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Tidal Wetlands Categories

Tidal wetlands are the areas where the land meets the sea. These areas are periodically flooded by seawater during high or spring tides or, are affected by the cyclic changes in water levels caused by the tidal cycle. Salt marshes and mud flats are some typical types of tidal wetlands found along New York's marine shoreline. Tidal wetlands are classified by the amount of water covering the area at high and low tides and the type of vegetation. New York State uses specific categories and codes to describe and represent different types of coastal, tidal and fresh water wetlands. These codes and abbreviations (noted below) are used to identify wetlands on Tidal Wetlands Inventory Maps and help in administering program for their protection.

Shoals and Mudflats example2010 SM. Coastal Shoals, Bars and Mudflats The tidal wetland zone that at high tide is covered by saline or fresh tidal waters, at low tide is exposed or is covered by water to a maximum depth of approximately one foot, and is not vegetated. (ex: Stockport Creek, Hudson River, Stockport , NY)

2020 LZ. Littoral Zone The tidal wetland zone that includes all lands under tidal waters which are not included in any other category. There shall be no LZ under waters deeper than six feet at mean low water.

2030 FC. Formerly Connected The tidal wetlands zone in which normal tidal flow is restricted by man-made causes. Phragmites sp. is the dominant vegetation.

Vegetated Shoals example2200 SV. Vegetated Coastal Shoals, Bars and Mudflats The tidal wetland zone that at high tide is covered by saline or fresh tidal waters, at low tide is exposed or is covered by water to a maximum depth of approximately one foot, and is vegetated. (ex: Green Island, Hudson River, Albany, NY)

Broad Leaf vegetation example2500 BV. Broad-Leaf Vegetation The vegetated tidal wetlands zone that includes all lands that generally receive daily flushing from fresh tidal water. This area is generally lower than the graminoid vegetation area and is characterized by broad leaf emergent vegetation such as spatterdock, Nuphar sp., pickerelweed, Pontederia cordata and arrowleaf, Peltandra virginica among others. (ex: South of Coxsackie, Hudson River, NY)

Intertidal Marsh example3000 IM. Intertidal Marsh The vegetated tidal wetland zone lying generally between average high and low tidal elevation in saline waters. The predominant vegetation in this zone is low marsh cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora. (ex: Setauket Harbor, NY)

Fresh Marsh example3010. FM Fresh Marsh The tidal wetland zone found primarily in the upper tidal limits of the riverine systems where significant fresh water inflow dominates the tidal zone. Species normally associated with this zone include narrow leaved cattail, Typha angustifolia; the tall brackish water cordgrass, Spartina pectinata and/or S. cynosuroides; and the more typically emergent fresh water species such as arrow arum, Peltandra; pickerel weed, Pondederia; and cutgrass., Leersia. (ex: Papscanee Creek, Rensselaer, NY)

Graminoid Vegetation example3500 GV. Graminoid Vegetation The vegetated tidal wetlands zone that includes all lands that receive at least periodic flushing from fresh water. This area is generally higher than the broad leaf vegetation area. The lower elevated portions of this area may receive daily flushing and the higher elevations periodic flushing from storm tides. It is characterized by graminoid vegetation such as cattail, Typha angustifolia, bulrushes, Scirpus spp. and wild rice, Zizania aquatica. (ex: Greenport, Hudson River, NY)

High Marsh example4000 HM. High Marsh The normal upper most tidal wetland zone usually dominated by salt meadow grass, Spartina patens; and spike grass, Distichlis spicata. This zone is periodically flooded by spring and storm tides and is often vegetated by low vigor, Spartina alterniflora and Seaside lavender, Limonium carolinianum. Upper limits of this zone often include black grass, Juncus Gerardi; chairmaker's rush, Scirpus sp; marsh elder, Iva frutescens; and groundsel bush, Baccharis halimifolia.(ex: Great Peconic Bay, NY).

Swamp Shrub example4500 SS. Swamp Shrub includes all land that receives periodic inundation from tidal fresh waters and is characterized by shrubs such as alder (Alnus spp.), buttonbush (Cepahalanus occidentalis) bog rosemary (Andromeda glaucophylla), dogwoods (Cornus spp.), and leatherleaf (Chamaedaphne calyculata). (ex: Stuyvesant, Hudson River, NY).

Swamp Tree example4750 ST. Swamp Tree includes all land that receives periodic inundation from tidal fresh waters and is characterized by trees such as red maple (Acer rubrum), willows (Salix spp.) black ash (Fraxinus nigra). (ex: Green Island, Hudson River, Albany, NY).

4900 FR.Fern Marsh includes all land that receives periodic inundation from tidal fresh waters and is characterized by ferns such as cinnamon fern (Osmunda cinnamomea), marsh fern (Thelypterispalustris) and sensitive fern (Onoclea sensibilis).

5000 AA. Adjacent Area shall mean those land areas not included in the any of the above categories that are generally not inundated by tidal waters and that extend 300 feet landward of the most landward tidal wetlands boundary or to an elevation of ten feet (refer to Part 661 Tidal Wetlands Landuse Regulation).

5010 DS. Dredged Spoil All areas of fill material.

5031 TRD. Dead Tree Area Areas where dead trees are dominant

9000 DA. Default Area includes all areas awaiting classification into one of the above categories.