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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has added a link to a translation service developed by Microsoft Inc., entitled Bing Translator, as a convenience to visitors to the DEC website who speak languages other than English.

Additional information can be found at DEC's Language Assistance Page.

East-Central New York

Public Fishing Rights Maps

Public Fishing Rights (PFR's) are permanent easements purchased by the NYSDEC from willing landowners, giving anglers the right to fish and walk along the bank (usually a 33' strip on one or both banks of the stream). For more information on PFR and legally permissible activities on those easements, please see our Public Fishing Rights page.

Most PFR easements are on trout streams. While keeping and eating the fish you catch is part of the fishing experience, many people choose to release their catch. If you release the fish you catch, please review our Catching and Releasing Trout page for tips on reducing the mortality of released trout. Want to know how much that fish you released weighed? Our Use a Ruler to Weigh Your Fish page will help you estimate the weight of your catch.

Below are links to pdf files of the generalized location maps that are intended to aid anglers in finding PFR segments and are not survey quality. Width of displayed PFR is displayed wider than reality to make it more visible on the maps. Please look for official PFR signs to ensure that you are in the right location and have legal access to the stream bank.

Prevent the Spread of didymo! - Didymo is an invasive algae that can negatively impact trout populations. It has been found in several of New York's trout streams and could spread to other waters without proper precautions. Wading anglers are a primary means of spreading didymo. For more information on didymo and how you can avoid spreading it, please see the "Didymo Alert" link to the right!

Known Regional Didymo Streams

Didymo has been confirmed in the West and East Branches of the Delaware River and in the mainstem of the Delaware River.

Other waters might be infected. Always clean and disinfect your gear prior to fishing and after you leave a fishing spot to prevent the spread of invasive species.

Felt Sole Considerations

DEC encourages anglers to consider alternatives to felt-soled waders such as rubber studded boots. Felt-soles, due to their ability to absorb didymo cells and to stay damp for prolonged periods of time, are a major vector in spreading didymo and require special treatment (prolonged soaking in disinfectant).

Albany County

Public Fishing Rights in Albany County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Catskill Creek (PDF)
(783 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Catskill Creek flows for 37 miles through three counties before entering the Hudson River at the village of Catskill. The source is a shallow water body, Franklinton Vlaie in Schoharie County, which heats up in the summer. The upper 2 miles is considered warm water and unsuitable for trout. The next section is 5 miles long and ends about 0.5 miles upstream of the village of Preston Hollow in Albany County. This section has abundant wild trout, both brown and rainbows. From Preston Hollow downstream 13 miles to the Freehold airport in Greene County, the stream is stocked with 6,500 yearling and 400 two year old brown trout. There are some wild brown and rainbow trout in this section with the best numbers in the Preston Hollow portion. From Freehold to the mouth, 16 miles, the stream is considered warm water with some bass and a good walleye fishery at the mouth in the village of Catskill.
Ten Mile Creek (PDF)
(552 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Ten Mile Creek flows for 10 miles before entering Catskill Creek about one mile east of the village of Oak Hill in Greene County. The lower 2 miles of the stream are in Greene County. Wild trout exist throughout the stream system, and it is not stocked. Brown and rainbow trout are both found in the lower 5 miles, but brown trout predominate in the upper 5 miles. Trout are more abundant as one heads upstream. Floods in 1996 and 1999 produced significant damage to the banks and habitat, particularly in the Greene County section of the stream. Habitat restoration work is proceeding in the lower stream sections, and trout populations should show improvement as a result.

Columbia County

Public Fishing Rights in Columbia County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Kinderhook Creek (PDF)
(691 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Kinderhook Creek is stocked annually with over 10,000 brown trout. Some wild brown trout reproduction exists, especially in the upstream areas, but is not a major contributor to the fishery. A few wild brook trout might be available in the upper sections of the creek that have dropped out of the colder tributary streams.
Roeliff Jansen Kill (PDF)
(558 KB)
Brown trout The Roeliff Jansen Kill flows for 54 miles before entering the Hudson River about 5 miles south of the City of Hudson. The stream above Bingham Mills contains some wild trout, but abundant populations are found mainly in the 13 mile section above Robinson Pond (near the village of Copake). This wild trout section runs through the village of Hillsdale. From Robinson Pond downstream to the village of Ancram, the 10 mile section is stocked with 3,800 yearling and 350 two year old brown trout. The next 6 mile section between Ancram and the Dutchess County border is heavily posted and not stocked. The Dutchess County portion runs 3 miles and is stocked with 2,200 yearling and 400 two year old brown trout. The next section of the stream, from Dutchess County to Bingham Mills runs 11 miles and is stocked with 9,900 yearling and 700 two year old brown trout.
Taghkanic Creek (PDF)
(421 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Taghkanic Creek flows for 29 miles before entering Claverack Creek about 1 mile west of the village of Claverack and 2 miles southeast of the city of Hudson. Wild trout exist throughout the system, but are abundant mainly in the headwaters. Both brook and brown trout in good numbers are found in the 6 mile stream section north of State Route 23 near the village of Craryville. The 10 mile section starting in Craryville and heading downstream to New Forge Road in the town of Taghkanic is heavily posted. The 13 mile section from New Forge Rd to the mouth is stocked with 2,750 yearling and 200 two year old brown trout. Stream flows in this lower stocked section are particularly affected by drought conditions as the city of Hudson diverts water from the stream for its use at a collection site on New Forge Rd.

Delaware County

Public Fishing Rights in Delaware County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Beaver Kill (PDF)
(851 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
The Beaver Kill is divided into the upper and lower sections at the confluence with the Willowemoc Creek in Roscoe, NY. Both sections support wild brown trout. The upper section of the river supports a wild brook trout population that increases as you move upstream towards the headwaters. Rainbow trout are also scattered throughout the watershed as a result of both natural reproduction and non-DEC stockings in private sections of the river. The DEC annually stocks over 18,000 brown trout in the Beaver Kill and seasonal anadromous runs of American shad are reported in some years from the lower section.
Bush Kill (PDF)
(310 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Bush Kill is a five mile long wild brown trout stream that flows into the East Branch of the Delaware River near the village of Margaretville. Brown trout from Pepacton Reservoir use this stream for spawning, and some of these large (20 inches or larger) trout stay in the stream instead of returning to the reservoir. Brook trout are present in low numbers in the upper reaches.
Charlotte Creek (PDF)
(516 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Charlotte Creek flows for 28.8 miles before entering the Susquehanna River near Oneonta. The stream supports wild brown and brook trout throughout its length. Beaver dams are common in the upper reaches. The wild trout population is supplemented with the stocking of approximately 4,900 yearling and 300 two year old brown trout in the 10.7 mile reach between the hamlets of Davenport Center and Fergusonville annually.
East Branch Delaware River (PDF)
(992 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
The East Branch of the Delaware River is divided into two sections by the Pepacton Reservoir. Below the Pepacton Reservoir, the East Branch is a tailwater fishery that supports wild populations of brown, rainbow, and occasional brook trout; plus seasonal anadromous runs of American shad with reports of occasional striped bass. The DEC stocks close to 3,000 brown trout annually in this stretch of river. Above the Pepecaton Reservoir, the DEC stocks a little over 5,000 brown trout annually in this section. Wild brown trout production exists. Public Fishing Access is granted by NYC via a DEP permit immediately upstream of the Pepacton Reservoir to the village of Margaretville ,but no Public Fishing Rights are available upstream of there except in one tributary stream, the Bush Kill.
East Brook (PDF)
(688 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The East Brook is a wild trout stream that flows into the West Branch of the Delaware River in the village of Walton. Brown and brook trout are both abundant throughout this 11 mile stream. The stream is lightly fished.
Little Delaware River (PDF)
(470 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Little Delaware River flows for 16 miles before entering the West Branch of the Delaware River just west of the village of Delhi. The wild brown and brook trout populations are supplemented with the stocking of about 700 brown trout yearlings annually. These hatchery fish are stocked in a 0.8 mile reach at the mouth and a 1.2 mile reach downstream of the hamlet of Bovina Center. Brown trout are the dominant wild trout in the stream, but brook trout abundances increase upstream of Bovina Center.
West Branch Delaware River (PDF)
( 2.5 MB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
The West Branch of the Delaware River is divided into two sections by the Cannonsville Reservoir. Downstream of the Cannonsville Reservoir, the West Branch is a tailwater fishery that supports excellent wild populations of brown, rainbow, and occasional brook trout (none are stocked); plus seasonal anadromous runs of American shad with reports of occasional striped bass. Upstream of the Cannonsville Reservoir, the river is stocked with over 14,000 brown trout by the DEC. In addition to the stocked fish, a wild brown trout population flourishes.

Greene County

Public Fishing Rights in Greene County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Batavia Kill (PDF)
(386 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
The Batavia Kill flows for 22 miles before entering Schoharie Creek just upstream of the village of Prattsville. Wild trout exist throughout the stream, but they are abundant only in the upper reaches above Batavia Pond (an in-stream impoundment) located in C.D. Lane Park. Brown and brook trout can be found above Batavia Pond, while brown trout predominate below the pond. In addition, approximately 5,800 yearling and 350 two year old brown trout are stocked in the lower 19 miles of stream. Batavia Pond is also stocked with rainbow trout, and some of those fish leave the reservoir and enter the stream.
Catskill Creek (PDF)
(783 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Catskill Creek flows for 37 miles through three counties before entering the Hudson River at the village of Catskill. The source is a shallow water body, Franklinton Vlaie in Schoharie County, which heats up in the summer. The upper 2 miles is considered warm water and unsuitable for trout. The next section is 5 miles long and ends about 0.5 miles upstream of the village of Preston Hollow in Albany County. This section has abundant wild trout, both brown and rainbows. From Preston Hollow downstream 13 miles to the Freehold airport in Greene County, the stream is stocked with 6,500 yearling and 400 two year old brown trout. There are some wild brown and rainbow trout in this section with the best numbers in the Preston Hollow portion. From Freehold to the mouth, 16 miles, the stream is considered warm water with some bass and a good walleye fishery at the mouth in the village of Catskill.
East Kill (PDF)
(813 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Schoharie Creek flows for 86 miles through three counties before entering the Mohawk River at the village of Fort Hunter. The upper 27 miles above Schoharie Reservoir, all in Greene County, are considered trout water, with a fish barrier dam at mile 60. Below the reservoir, Schoharie Creek is considered warm water with bass and walleye. Wild trout exist throughout the Greene County portion of Schoharie Creek, but are not abundant except for the headwaters: the upper 4 miles of the stream. Many of the small tributaries contain brook trout. From the barrier dam at Prattsville upstream to the village of Elka Park, 22 miles, the stream is stocked with 16,300 yearling and 1,600 two year old brown trout.
Schoharie Creek (PDF)
(813 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Schoharie Creek flows for 86 miles through three counties before entering the Mohawk River at the village of Fort Hunter. The upper 27 miles above Schoharie Reservoir, all in Greene County, are considered trout water, with a fish barrier dam at mile 60. Below the reservoir, Schoharie Creek is considered warm water with bass and walleye. Wild trout exist throughout the Greene County portion of Schoharie Creek, but are not abundant except for the headwaters: the upper 4 miles of the stream. Many of the small tributaries contain brook trout. From the barrier dam at Prattsville upstream to the village of Elka Park, 22 miles, the stream is stocked with 16,300 yearling and 1,600 two year old brown trout.
Ten Mile Creek (PDF)
(552 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Ten Mile Creek flows for 10 miles before entering Catskill Creek about one mile east of the village of Oak Hill in Greene County. The lower 2 miles of the stream are in Greene County. Wild trout exist throughout the stream system, and it is not stocked. Brown and rainbow trout are both found in the lower 5 miles, but brown trout predominate in the upper 5 miles. Trout are more abundant as one heads upstream. Floods in 1996 and 1999 produced significant damage to the banks and habitat, particularly in the Greene County section of the stream. Habitat restoration work is proceeding in the lower stream sections, and trout populations should show improvement as a result.
West Kill (PDF)
(512 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
The West Kill flows for 11 miles before entering Schoharie Creek just below the village of Lexington. Wild trout are found throughout the stream, but they are most abundant in the upper 8 miles. Wild brown trout can be found in all sections of the stream, but rainbow trout are found mostly in the lower reaches, and brook trout numbers increase as one heads upstream. In addition, approximately 700 yearling brown trout are stocked in the lower 3 miles of stream.

Otsego County

Public Fishing Rights in Otsego County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Butternut Creek (PDF)
(694 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Butternut Creek flows for 37 miles before entering the Unadilla River downstream of Mt. Upton. The lower 15 miles supports a warmwater fishery dominated by largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, walleye, chain pickerel, rock bass, and yellow perch. The trout population in the 16 mile reach upstream of Morris is supplemented with the stocking of approximately 3,400 yearling and 225 two year old brown trout. The wild brown and brook trout populations are adversely impacted by the many beaver dams on this low gradient stream. Brook trout are abundant in the upper reaches of Butternut Creek and in many of its tributaries.
Charlotte Creek (PDF)
(516 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Charlotte Creek flows for 28.8 miles before entering the Susquehanna River near Oneonta. The stream supports wild brown and brook trout throughout its length. Beaver dams are common in the upper reaches. The wild trout population is supplemented with the stocking of approximately 4,900 yearling and 300 two year old brown trout in the 10.7 mile reach between the hamlets of Davenport Center and Fergusonville annually.
Otego Creek (PDF)
(6561 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Otego Creek flows for 29 miles before entering the Susquehanna River west of Oneonta. The lower 10 miles supports a low quality warmwater fishery for walleye, smallmouth bass, and rock bass. From Laurens upstream to Hartwick, the wild trout population in this 14.6 mile reach is supplemented with the stocking of approximately 2,900 yearling and 125 two year old brown trout annually. Brown trout abundance is higher in the lower reach and brook trout in the upper reach. Many of the tributaries to Otego Creek are dominated by wild brook trout.
Schenevus Creek (PDF)
(716 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Schenevus Creek flows through 28 miles of agricultural lands before entering the Susquehanna River. The lower six miles supports a marginal warmwater fishery for smallmouth bass and rock bass. The next nine miles through the village of Schenevus is stocked with approximately 4,000 yearling and 500 two year old brown trout annually to supplement the sparse wild brown trout population. The four mile reach above Schenevus is inaccessible to wading anglers. Brook trout are abundant throughout the remainder of the stream upstream of Worcester and in its many tributaries.
Wharton Creek (PDF)
(780 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Wharton Creek flows for 31 miles before entering the Unadilla River at the village of New Berlin. Wild brown and brook trout are sparse throughout the river but are locally abundant in some areas. Approximately 3,700 yearling and 250 two year old brown trout are stocked in the 20 mile reach between the mouth and Burlington Flats. This low gradient stream flows through a broad agricultural valley that is often 100-500 yards from the road. Pools tend to be large and deep. Small brook trout are common in many of the Wharton Creek tributaries.

Schoharie County

Public Fishing Rights in Schoharie County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Catskill Creek (PDF)
(783 KB)
Brown trout
Rainbow trout
Catskill Creek flows for 37 miles through three counties before entering the Hudson River at the village of Catskill. The source is a shallow water body, Franklinton Vlaie in Schoharie County, which heats up in the summer. The upper 2 miles is considered warm water and unsuitable for trout. The next section is 5 miles long and ends about 0.5 miles upstream of the village of Preston Hollow in Albany County. This section has abundant wild trout, both brown and rainbows. From Preston Hollow downstream 13 miles to the Freehold airport in Greene County, the stream is stocked with 6,500 yearling and 400 two year old brown trout. There are some wild brown and rainbow trout in this section with the best numbers in the Preston Hollow portion. From Freehold to the mouth, 16 miles, the stream is considered warm water with some bass and a good walleye fishery at the mouth in the village of Catskill.
Panther Creek (PDF)
(300 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
Panther Creek flows for 9 miles before entering Schoharie Creek just upstream of Max Shaul State Park near the hamlet of Breakabeen. The stream supports an abundant population of wild brook trout throughout much of the stream. Brown and rainbow trout are present in the downstream reaches.

Rensselaer County

Public Fishing Rights in Rensselaer County
Location
(Link to PFR Map)
Species Description
Hoosic River and
Little Hoosic River (PDF)

(651 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
Rainbow trout
The Hoosic and Little Hoosic Rivers are wild brown and rainbow trout streams that are not stocked by the DEC. The Little Hoosic River has wild brook trout in the headwaters area of the river. Large brown trout can be caught in either river with 20+ inch fish not unheard of.
Kinderhook Creek (PDF)
(691 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Kinderhook Creek is stocked annually with over 10,000 brown trout. Some wild brown trout reproduction exists, especially in the upstream areas, but is not a major contributor to the fishery. A few wild brook trout might be available in the upper sections of the creek that have dropped out of the colder tributary streams.
Poesten Kill and
Quaken Kill (PDF)

(454 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Poesten Kill is stocked annually with over 6,000 brown trout by the DEC with some contribution to the fishery by a wild brown trout population. There is a small wild brook trout population in the headwaters area of the Poesten Kill. The Quaken Kill is not stocked; however, it does have a wild brown trout population to provide a challenge to anglers.
Wynants Kill (PDF)
(345 KB)
Brown trout
Brook trout
The Wynants Kill flows for 11 miles before entering the Hudson River in the city of Troy. Wild trout are found throughout the 10 mile section above Burden Pond (located within the Troy city limits). Brook trout are seen in the headwaters, but may be migrants from nearby tributaries. Brown trout redominate in most of the stream. The headwaters are warmed in the summer by water flows from Burden Lake. As a result, the best wild trout populations occur between the villages of West Sand Lake and Wynantskill. The section from mile 8 to 10, from a mile upstream to just downstream of West Sand Lake, is stocked with 700 brown trout yearlings.