NY.gov Portal State Agency Listing Search all of NY.gov
D E C banner
D E C banner

Disclaimer

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has added a link to a translation service developed by Microsoft Inc., entitled Bing Translator, as a convenience to visitors to the DEC website who speak languages other than English.

Additional information can be found at DEC's Language Assistance Page.

Cherry Creek (2007)

Fisheries Survey Summary

Cherry Creek, located in eastern Chautauqua County was surveyed on June 14, 2007 to check on the condition of the wild brown trout population in this stream. Cherry Creek has not been stocked with hatchery trout since the early 1980's and was last surveyed by DEC in 1985 for the purposes of water class upgrading. In the 1985 survey it was reported as an "excellent trout stream". Additionally, New York State Museum staff surveyed the stream at one site in 2005 and found a very good number of wild brown trout.

Cherry Creek Wild Brown TroutIn 2007, the stream at the two survey sites located in the Village of Cherry Creek had an average width of 17 feet. Site #1, located just upstream of Rt. 83 had good trout habitat consisting of overhanging brush, undercut banks and one deep scour hole. The bottom was relatively silt free with a mainly gravel substrate. At site #1 we captured 57 yearling and older wild brown trout and 55 young of year brown trout in 585 feet of stream. The estimated number of yearling and older brown trout at site #1 was 568 fish/mile. Site #2, located above the Cherry Creek-Leon Road had relatively poor habitat consisting of shallow runs with some overhanging vegetation. This section of stream has been heavily channelized in the past and was somewhat turbid at the time of sampling due to bridge reconstruction work occurring upstream. At site #2 we captured 18 yearling and older wild brown trout and 5 young of year brown trout in 192 feet of stream. The estimated number of yearling and older brown trout at site #2 was 527 fish/mile. Other fish species captured at the two sites included blacknose dace, mottled sculpin, white sucker, northern hogsucker, creek chub and unidentified lamprey larvae.

This stream appears to benefit from cold water due to both deep glacial gravel deposits and sections of tributaries where flow goes underground before emerging in the main stream at ground water temperatures, thus keeping most of the lower section of the stream at temperatures good for trout growth and survival. In the early afternoon, with a bright sun and an air temperature at 78 degrees, the water temperature at site #1 was 60 degrees. The upper section of the stream was not sampled at this time due to posting and time constraints.


  • Important Links
  • PDF Help
  • For help with PDFs on this page, please call 518-402-8924.
  • Contact for this Page
  • DEC Region 9
    Bureau of Fisheries
    182 East Union Street
    Allegany, NY 14706
    716-372-0645
    Send us an email
  • This Page Covers
  • Page applies to Region 9