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Nanticoke Lake Multiple Use Area

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Nanticoke Lake MUA locator map

The Nanticoke Lake Multiple Use Area covers 338 acres. There is a 46-acre man-made lake impoundment on the property. A tributary of Nanticoke Creek passes through the property. There are no trails on this forest.

The dam was constructed after the State acquired the land. The lake was created for flood control purposes and non-motorized recreation. Camping is not permitted at Nanticoke Multiple Use Area.

Featured Activities



General information on hiking includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

daisies in bloom

No formal trails exist through the forested areas, but access is good due to extensive firewood trails. These trails were created by firewood cutters who purchase wood from the State. DEC foresters mark the trees to be sold for thinning purposes to promote future timber growth.



General information on paddling includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.



General information on fishing includes how-to and safety tips and links to seasons, rules & regulations.

The lake is stocked with trout in spring. Fishing Access for the area is available. Fishing Easement information for the area is available.

Hunting & Trapping


General Information on hunting and general information on trapping includes how-to and safety tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations.


General information on animals includes links to information about birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians and insects that inhabit or migrate through the state.

This forest is a great place to see herons, ducks and geese. It is a favorite stopover for migrating loons in spring.


Access to the area is gained by traveling west from the village of Lisle on Rte. 79 to Center Lisle. Turn left onto Caldwell Hill Road, then right onto Squedunk Road. The parking area is on the right. The lake is a quarter-mile walk north from the parking area.

Squedunk Road Parking (42.327352°N, 76.091209°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Rules, Regulations and Outdoor Safety

Practice Leave No Trace (leaves DEC website) principles when recreating on state land to enjoy the outdoors responsibly, minimize impact on the natural resources and avoid conflicts with other users.

All users of Nanticoke Lake Multiple Use Area must follow all State Land Use Regulations and should follow all Outdoor Safety Practices for the safety of the user and protection of the resource.

How We Manage Nanticoke Lake Multiple Use Area

Nanticoke Lake Multiple Use Area is part of the Long Pond Unit Management Plan. A Unit Management Plan (UMP) guides the DEC's land management activities on several geographically related forests for a ten-year period, although a number of goals and objectives in the plan focus on a much longer time period. Each UMP addresses specific objectives and actions for public use and forest management. A copy of the UMP is available at the Lands and Forests Office in Sherburne. If you have questions and/or comments about this UMP, please email us

The forest surrounding Nanticoke Lake contains a wide array of different cover types. The types include Northern hardwood, Northern hardwood-hemlock, Northern hardwood-white pine and oak. The elevation of the area ranges from 1400 to 1500 feet above sea level. The forest has received various management treatments including: firewood harvests, wildlife shrub planting, and shade release for apple trees and blueberry bushes.

Nearby Amenities and Attractions

Turkey Hill State Forest

Broome County Tourism Webpage (Leaves DEC website)

Gas, food, dining and lodging may be found may be found in the nearby community of Whitney Point.

Numerous guide books and maps are available with information on the lands, waters, trails and other recreational facilities in this area. These can be purchased at most outdoor equipment retailers, bookstores, and on-line booksellers.

Additional information, outdoor equipment, trip suggestions and guided or self-guided tours may be obtained from outdoor guide and outfitting businesses. Check area chambers of commerce, telephone directories or search the internet for listings.

Consider hiring an outdoor guide if you have little experience or woodland skills. See the NYS Outdoor Guides Association (leaves DEC website) for information on outdoor guides.