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Moose River Plains Complex

Moose River Plains Wild Forest, Moose River Plains Camping Corridor & Little Moose Wilderness

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Moose River Plains Wild Forest locator map

The 79,487-acre Moose River Plains Complex is part of the Adirondack Forest Preserve and includes the 64,322-acre Moose River Plains Wild Forest, the 2,907-acre Moose River Plains Camping Corridor and the 12,258-acre Little Moose Wilderness.

The Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (a.k.a. the Moose River Plains Road) is a seasonal access road which extends 23 miles through the Moose River Plains from the Limekiln Gate in the west (near the community of Inlet) to the Wakely Dam Gate at the end of the Cedar River Road in the east (near the community of Indian Lake). The road serves as the main access to the lands and waters of this Complex and the intensive use Camping Corridor. The road is a primary snowmobile route in winter.

View of a waterbody and some trees

The area contains low‐lying river valleys, hills and low mountains and a couple of 3,500-foot high mountain summits - Little Moose Mountain and Manbury Mountain in the Little Moose Wilderness. The lands are a transitional zone between the high mountain country to the east and north and the foothills to the west and south.

More than 65 ponds and lakes border or are located within the unit, totaling approximately 3,500 acres. About 100 miles of brooks, streams and rivers drain into three major watersheds - the Raquette River, the Hudson River and the South Branch Moose River. Sections of the South Branch Moose River, Otter Brook, Red River and Cedar River are designated scenic rivers.

The area features more than 100 primitive roadside campsites, miles of marked trails and numerous lakes and ponds. The Moose River Plains are an ideal destination for visitors with varied interests and abilities.

Trail Information for the Central and Southern Adirondacks provides general information regarding backcountry and seasonal conditions; specific notices regarding closures and conditions of trails, roads, bridges and other infrastructure; and links to weather, state land use regulations, low impact recreation and more.

Featured Activities

Hiking

hiking

General information on hiking includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

There are approximately 130 miles of marked, maintained trails within the Moose River Plains Complex.

Rocky Mountain (2,220 feet) Trail ascends 450 feet and 0.5 miles, from a trailhead along State Route 28 to ledges on Rocky Mountain. This popular trail is a short, steep climb to an open view of the Fulton Chain Lakes.

Black Bear Mountain (2,425 feet) - The summit of the mountain can be reached using two different trails:

  • Black Bear Mountain Trail extends 1.9 miles and climbs 670 feet from the trailhead near the Rocky Mountain Trailhead. Also known as the Old Black Bear Mountain Trail, the trail follows the yellow ski trail for 0.7 miles east of the trailhead then continues as a blue marked foot trail east over steep terrain for an additional 1.2 miles to the summit.

  • Black Bear Mountain Uncas Trail extends 2.2 miles and climbs 700 feet from the trailhead on Uncas Road to the summit. The trail follows the Bug Lake Trail for 0.9 miles, then heads west on a yellow marked foot trail for 1.3 miles to the summit.

Bug Lake Trail extends 3.2 miles from Uncas Road to Eighth Lake Campground. The trail connects with the Black Bear Mountain Uncas Trail at mile 0.9, the Mike Norris Trail at 2.0 miles, and the Seventh Lake Trail at 2.5 miles. The trail passes Bug Lake and Eagles Nest Lake, between intersections with the Mike Norris Trail and the Seventh Lake Trail.

Mike Norris Trail extends 2.5 miles between the Bug Lake Trail and the Brown Tract Canoe Carry Trail. A 0.75-mile spur trail which leaves the trail 0.8 miles from the intersection with the canoe carry provides access to a lean-to on the western shore of Eighth Lake. Another lean-to on the shore of the lake is located near the intersection of this trail and the canoe carry.

Seventh Lake Trail extends 1.3 miles from the Bug Lake Trail along the northern shore of Seventh Lake. Two lean-tos are located along the trail.

Sucker Brook Bay Trail extends 3.1 miles along an old wagon road, from Uncas Road (Brown's Tract Road) to Sucker Brook Bay on Raquette Lake. The trail is the boundary of the Pigeon Lake Wilderness. The first mile of this trail follows the western edge of the Brown Tract Pond Campground. Leaving the campground boundary, the trail continues northerly for 1.4 miles to Beaver Brook, then easterly for another 0.9 miles ending at Sucker Brook Bay.

Shallow Lake Trail leaves the Sucker Brook Trail 0.9 miles from the trailhead and heads west into the Pigeon Lake Wilderness for 1.2 miles to the shore of Shallow Lake.

West Mountain (2,900 feet) Trail ascends 1,130 feet and extends 4.8 miles from Uncas Road to the summit of West Mountain. The trail proceeds north from the Uncas Road trailhead a distance of 1.4 miles and joins the Sucker Brook Bay Trail near Beaver Brook crossing. Both trails share a distance of 0.8 miles before the West Mountain Trail turns north into the Pigeon Lake Wilderness for an additional 2.6 miles to the summit of the mountain.

Cathedral Pines Trail is a 0.1-mile loop on the north side of State Route 28 through a stand of large old growth white pines.

The trails associated with Camp Sagamore on Sagamore Road are in the Blue Ridge Wilderness and include:

  • Sagamore Lake Trail is a 3.8-mile loop trail around the shores of Sagamore Lake.

  • Cascades Trail is a 1.5-mile trail along the western bank of the South Inlet of Raquette Lake.

  • Powerhouse Trail is a 1.6-mile trail along the eastern bank of the South Inlet of Raquette Lake.

Beaver Flow Trail is a 1.5-mile loop from the parking area at Camp Sagamore back to Sagamore Road near the bridge over the outlet of Sagamore Lake.

Traveling Rock Trail extends 0.2 miles from the Mohegan Lake Trail to Mohegan Lake Road.

Mohegan Lake Trail extends 1.1 miles from the Camp Sagamore parking area to Bear Pond Road near Uncas Farm Meadow.

Old Uncas Road Trail extends 7.2 miles between two trailheads along State Route 28 - one across from the Seventh Lake Boat Launch and the other across from the Eighth Lake Campground. The Mohegan Lake Trail leaves the Old Uncas Road Trail 2.7 miles from the Eighth Lake Campground Trailhead.

Seventh Lake Mountain Trail extends 12.8 miles between the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road and the Sagamore Road. It connects with the Old Uncas Road Trail near each of the State Route 28 trailheads.

Fawn Lake Trail extends 2.7 miles from the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road to the southern shore of Limekiln Lake.

Whites Pond Trail extends 3.2 miles from Rock Dam Road to the southeastern shore of Limekiln Lake. At mile 1.7, the trail passes White Pond.

Rock Dam Trail extends 1.4 miles from the end of Rock Dam Road to the confluence of the South Branch of the Moose River and the Red River.

Mitchell Pond Trail extends 3.8 miles from Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road and bows back to Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road. At the halfway point, there is a spur trail that extends 0.8 miles to the west side of Mitchell Pond.

Bear Pond Trail extends 2.6 miles from Loop Road off Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road to Bear Pond.

Icehouse Pond Trail is an accessible trail that extends 0.4 miles from Otter Brook Road to the southeastern shore of Icehouse Pond where an accessible campsite and accessible hand launch are located.

Beaver Lake Trail extends 2.1 miles from Otter Brook Road to the northern shore of Beaver Lake. The trail follows an old road to the northern shore of the lake.

Sly Pond Trail extends 8.1 miles into the Little Moose Mountain Wilderness from a trailhead on Otter Brook Road to Sly Pond, climbing 590 feet in the last mile before dropping to the western shore of the pond.

Sly Pond Road Trail extends 0.6 miles into the Little Moose Mountain Wilderness from a trailhead off Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road near Campsite 34 before it joins the Sly Pond Trail. It is another 5.0 miles on the Sly Pond trail to reach the western shore of the pond.

Otter Brook Trail extends 10 miles, following the boundary between the Little Moose Mountain Wilderness and the West Canada Lake Wilderness, from Otter Brook Road to Little Moose Lake. At mile 6.3 the trail connects to the Lost Pond Trail, which leads to the West Canada Lake Wilderness. At Little Moose Lake the end of the Otter Brook Trail connects to the Wilson Ridge Trail.

Squaw Lake Trail extends 0.4 miles from Indian Lake Road to the eastern shore of Squaw Lake.

Two people standing on the edge of Helldiver Pond
Helldiver Pond

Indian Lake Trail extends 2.4 miles from the end of Indian Lake Road to Indian Lake. The trail follows the section of former Indian Lake Road that is now closed to motor vehicles. A short spur trail, leading to the shore of Indian Lake and a campsite, leaves the trail just before it becomes the Indian River Trail.

Helldiver Pond Accessible Trail extends 0.2 miles from the trailhead at the end of Helldiver Pond Road to an accessible hand launch on the shore of the pond. An accessible campsite is located near the trailhead.

Lost Ponds Trail extends 1.2 miles from the end of a short access road off the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road to the western shore of Lost Ponds. A designated tent site is located on the shore and two other tent sites are located along the trail.

Wilson Ridge Trail extends 3.2 miles from Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road to Little Moose Lake where it connects to the Otter Brook Trail.

Cellar Pond Trail extends 2.3 miles and climbs 385 feet from Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road to the southern shore of Cellar Pond.

Wakely Mountain Trail (3,744 feet) ascends 1,600 feet and 3.0 miles from the trailhead to the summit. The trailhead is located in the Moose River Plains but most of the trail and the summit of the mountain are located in the Blue Ridge Wilderness. The beginning portion of this trail follows an old road northwesterly for approximately 1.0 mile passing by the site of an old camp. This part of the foot trail to Wakely Mountain is in very poor condition. The last 0.5-mile section to the summit is steep. At the summit is the Wakely Mountain Fire Tower.

Northville‐Placid Trail (NPT) is a 133-mile foot trail that runs through the Adirondacks from Northville to Lake Placid.

  • Wakely Dam Trailhead provides access to the portion of the NPT in the West Canada Lake Wilderness to the south.

  • Wakely Pond Trailhead provides access to the portion of the NPT in the Blue Ridge Wilderness to the south.

  • Through-hikers need to travel 1.1 miles along the Cedar River road between the two trailheads.

Gould Road Trail is a 0.2-mile road on which people with a valid Motorized Access Program for People With Disabilities (MAPPWD) permit can use a motor vehicle to access the designated parking area. A hardened trail from the parking area leads to an accessible tent site on the shore of Wakely Pond.

Camping

primitive camping

General information on backcountry camping includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

Camping is a very popular activity in the Moose River Plains Complex. All of the campsites are considered "primitive" as neither electricity nor running water is available. Campsites are available on a first come-first served basis and cannot be reserved.

There are 116 primitive roadside campsites located along the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road, Otter Brook Road, Rock Dam Road and short spur roads off of them. Roadside campsites are numbered and most have a picnic table, fireplace and privy.

Eight of the roadside campsites are accessible with accessible designed picnic tables, fireplaces and privies. Campers without disabilities are encouraged to use other campsites to ensure the accessible campsites are available to people who require them.

Numerous designated interior primitive tent sites are located in the Moose River Plains, most of them on the shores of various water bodies. The location of these campsites can be identified by the presence of a yellow "Camp Here" disc. Most these campsites are accessed via hiking trails and have only a fire ring and a pit privy.

Indian Lake Tent Site can be accessed via a short spur trail that leaves the Indian Lake Trail near where it joins the Indian River Trail.

Beaver Lake Tent Site can be access via the 2.1-mile Beaver Lake Trail.

Sly Pond Tent Site can be access via the 8.1-mile Sly Pond Trail or the 5.6 mile Sly Pond Road Trail.

Lost Ponds Tent Site can be accessed via the 1.2-mile Lost Pond Trail. Two other tent sites are located along the trail.

Helldiver Pond Accessible Tent Site is located along the Helldiver Pond Accessible Trail, not far from trailhead.

Mitchell Pond Tent Site is located on Mitchell Pond West, 1.9 miles from Otter Brook Road.

Cedar River Flow Tent Sites (10) are accessed from the Wakely Dam Trailhead. Campsite 1 is an accessible site.

Wakely Pond Accessible Tent Site is located down an accessible path off the 0.2-mile Gould Pond Trail.

Icehouse Pond Tent Sites (2) can be accessed via the Icehouse Pond Accessible Trail. One of the tent sites is an accessible site.

The Moose River Plains Complex features nine lean-tos. All of the lean-tos have fireplaces and pit privies.

Seventh Lake Lean-tos (3) - two lean-tos are located on the northern shore of the lake along the Seventh Lake Trail. The third lean-to (Arnold Rock) is located on an island at the east end of the lake.

Eighth Lake Lean-tos (3) - all three lean-tos are located along the western shore of the lake. One is located along the shore but can only be accessed by water. One is on an island and can only be accessed by water. The most northern one can be accessed via the Mike Norris Trail near where it joins the canoe carry.

Raquette Lake Lean-tos (3) - all three lean-tos are located on the western shore of Raquette Lake in Beaver Bay and can only be accessed by water. Additional lean-tos are located on islands in the Sargent Ponds Wild Forest.

Paddling

paddling

General information on paddling includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

Paddling is a popular activity in the Moose River Plains Complex. Paddling is allowed on all the waters in the area, however some are more easily accessed than others.

The 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) (leaves DEC website) links the waterways of New York, Vermont, Québec, New Hampshire and Maine, and includes the Fulton Chain of Lakes, Raquette Lake and the carry (portage) trails between them.

The 90-mile Adirondack Canoe Route is the section of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail between the communities of Old Forge and Saranac Lake, including the portions in and near the Moose River Plains Complex.

The annual Adirondack Canoe Classic (a.k.a. the 90 miler) (leaves DEC website) is held the weekend after Labor Day. The 3-day race follows the Adirondack Canoe Route.

Accessible hand launches provided for people of every level of ability are located on:

View of quiet pond with pine trees
Wakely Pond
  • Cedar River Flow
  • Wakely Pond
  • Icehouse Pond
  • Helldiver Pond

Lower Brown Tract Pond can be accessed from a hand launch in Brown Tract Pond Campground.

Paddlers can also use the boat launches used by boaters.

Three carry trails (portages) connect the lakes along this portion of the Adirondack Canoe Route.

Fifth Lake-Sixth Lake Canoe Carry Trail extends 0.5 miles between the two lakes and is necessary as the flow between them is too small. The take out on Fifth Lake utilizes the remains of an old boat slip. The carry continues along an old town road (Jasper Day trail) to State Route 28 and along the highway to Sixth Lake Road. The put-in on Sixth Lake is adjacent to a man-made dam. The site on Sixth Lake can be difficult to use when the water levels are low, increasing the drop from the top of the wall to the water.

Seventh Lake-Eighth Lake Canoe Carry Trail extends 0.5 miles, passing through Eighth Lake Campground.

Brown Tract Canoe Carry Trail extends one mile between Eighth Lake and Brown Tract Inlet. The last 0.2-mile section containing the boardwalk is designated for canoe carry only. Brown Tract Inlet flows into Raquette Lake.

Mechanically propelled vessels are prohibited from the following waters:

  • Beaver Lake
  • Helldiver Pond
  • Icehouse Pond
  • Indian Lake
  • Lost Ponds
  • Lower Brown Tract Pond
  • Lower and Upper Mitchell Ponds
  • Squaw Lake

Boating

boating

General information on boating includes how-to and safety tips with links to rules & regulations.

Boating is a popular activity on the Fulton Chain of Lakes. Three boat launches in the area provide access for trailered boats and hand launched watercraft.

Seventh Lake Boat Launch provides access to Seventh Lake and Sixth Lake.

Eighth Lake Boat Launch is located at Eighth Lake Campground. A day use fee is required to launch boats during the camping season.

Limekiln Lake Boat Launch is located at Limekiln Lake Campground. A day use fee is required to launch boats during the camping season.

Raquette Lake Boat Launch is located at Golden Beach Campground in the nearby Sargent Ponds Wild Forest. A day use fee is required to launch boats during the camping season.

Mechanically propelled vessels are prohibited from the following waters:

  • Beaver Lake
  • Helldiver Pond
  • Icehouse Pond
  • Indian Lake
  • Lost Ponds
  • Lower Brown Tract Pond
  • Lower and Upper Mitchell Ponds
  • Squaw Lake

Biking

biking

General information on mountain biking includes how-to and safety tips with links to rules & regulations.

Biking is allowed on all roads and trails except for those in the Little Moose Mountain Wilderness where biking is prohibited. The extensive network of seasonal access roads and snowmobile trails coupled with the lack of steep terrain makes this a popular location for biking.

The annual Black Fly Challenge bike race between the communities of Inlet and Indian Lake is held the second Saturday in June. More than half of the 40-mile course is on roads in the Moose River Plains Complex.

Popular mountain bike trails in the area include:

The 22-mile Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road is a seasonal access road which runs through the Moose River Plains Complex and can be used with other roads and highways to travel between Inlet and Indian Lake.

Seventh Lake Mountain Trail extends 12.8 miles between Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road and Sagamore Road.

Old Uncas Road Trail extends 7.2 miles between two trailheads along State Route 28 - one across from the Seventh Lake Boat Launch and the other across from Eighth Lake Campground.

Mohegan Lake Trail leaves the Old Uncas Road Trail 2.7 miles from the Eighth Lake Campground Trailhead and connects with Mohegan Lake Road then Sagamore Road.

Bug Lake Trail extends 3.2 miles between Uncas Road and Eighth Lake Campground through which bikers can connect to the Seventh Lake Mountain Trail.

Mike Norris Trail extends 2.5 miles between the Bug Lake Trail and Uncas Road.

Otter Brook Trail extends 6.6 miles from the trailhead located at the end of Otter Brook Road. The trail follows along the Otter Brook and the West Canada Lake Wilderness boundary.

In addition to the trails, bikers can use Uncas Road, Sagamore Road and State Route 28 to create long distance cycling trips.

Horseback Riding

horseback riding

General information on horseback riding includes safety tips and rules & regulations.

The Moose River Plains Complex features six designated horse trails totaling nearly 35 miles:

  • Seventh Lake Mountain Trail - 13.1 miles

  • Lost Ponds Trail - 2.0 miles

  • Mitchell Ponds Trail - 1.8 miles

  • Beaver Lake Trail - 2.3 miles

  • Sly Pond Loop Trail - 5.4 miles

  • Otter Brook Trail - 10.1 miles between Otter Brook Road and Wakely Dam

All motor vehicle roads and snowmobile trails, when not covered with ice or snow, are also open for public equestrian use. Proof of current negative Coggins certificate is required for all horses and out-of-state horse owners are required to produce a 30-day health certificate.

Riding is prohibited in the Limekiln Lake Campground and other trails specifically marked as foot travel only.

There are no parking areas designated for parking horse trailers, however many parking areas can accommodate such use.

Fishing

fishing

General information on fishing includes fishing tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations.

The Moose River Complex provides a multitude of opportunities for trout and bass fishing. There are numerous popular fishing destinations in the area including the nearby Fulton Chain of Lakes.

Sixth Lake contains rainbow trout and lake trout, white sucker, brown bullhead, and pumpkinseed sunfish. The lake can be accessed from Seventh Lake.

Seventh Lake contains rainbow trout (stocked), lake trout, landlocked salmon, and smallmouth bass. The lake can be accessed via the DEC boat launch.

Eighth Lake contains rainbow trout (stocked), lake trout, landlocked salmon, smallmouth bass, and yellow perch. The lake can be accessed via the boat launch at Eighth Lake Campground.

Raquette Lake contains brook trout, lake trout, smallmouth bass, and northern pike and can be accessed via the DEC boat launch.

Limekiln Lake contains lake trout, brook trout, round whitefish, and pumpkinseed sunfish and can be accessed via the boat launch at Limekiln Lake Campground.

Ice fishing is allowed on Limekiln Lake, Sixth Lake and Seventh Lake.

Bear Pond contains brook trout and can be accessed via the 2.6-mile Bear Pond Trail. Use or possession of baitfish is prohibited.

Beaverdam Pond contains brook trout and can be accessed from Limekiln Lake Campground via the Limekiln Loop Trail.

Bug Lake contains lake trout, rainbow smelt, brook trout, and kokanee salmon. The endangered fish species, round whitefish, was reintroduced to this pond several years ago. Round whitefish must be returned if caught. The lake can be accessed using the Uncas Trail. Use or possession of baitfish is prohibited.

Cedar River Flow contains brown trout and can be accessed via the DEC boat launch at Wakely Dam.

Family fishing at the Cedar River flow dam
Cedar River Flow fishing access

Eagle Nest Lake contains brook trout and can be accessed via the Uncas Trail.

Icehouse Pond contains brook trout and can be accessed via a 0.4-mile accessible trail and accessible hand launch. An accessible campsite is located near the pond. Use or possession of baitfish is prohibited.

Lost Ponds contain brook trout and can be accessed via the 0.6-mile Lost Ponds Trail. Use or possession of baitfish is prohibited.

Little Moose Lake contains brook trout and can be accessed via Otter Brook Trail. The trail crosses the inlet to the lake approximately 5.0 miles from the Wakely Dam Trailhead. Use or possession of baitfish is prohibited.

Lower and Upper Mitchell Ponds contain brown trout. The pond can be accessed from either of two trailheads off the Mitchell Ponds Trail. A trail along the northern shore of the ponds leaves the 4.0-mile Mitchell Ponds Trail at its midpoint.

Mohegan Lake contains lake trout, smallmouth bass and yellow perch. The lake can be accessed via the Mohegan Lake Road by foot or bicycle.

Squaw Lake contains brook trout and can be accessed via the 0.4-mile Squaw Lake Trail off the Indian Lake Road. Use or possession of baitfish is prohibited.

Trout fishing is available at many rivers and brooks located throughout the unit, though none are specifically identified here.

Adirondack/Lake Champlain Fishing provides information on fishing in the Adirondacks and links to top fishing waters, stocking lists, public fishing access and waters open to ice fishing listed by county.

Help Protect Native Adirondack Fish: populations of brook trout, round whitefish and other native Adirondack fish species have severely declined due to introduced fish.

Hunting and Trapping

hunting
trapping

General information on hunting and general information on trapping includes how-to and safety tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations.

Hunters and trappers may use the parking areas, roads, seasonal access roads, trailheads, and trails used by hikers, and the boat launches and hand launches used by boaters and paddlers to access the lands and waters in this area.

The area is popular with big game hunters who can camp in roadside campsites while pursuing white-tailed deer and black bear.

Furbearers found on the property include beaver, bobcat, coyote, fisher, and otter.

Snowmobiling

snowmobiling

General information on snowmobiling includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

The Moose River Plains Complex features a nearly 73-mile network of snowmobile routes divided almost equally between seasonal access roads and trails. The network connects to snowmobile trails outside the complex linking the communities of Indian Lake, Inlet and Raquette Lake.

The 22-mile Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road is open to snowmobiles once enough snow has fallen. It is the main route between Inlet and Indian Lake.

Seventh Lake Mountain Trail extends 12.8 miles between the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road and the Sagamore Road.

Bug Lake Trail extends 3.2 miles between Uncas Road and Eighth Lake Campground through which snowmobilers can connect to the Seventh Lake Mountain Trail.

Mike Norris Trail extends 2.5 miles between the Bug Lake Trail and Dillon Road in the community of Raquette Lake.

The C8, S81A, S81B, S81C, S82, and S84 snowmobile corridors are in or pass through the Moose River Plains Complex.

The town of Inlet plows the parking area of the Seventh Lake Boat Launch for parking of vehicles and snowmobile trailers.

Paid private parking is available for vehicles and trailers on Cedar River Road approximately 6 miles east of State Route 30. Look for signs on the right.

Free parking for vehicles and snowmobile trailers is also available in the Village of Indian Lake off Pelon Road.

Cross-country Skiing and Snowshoeing

cross-country skiing
snowshoeing

General information on cross-country skiing and snowshoeing includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

Cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are permitted on all hiking trails, and nearly 16 miles of trails within the Moose River Plains Complex have been designated for skiing only.

Black Bear Mountain Ski Trails are popular with skiers and snowshoers as they are not open to snowmobiles.

  • Black Bear Mountain Upper Ski Trail extends 2.2 miles from the trailhead near the Rocky Mountain Trailhead around the north side of Black Bear Mountain to the Bug Lake-Black Bear Mountain Trail. The first 0.7-mile portion of this trail is also marked with yellow foot trail markers. The 1.5-mile section to the east has some wet areas.

  • Black Bear Mountain Lower Ski Trail extends 3.0 miles from private land along State Route 28 to the Bug Lake Trail. The trail follows for 0.4 miles along an easement over private land and continues easterly for 2.6 miles. Wet areas make portions of the trail unsuitable for use during non-winter seasons.

  • A 5.8-mile loop using both trails is possible but it requires skiing the 0.6 miles between the two trailheads on a busy snowmobile trail along State Route 28 or walking on the shoulder of State Route 28.

Third Lake Creek Trail extends 5.0 miles from a trailhead on South Shore Road in the Fulton Chain Wild Forest to the Old Dam Nature Trail in Limekiln Lake Campground.

Limekiln Loop Trail is a 3-mile loop trail starts and ends in Limekiln Lake Campground.

Fern Park Trails - Fern Park is operated by the Town of Inlet. There are 13 miles of groomed track set trails ranging from beginner to advanced with approximately one mile lighted for night skiing. Fern Park offers trail connections to additional ski trails in the Moose River Complex, Limekiln Lake Campground and Inlet Golf Course.

Wildlife Viewing

General information on animals includes links to information about birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians and insects that inhabit or migrate through the state.

The Adirondacks contain large tracts of wildlife habitat with some boreal, bog, alpine and other unique habitats. Many birds (common loon, peregrine falcon) and mammals (moose, black bear) are unique to the Adirondacks or are mainly found here. More than 50 species of mammals and hundreds of species of birds inhabit or pass through the Adirondacks at one time of the year or another.

Accessible Features

accessible

General information on accessible recreation includes links to other locations with accessible recreation opportunities and information on permits for motorized access.

Moose River Plains Complex contains a significant amount of accessible infrastructure to provide access to the ponds, campsites and some remote areas.

Photo of an accessible picnic table and fireplace
Accessible campsite amenities (privy
not shown)

Roadside Campsites

There are eight accessible designated roadside campsites with compacted stone dust surfaces, accessible privies, picnic tables and fireplaces, and hardened tent pads. Campsites are available on a first-come first served basis and cannot be reserved. The accessible roadside campsites are:

  • Site 1 at Cedar River entrance
  • Site 7 on Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road, 6 miles west of Cedar River entrance
  • Site 34 on Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road, 9 miles west of Cedar River entrance
  • Site 66 on Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road, 0.5 miles north of Otter Brook Road intersection
  • Site 73 on Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road, 0.9 miles east of Rock Dam Road intersection
  • Site 90 off Otter Brook Road near Beaver Lake access road
  • Site 119a on Rock Dam Road, 0.5 miles from the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road
  • Site 130 on Rock Dam Road, 2.5 miles from the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road

Wakely Pond

Wakely Pond has an accessible hand launch and an accessible campsite. The campsite includes an accessible picnic table, fire ring and pit privy. A short hardened path leads to the shore of the pond and an accessible wooden dock can be used for fishing or launching a canoe or kayak. Parking is available off Gould Road.

Accessible path through the forest
Hardened path to Helldiver Pond

Helldiver Pond

Helldiver Pond has a 0.4-mile accessible path which leads to an accessible campsite and an accessible hand launch. The campsite includes an accessible picnic table, fire ring and pit privy. A hardened path from the campsite meanders one-tenth of a mile through the forest to the shore of the pond. An accessible wooden dock located there can be used for fishing or launching a canoe or kayak. Parking is available at the end of Helldiver Road right near the accessible campsite.

Icehouse Pond

Icehouse Pond has a 0.4-mile accessible path which leads to an accessible campsite and an accessible hand launch. The campsite includes an accessible picnic table, fire ring and pit privy. A short hardened path leads to the shore of the pond and an accessible wooden dock can be used for fishing or launching a canoe or kayak. Parking is available at the Icehouse Pond trailhead.

Accessible path through a forest clearing
Hardened path to Icehouse Pond

Cedar River Flow

Cedar River Flow has an accessible hand launch and shoreline fishing area at the dam. A designated accessible parking space is available for each. The accessible campsite at Site 1 is nearby.

Directions

Trailheads and Parking Areas

  • Rocky Mountain-Black Bear Mountain Trailhead Parking is located off State Route 28 (43.7645°N, 74.7938°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Bug Lake-Black Bear Mountain Trailhead is located along Uncas Road (43.7821°N, 74.5780°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Sucker Brook Bay Trailhead is located along Uncas Road (43.8010°N, 74.7055°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • West Mountain Trailhead is located along Uncas Road (43.8165°N, 74.6730°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Cathedral Pines Trailhead is located along State Route 28 (43.7558°N, 74.7138°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Sagamore Road Parking Area is located on Sagamore Road, opposite Camp Sagamore (43.7633°N, 74.6312°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Seventh Lake Mountain Sagamore Trailhead is located along Sagamore Road on the west side of the road approximately 1.5 miles south of State Route 28 (43.796°N, 74.647°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Seventh Lake Mountain Moose River Plains Trailhead is located along Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road on the east side of the road, approximately 2.5 miles south of the Limekiln Lake Campground entrance gate (43.708°N, 74.756°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Old Uncas Road Eighth Lake Trailhead is located along State Route 28 (43.7649°N, 74.7043°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Old Uncas Road Seventh Lake Trailhead is located along State Route 28 (43.7441°N, 74.7244°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Third Lake Creek Trailhead is located along South Shore Road (43.7263°N, 74.8866°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Limekiln Loop Trailhead is located at Limekiln Lake Campground (43.7200°N, 74.8118°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Fawn Lake Trailhead is located along Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.7040°N, 74.7627°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Whites Pond Trailhead is located along Rock Dam Road (43.6746°N, 74.7940°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Rock Dam Trailhead is located along Rock Dam Road (43.7313°N, 74.4729°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Mitchell Pond North Trailhead is located along Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.6898°N, 74.7512°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Mitchell Pond South Trailhead is located at the end of a short spur road off the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.6761°N, 74.7096°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Bear Pond Trailhead is located along a side road off the Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.6896°N, 74.7379°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Beaver Lake Trailhead is located at the end of a short spur road off the Otter Brook Road (43.6584°N, 74.7048°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Icehouse Pond Trailhead is located along Otter Brook Road (43.6612°N, 74.7090°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Sly Pond Trailhead is located along Otter Brook Road (43.6574°N, 74.6761°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Sly Pond Road Trailhead is located along Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.6841°N, 74.6348°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Otter Brook Trailhead is located along Otter Brook Road (43.6521°N, 74.6755°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Squaw Lake Trailhead is located along Indian Lake Road (43.6344°N, 74.7256°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Indian Lake Trailhead is located at the barrier at the end of the Indian Lake Road (43.6317°N, 74.7321°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Helldiver Pond Accessible Trailhead is located along Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.6732°N, 74.6941°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Lost Ponds Trailhead is located at the end of a short spur road off Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.6837°N, 74.6614°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Wilson Ridge Trailhead is located along Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.7028°N, 74.5846°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Cellar Pond Trailhead is located along Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.7067°N, 74.5306°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Wakely Dam Parking Area is located on Cedar River Road, 0.4 miles southwest of the Wakely Mountain Trailhead Parking Area (43.7272°N, 74.4738°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Wakely Mountain Trailhead Parking Area is located off Cedar River Road (43.7313°N, 74.4729°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Wakely Pond-Gould Road Trailhead is located along Cedar River Road (43.7387°N, 74.4626°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Boat Launches and Hand Launches

  • Helldiver Pond Accessible Hand Launch is located at the end of a path off a short spur road off of Limekiln Lake-Cedar River Road (43.6696°N, 74.6963°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Icehouse Pond Accessible Hand Launch is located at the end of a path off the end of a short spur road off of Otter Brook Road (43.6647°N, 74.7028°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Cedar River Flow Accessible Hand Launch and Accessible Fishing Dock are located off the Cedar River Road (43.7272°N, 74.4735°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

  • Wakely Pond Accessible Hand Launch and Fishing Dock are located off the Cedar River Road (43.7405°N, 74.4658°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Rules, Regulations and Outdoor Safety

Practice Leave No Trace principles (leaves DEC website) when recreating in the Adirondacks to enjoy the outdoors responsibly, minimize impact on the natural resources and avoid conflicts other backcountry users.

All users of Moose River Plains Complex must follow all State Land Use Regulations and should follow all Outdoor Safety Practices for the safety of the user and protection of the resource.

A camping permit is required for groups of 10 or more or for stays of 3 or more nights at one location. Contact the local Forest Ranger at 1-877-457-5680 to obtain a permit.

How We Manage Moose River Plains Complex

DEC manages these lands in accordance with the management activities described in the Moose River Plains Wild Forest Unit Management Plan. In addition to management objectives, the UMP contains detailed information on natural features, recreational infrastructure, geology, natural and human history, habitats, wildlife, fisheries and much more.

Nearby State Lands, Facilities, Amenities & Other Information

Gas can be found in the nearby communities of Indian Lake, Inlet and Raquette Lake.

Food and other supplies can be found in the nearby communities of Indian Lake, Inlet and Old Forge.

Dining opportunities can be found in the nearby communities of Indian Lake, Inlet, Old Forge, Raquette Lake, and Eagle Bay.

Lodging can be found in the nearby communities of Blue Mountain Lake, Indian Lake, Inlet and Old Forge.

Adirondack Regional Tourism Council (leaves DEC website), Herkimer County Tourism (leaves DEC website), and Hamilton County Tourism (leaves DEC website) can provide information about other recreation, attractions and amenities in this area.

Numerous guide books and maps are available with information on the lands, waters, trails and other recreational facilities in this area. These can be purchased at most outdoor equipment retailers, bookstores, and on-line booksellers.

Additional information, outdoor equipment, trip suggestions and guided or self-guided tours may be obtained from outdoor guide and outfitting businesses. Check area chambers of commerce, telephone directories or search the internet for listings.

Consider hiring an outdoor guide if you have little experience or woodland skills. See the NYS Outdoor Guides Association (leaves DEC website) for information on outdoor guides.