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Cranberry Lake Campground

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  • Dates of Operation: See campground schedule Cranberry Lake map and location in the Adirondacks
  • Camping Fee: $20 per night (out of state residents surcharge additional $5 per night)
  • Address: 243 Lone Pine Road, Cranberry Lake, NY 12927 (directions below)
  • GPS Info. (Latitude, Longitude): 44d11'44.90"N, 74d49'35.37"W
  • Campground Phone: (315) 848-2315
  • Regional Office Phone: (315) 265-3090
  • Make Your Camping Reservation: ReserveAmerica

Logo for Virtual Tour

Check out the virtual tour for this facility!

Campground Map PDF File (780 KB)

Firewood Restriction Map || (PDF file, 1 MB) View map showing 50-mile radius from which untreated firewood may be moved to this campground. For more information see firewood restrictions.

sunset behind a kayaker

One of the largest remote lakes in the Adirondacks and it's proximity to 50,000 acres of wilderness, intermingled with 50 miles of well developed trails makes Cranberry Lake the outdoor enthusiasts perfect vacation spot. Whether it's fishing, boating or just laying back and enjoying your well deserved vacation, Cranberry Lake is the spot for you. The lake has been stocked with trout in the past and many of the ponds, streams and rivers support excellent trout fishing. The perfectly formed forest canopy in the campground provides excellent shade on hot summer days while the undergrowth provides excellent privacy for campers. From Cranberry Lake to other Adirondack Campgrounds requires only a short trip on a major highway.

Amenities

Amenities 173 campsites; hot showers; flush toilets; trailer dump station; recycling center; boat launch near Cranberry Lake hamlet; pay telephone; sand beach with bathhouse; Picnic area with tables, fireplaces, and grills; Firewood Sales; Amphitheater; fishing pier; pavilion rental.

logo for accessible siteAccessible Features

Cranberry Lake Campground features an accessible picnic area, rest rooms, shower house, accessible tent and RV campsites and an accessible fishing pier. It is located in a picturesque wooded setting alongside Cranberry Lake. Full listing of DECs Accessible Recreation Destinations.

girl blowing bubbles

Featured Activities

logo for row boatlogo for power boatBoating

Power boats, rowboats, kayaks and canoes allowed. Rowboat and canoe rental available. The Oswegatchie River provides a canoe trip of approximately 16 miles starting at Inlet. For the more adventurous, a canoe carry of 3.5 miles offers the canoeist an additional unique opportunity to enjoy over 14.5 miles of unencumbered scenic waters on the Bog River Flow.

logo for fishingFishing

Bass, trout, and pan fish.

logo for hikingHiking

Cranberry Lake Campground offers a great base for hiking the numerous trails in the area. Two foot trails leave the campground. The 2.4 mile Bear Mountain Trail is a loop trail which offers a challenging climb and scenic vistas to the novice hiker. The campground trail provides access to a 17.4 mile loop trail system which is well maintained for casual hiking. The Cranberry Lake Wild Forest, the northern gateway to the Five Ponds Wilderness Area, covers 11 square miles.

Approximately 2 miles west of the hamlet is the Peavine Swamp Ski Trail System which is used by hikers to view a relatively untouched forest. The Five Ponds Wilderness Area has over 50 miles of foot trails which are generally more challenging.

logo for swimmingSwimming

A swimming beach available. * Please take note the swimming facilities at this location are not supervised by a lifeguard or other responsible person. In place of on-site supervision, this facility has established a series of safeguards to be followed by all guests, the details of which are outlined in a brochure presented to customers upon arrival at the facility.

sunset over the lake

Directions

From the West: I-81 take Exit 45 (Route 3) at Watertown. Take Route 3 to Cranberry Lake Village. Turn right on Lone Pine Road, campground is 1 mile south.

From the North: Take Route 56 south from Potsdam. At intersection with Route 3 turn right (west) and follow Route 3 to Cranberry Lake Village. Turn left onto Lone Pine Road, campground is 1 mile south.

From the South: From I-90 (NYS Thruway) west take Exit 27 at Amsterdam to Route 30 north. Take Route 30 north to Tupper Lake Village, turn left onto Route 3 west. Take Route 3 to Cranberry Lake Village, turn left on Lone Pine Road, campground is 1 mile south.

Get driving directions from Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Rules, Regulations and Outdoor Safety

DEC campground rules and regulations

Campground frequently asked questions

Clean your boat and equipment - help prevent the spread of aquatic invasives

Don't move firewood - help prevent of spread of invasive insects

Hiking safety tips

Additional Information

Historic Interest

nose of a kayak facing the water

The Cranberry Lake area is one of the largest remote areas remaining in the state. There has been only a minimum of civilized encroachment on the lake itself and just to the south lie thousands of acres of unbroken forest lands.

Originally, the lake was about half its present size, but in 1867 a log crib dam was completed at Cranberry Lake Village to control the flow of the river and improve navigation. The present concrete dam was built in 1916.

Cranberry Lake Campground has developed through several phases of construction. The original 15 sites were built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935. The supervisors cabin, bathhouse, and vault latrines were added in 1937. The next expansion was the peninsula loop in the early 1960's. Loops one through five were completed in the late 1960's, more than tripling the capacity of the campground. The latest major building to be built was the shower house in 1979.

Junior Naturalist Program

Our campgrounds become an outdoor classroom for young children (5-13) and their families. Enjoy games and activities to earn a beautiful embroidered patch.