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Lewis Preserve Wildlife Management Area

Lewis Preserve Wildlife Management Area Map || Lewis Preserve Wildlife Management Area Map (PDF) (642 KB) || Google Earth || State Lands Interactive Mapper

Hunter with bird dogs

In 1987, with great generosity and foresight, Dr. and Mrs. Revis Lewis made a gift of land to the Adirondack Nature Conservancy. Following an intensive ecological evaluation and with the approval of Dr. Lewis, the Adirondack Nature Conservancy donated the property to New York State as a Wildlife Management Area.

The 1,356 acre Lewis Preserve Wildlife Management Area in the town of Altona, Clinton County, offers a unique mix of abandoned farm fields and second growth forest. The area is located east of the Alder Bend Road between the Terrien Road on the north and the Jerusalem Road on the south. A 2.8 mile hiking trail traverses the entire length of the area , joining parking lots on the Terrien and Jerusalem Roads. A short side trail has been developed that meanders through primitive charcoal kilns on its way to the outlet of King Brook.

Recreational Opportunities

Hunting, fishing and trapping are integral parts of the conservation and management of New York's natural resources and the various Wildlife Management Areas across the state are no exception.

Grouse, whitetail deer, and black bear entice hunters to Lewis Preserve while beaver, mink and fisher attract the interest of trappers. Birdwatching and other wildlife viewing opportunities are also available.

Three major streams flow through the area, providing 2.5 miles of top quality fishing. The Great Chazy River forms much of the western boundary, with King Brook and Brandy Brook flowing into the river from the south. All three streams offer excellent trout habitat, with wild brown trout and native brook trout known to be present.

The original homestead foundation still evident in one of the meadows near the north entrance. A short trail leads from the foundation to the remains of five large charcoal kilns.

Rules For Use

The Lewis Preserve Wildlife Management Area is open year-round for hunting, fishing, hiking, trapping and other forms of wildlife enjoyment. in accordance with the Environmental Conservation Law and regulations. Please check the annual syllabus for season dates and regulations.

Boundaries and parking areas are clearly marked and any special regulations are conspicuously posted at all access points.

The following actions are prohibited: swimming, overnight camping, fires, and the use of all motorized vehicles or motorized water conveyances unless specifically stated.

Please Observe Good Outdoor Manners: If You Carry It In, Carry It Out

Habitat

The entire area is upland except for limited wet areas and beaver flows along several brooks. There are several open fields along the Jerusalem Road on the south boundary, and several more at the north end.

The southern portion of the area except for the fields is predominantly second growth forest with aspen, birch, spruce and balsam fir. There are a few northern hardwood areas of yellow birch, hard maple, white ash and beech with some soft maple, hemlock and white cedar along moist stream corridors.

The north portion, except for the stream corridors, is overgrown pasture land dominated by aspen, white birch and apple trees. Stone fences are noticeable throughout the woods.

Wildlife

Some wildlife species present include ruffed grouse, whitetail deer, black bear, snowshoe hare, fisher, coyote, raccoon, beaver, cottontail rabbit, wild turkey, and a wide variety of avian predators, songbirds and small mammals. Nest boxes for bluebirds have been erected along the edges of open areas. Moose tracks were observed in 1996.

Directions

From the north: Take State Route 190 to the Alder Bend Road.

  • Take the Alder Bend Road south 2.6 miles to Terrien Road. Turn left onto Terrien Road and take it 0.7 miles to a parking area and yellow gate at its end.
  • Take the Alder Bend Road south 5.4 miles to Jerusalem Road. Turn left onto Jerusalem Road. Three parking areas are located on Jerusalem Road.
    • The first parking area is on the left 0.2 mile from Alder Bend Road;
    • The second parking area is on the left 0.4 mile from Alder Bend Road and
    • The third parking area is a grassy area next to a large DEC sign 0.7 mile from Alder Bend Road.

From the south: Take State Route 374 to the Plank Road (County Route 8). Take Plank Road north 2.3 miles to Alder Bend Road.

  • Take the Alder Bend Road north 1.8 miles to Jerusalem Road. Turn right onto Jerusalem Road. Three parking areas are located on Jerusalem Road.
    • The first parking area is on the left 0.2 mile from Alder Bend Road;
    • The second parking area is on the left 0.4 mile from Alder Bend Road and
    • The third parking area is a grassy area next to a large DEC sign 0.7 mile from Alder Bend Road.
  • Take the Alder Bend Road north 4.6 miles to Terrien Road. Turn right onto Terrien Road and take it 0.7 miles to a parking area and yellow gate at its end.

The Lewis Preserve WMA map shows the location of roads, parking areas and other facilities.