chinook and coho salmon, rainbow and brown trout still run up Slater Creek, but in fewer numbers than in the past. Warm water sport and panfish such as smallmouth bass, freshwater drum, rock bass, sunfish, bullhead, channel catfish, yellow perch, carp, and suckers are also caught in the creek and lake. This recently re-paved access site is popular for urban anglers, since it is close to the City of Rochester.

Ontario County

Public Fishing Rights in Ontario County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Irondequoit Creek (PDF)
(1.17 MB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Irondequoit Creek flows through Ontario and Monroe counties emptying into Irondequoit Bay on Lake Ontario. Irondequoit Creek is one of the best rainbow trout (steelhead) streams in New York State. Although it has only a small amount of Public Fishing Rights Areas purchased by the NYSDEC, numerous city, town and county parks offer additional access sites on Irondequoit Creek. Each year the Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) stocks 27,500 rainbow trout (steelhead) and 7,600 brown trout including over 1,500 two year old fish. Monroe County also stocks brown trout into the portion of Irondequoit Creek within Powder Mill Park. Wild brown trout are found upstream of Powder Mill Park.
Naples Creek (PDF)
(756 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
Naples Creek flows through southern Ontario County and empties into Canandaigua Lake in Yates County. Naples Creek and its tributaries are well known for their spring runs of wild rainbow trout. Many anglers come to Naples Creek each year in search of trophy rainbow trout. Grimes Creek, a tributary of Naples Creek, also supports wild brown and brook trout in its upper reaches.

Orleans County

Public Fishing Rights in Orleans County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Johnson Creek (PDF)
(587 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Chinook salmon
Coho salmon
Johnson Creek flows though Niagara and Orleans Counties, emptying into Lake Ontario. This stream offers better than average cold water fishing with opportunities to catch brown trout, rainbow trout (steelhead) and Chinook and Coho salmon. Fish can run as far upstream as the dam in Lyndonville.
Oak Orchard River and Marsh Creek (PDF)
(485 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Chinook salmon
Coho salmon
The Oak Orchard River begins at the Oak Orchard swamps in Genesee County and flows through Orleans County, emptying into Lake Ontario at Point Breeze. Marsh Creek, a prominent tributary of the Oak Orchard River, meets up with the river at an area known as "The Bridges." Oak Orchard River and Marsh Creek offer excellent cold water fishing with opportunities to catch brown trout, rainbow trout (steelhead), chinook and coho salmon. Runs of these fish offer some of the most exciting cold water fishing in New York State.
Sandy Creek (PDF)
(661 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Chinook salmon
Coho salmon
Sandy Creek flows through Orleans and Monroe Counties, emptying into Lake Ontario west of Rochester. Fall runs of coho salmon, brown trout and chinook salmon offer good opportunities for anglers. Runs of rainbow trout (steelhead) occur in late fall and early spring, offering additional angler enjoyment.

Schuyler County

Public Fishing Rights in Schuyler County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Catharine Creek (PDF)
(772 KB)
Rainbow trout Catharine Creek originates in northern Chemung County and flows in a northerly direction until it empties into Seneca Lake at Watkins Glen. Catharine Creek is best known for its annual migration of wild rainbow trout in the Spring. Thousands of anglers each year descend on Catharine Creek to try and catch beautiful lake run rainbow trout.
Cayuta Creek (PDF)
(1.05 MB)
Brown trout Cayuta Creek, also known locally as Shepherds Creek, originates at Cayuta Lake in Schuyler County, flows southeast through northeastern Chemung County and eventually joins the Susquehanna River near the Town of Waverly in Tioga County. Cayuta Creek contains primarily brown trout, both stocked and wild, and offers excellent trout fishing opportunities.

Steuben County

Public Fishing Rights in Steuben County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Cryder Creek (PDF)
(423 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Cryder Creek begins in Steuben County and flows through the Village of Whitesville in southeastern Allegany County and eventually joins the Genesee River, just over the Pennsylvania border. There are 5.8 miles of public fishing rights easements on this stream.The upper reaches of Cryder Creek, especially the portion in Steuben County, are supported entirely by wild brown trout and brook trout. The upper section in Steuben County is also known as Marsh Creek.
Keuka Lake Inlet
(Cold Brook)(PDF)

(523 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Keuka Lake Inlet is located in Steuben County between the Towns of Bath and Hammondsport. The majority of the stream is accessible through public easements. The spring runs of wild rainbow trout and fall runs of brown trout offer some of the best seasonal trout fishing in New York State.
Cohocton River (PDF)
(1.35 MB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Cohocton River originates in southern Livingston County and flows southeasterly through Steuben County until it enters the Chemung River. The Cohocton River provides a unique year round trout fishery. The upper section of the Cohocton River contains wild brook trout as well as both wild and stocked brown trout. Brook trout are found primarily in the colder headwaters. The lower portions of the Cohocton River contain stocked brown trout and an occasional wild brown trout or brook trout. Some large trout (over 20 inches) can be found in this portion of the river.
Mill Creek (PDF)
(494 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Mill Creek is located in the northwest corner of Steuben County. This stream is supported entirely by naturally reproducing wild populations of both brook trout and brown trout and provides year round opportunities for anglers seeking wild trout. Brook trout are found mostly upstream of Patchinville while brown trout become dominant further downstream. This stream is one of the most productive wild trout streams in DEC Region 8.
Neil Creek (PDF)
(681 KB)
Brown trout Neil Creek flows in an easterly direction and enters the Cohocton River near Avoca. There is a healthy population of wild brown trout in this stream that offers excellent fishing opportunities.

Yates County

Public Fishing Rights in Yates County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Guyanoga Creek (PDF)
(532 KB)
Rainbow trout Guyanoga Creek, which flows into the western branch of Keuka Lake near Branchport, supports a small annual migration of wild rainbow trout.