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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has added a link to a translation service developed by Microsoft Inc., entitled Bing Translator, as a convenience to visitors to the DEC website who speak languages other than English.

Additional information can be found at DEC's Language Assistance Page.

Climate Change Program for the Hudson River Estuary

A student stands near the river while measuring the effects of sea level rise.
High school students measure projected sea level rise at Marist
College (C. Bowser).

The Climate Change Program for the Hudson River Estuary helps communities to adapt to climate change and become more resilient to climate risks. On our page you can find:

What is Climate Resilience?

Climate resilience means our ability to manage climate risks, respond productively as the climate changes and recover quickly from extreme events. For examples, please visit our page on Hudson River Climate Resilience Case Studies.

What are our Climate Risks in the Hudson River Estuary?

The primary climate risks identified for this region include increased frequency and severity of:

  • Flooding, which can impact our waterfront properties and infrastructure
  • Heat waves, which can impact human health and agriculture
  • Short-term drought, which can impact our food and water supply

Please download our climate fact sheet (PDF 183 KB) for an overview of chimate change in the Hudson Valley and what you can do to help. If you are a municipality, please download our more detailed climate summary for communities (PDF 1.64 MB). You can also download our one-page overview of the latest climate projections for the Hudson Valley (PDF 34 KB).

Assistance Available for Climate Resilience

The Hudson River Estuary Program and our partners provide multiple opportunities for communities to receive assistance in improving their climate resilience by supporting our natural life support systems, like floodplains, forests and wetlands, in the valley. For example:

Is your community a Climate Smart Community?

A woman jogging along the river in New york City
What does climate resilience mean to you and your community?
(C. Bowser)

You can check by visiting the List of Climate Smart Communities. If it is, you have access to valuable technical assistance and more opportunities to save money, reduce greenhouse gases, and become climate resilient. If not, your community can take the pledge and start taking action now. Climate Smart Communities now has a certification program to recognize climate leaders. The program's guidance outlines over 100 of the most important actions communities can take to become Climate Smart.

Grants Relating to Climate Resilience

To check for available funding, please see the DEC's grants page, the Estuary Program's grants page and the Estuary Program's main page for our latest RFPs. Sign up for our newsletter to be alerted of the latest funding opportunities.

Green and Natural Infrastructure to Manage Stormwater

There are "green" alternatives to traditional "gray" infrastructure that are designed to mimic the natural processes that store and treat storm water runoff. Green stormwater infrastructure can help communities reduce water pollution and the effects of flooding under a changing climate. These systems provide a variety of benefits, including helping communities reduce energy use, improve air and water quality, increase property values, and provide wildlife habitat. Please visit our page on Green Infrastructure Examples for Stormwater Management in the Hudson Valley for more information. We are also working on a cost-benefit tool to allow decision makers to weigh the financial value of green infrastructure techniques, like permeable pavement. More details to come.

Green and Natural Infrastructure to Manage Shoreline Erosion and Flooding

Green infrastructure can also be applied to shorelines to reduce erosion and flooding. The Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines project provides case studies to document the use and benefits of ecologically-enhanced shorelines. Please click the link "Hudson River Sustainable Shorelines" found on the right.

Trees for Tribs to Restore Stream Buffers

Our Trees for Tribs program assists property owners in planting native trees, shrubs and grasses along Hudson River tributaries. This creates a stream buffer that can reduce flooding and improve water quality and wildlife habitat, ultimately helping us to maintain a healthy more climate-resilient watershed.

Right sizing Culverts

Many culverts in New York are too small to pass the amount of water coming to their streams from large storms, and some are even too small to fit the streamflow from average-size rainstorms. These undersized culverts can fail during storm events, exacerbating local flooding and increasing infrastructure costs. The Estuary Program works with municipalities to identify which culverts are the most undersized, so municipalities can invest in better infrastructure in the best places, benefiting the municipalities' bottom line and improving safety during large storms More information for how you can get involved is coming soon.

Watershed Resiliency Project

An educational project that focuses on climate change and watershed resiliency in the Hudson River estuary. Our partners at Cornell Cooperative Extension are working directly with municipal staff and landowners to understand and improve our ability to prevent and respond to flooding. For events and more information on this project, please click the link "Estuary Resiliency Project" found on the right.

What have other Communities done to become more Climate Resilient?

students around a map of the Hudson River Estuary's watershed
Cornell research students studying a map of the estuary at
Piermont Pier (E. Murphy)

For examples, please visit our page on Hudson River Climate Resilience Case Studies.

Also, view our Climate Smart Webinar on Adaptation Planning: Kingston Tidal Waterfront Flooding Task Force from January 9th, 2014.

How can I stay up-to-date with Climate Resilience in the Estuary?

Sign up for our newsletter: Climate Resilience in the Hudson River Estuary!

For Further Assistance:

The Hudson River Estuary Program provides assistance to communities and individuals in climate resilience. Contact our Climate Program at (845) 256-3153 or email us.