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Pharaoh Lake Wilderness

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Pharaoh Lake Wilderness locator map

The 46,283-acre Pharaoh Lake Wilderness is part of the Adirondack Forest Preserve. The wilderness contains an abundance of lakes and ponds, especially in the northern portion. The namesake Pharaoh Lake, at 441 acres, is one of the largest lakes in the Adirondacks completely surrounded by Forest Preserve lands. Other large waters in the wilderness include 167-acre Crane Pond, 77-acre Gooseneck Pond, 66-acre Whortleberry Pond, 54-acre Berrymill Pond, 32-acre Crab Pond, 15-acre Oxshoe Pond and 13-acre Bear Pond. The 2,551-foot Pharaoh Mountain, the highest mountain in the wilderness, is found on the northwest shore of Pharaoh Lake. The remainder of area is mainly comprised of smaller mountains and hills.

Backcountry Information for the East Central Adirondacks provides general information regarding backcountry and seasonal conditions; specific notices regarding closures and conditions of trails, roads, bridges and other infrastructure; and links to weather, state land use regulations, low impact recreation and more.

Featured Activities

Hiking

hiking

General information on hiking includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

There are nearly 70 miles of foot trails in the wilderness and hiking is one of the main uses of the Pharaoh Lake region. The summit of Pharaoh Mountain and the shores of Pharaoh Lake and numerous other waters are the most popular destinations.

Sucker Brook Trail extends 7.5 miles from the Adirondack Trailhead to the intersection of trails at the outlet of Pharaoh Lake. The trail ascends 510 feet in the first four miles from the trailhead. It then descends 375 feet in 0.5 mile before climbing 300 feet in 0.9 mile. The trail descends 150 feet, climbs 140 feet, and then descends 160 feet to the outlet in the last 1.5 miles.

Pharaoh Lake Trail extends 3.3 miles from the Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead to the intersection of trails at the outlet of Pharaoh Lake. The trail ascends 235 feet from Mill Brook for 1.1 miles but gently rises and falls at either end.

Crab Pond Trail leaves the Pharaoh Lake Trail 1.2 miles from the Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead and extends 1.4 miles along the southern bank of Mill Brook to the western shore of Crab Pond (this is one of two Crab Ponds in the wilderness). The trail is fairly flat ascending approximately 100 feet in the last 0.3 mile to reach the pond.

Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail extends 6.0 miles around the shoreline of Pharaoh Lake. The trail gently ascends and descends with changes in elevations less than 100 feet. Numerous other trails connect to this trail.

Watch Rock (#6) Lean-to Spur Trail leaves the Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail approximately 0.9 mile from the Pharaoh Lake Outlet trail intersection and extends 0.2 mile to the western shore of the lake and the Watch Rock Lean-to.

Pharaoh Mountain Trail (2,556 feet) extends 3.8 miles between the Pharaoh Lake Trail and Crane Pond Trail. The trails ascends 1,355 feet in 1.2 miles to the summit and then descends 1,405 feet in 2.6 miles to Crane Pond.

Glidden Marsh Trail extends 2.6 miles between Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail and the Pharaoh Mountain Trail. The trail ascends 300 feet from Pharaoh Lake for the first 0.4 mile and then descends 270 feet for the remaining 2.2 miles.

Springhill Ponds Trail extends 6.0 miles from the New Hague Road Trailhead to the Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail. The trail ascends 710 feet in the first 1.1 miles from the trailhead and descends 885 feet in the last 3.5 miles. In between there is a series ascents and descents of less than 100 feet.

Springhill Ponds Spur Trail leaves the Springhill Ponds Trail approximately 3.0 miles from the trailhead and extends 0.3 mile to the southern shore of the larger of the Springhill Ponds.

Berrymill Pond Trail extends 5.5 miles between the New Hague Road Trailhead and Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead South. The trail ascends 740 feet in the first 1.5 miles from the New Hague Road Trailhead and then descends 235 feet in next 1.7 miles to shore of Berrymill Pond. Starting at the Putman Pond Campground the trail ascends 235 feet in 2.0 miles to the pond. A day use fee is required to park a vehicle at the Putnam Pond Campground when the campground is open.

Lost Pond Trail extends 1.4 miles and ascends 235 feet from the Lost Pond Trailhead to the pond and then loops 1.2 miles around the shores of the pond.

Grizzle Ocean Trail extends 5.6 miles from the Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead South to the Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail. The trail ascends 110 feet in the first .75 mile and then descends 135 feet in 0.25 mile. The trail rises and falls gently for 0.4 mile before ascending 190 feet in 1.5 miles to the high point of the trail between Grizzle Ocean Mountain and Thunderbolt Mountain. The trail descends 330 feet from the high point for 1.4 miles and then gently rises and falls until it reaches the shores of Pharaoh Lake. A day use fee is required to park a vehicle at the Putnam Pond Campground when the campground is open.

Grizzle Ocean Loop Trail leaves the Grizzle Ocean Trail approximately 1.8 miles from the Putnam Pond Trailhead and loops 1.1 miles around Grizzle Ocean before returning to the Grizzle Ocean Trail 0.3 mile west.

Clear Pond Trail extends 3.8 miles from the Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead North looping around Putnam Pond to the Grizzle Ocean Trail at a location approximately 1.2 miles from the Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead South. The trail drops 100 feet in 0.1 mile to the shore of North Pond, after passing along the northern shore of the pond it ascends 170 feet in 0.1 mile. Between Rock Pond and Clear Pond the trail ascends 265 feet and descends 135 feet in a 0.5 mile. The trail descends 120 feet in the 1.1 miles from Clear Pond to the Grizzle Ocean Trail. Clear Pond and the Clear Pond Trail can also be accessed from the western shore of Putnam Pond via a 0.6-mile spur trail. A day use fee is required to park a vehicle at the Putnam Pond Campground when the campground is open.

Treadway Mountain Trail leaves the Clear Pond Trail 0.4 mile north of Grizzle Ocean Trail and ascends 2.1 miles and 925 feet to the mountain's 2,208-foot summit. A 0.3-mile spur trail from the western shore of Putnam Pond can be used to access this trail.

Bear Pond Trail leaves the Clear Pond Trail approximately 0.4 miles from the Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead North and extends 2.8 miles to Rock Pond and the Rock Pond Trail. Heart Pond is located at the start of the trail and the trail passes Bear Pond 1.2 miles from the trailhead. The trail ascends 350 feet and descends 370 feet in the 1.1 mile prior to reaching Rock Pond.

Rock Pond Connector Trail leaves the Clear Pond Trail approximately 1.7 miles from the Clear Pond Trailhead and extends 0.3 mile to the Rock Pond Trail near the intersection with the Bear Pond Trail.

Rock Pond Trail is a 1.9-mile loop trail on the shores of Rock Pond. The trail can be reached using the Clear Pond Trail, the Bear Pond Trail, the Rock Pond Connector Trail and the Rock Pond - Lily Pad Pond Trail. The trail leaves the Clear Pond Trail 1.9 miles from the Clear Pond Trailhead on the shores of Little Rock Pond. The Rock Pond Connector Trail and the Bear Pond Trail join the Rock Pond Trail approximately 0.5 mile northeast of the Clear Pond Trail intersection.

Lilypad Pond/Rock Pond Trail extends 1.3 miles between Rock Pond Trail, along the western shore of that pond, and Short Swing Trail, near Lilypad Pond. The trail contains a few ascents and descents ranging between 50 feet in 0.1 mile and 145 feet in 0.3 mile.

Otter Pond Trail extends 0.4 mile from the trailhead on the southeastern shore of Eagle Lake. The trailhead is only accessible by water which can be accessed from a boat launch on the southwestern end of Eagle Lake.

Short Swing Trail extends 5.0 miles from Short Swing Trailhead to the Glidden Marsh Trail near Glidden Marsh. The trail moderately rises and falls in the first 1.0 mile before ascending 355 feet in the next 1.5 miles. The trail then descends 210 feet in 0.5 mile before ascending 340 feet in 0.7 mile to the highest point on the trail. The remainder of the trail descends 245 feet with a few small ascents. The trail passes Tubmill Marsh, Lilypad Pond, Crab Pond and Oxshoe Pond and the lean-tos on their shores.

Long Swing Trail extends 2.6 miles from Long Swing/Blue Hill Trailhead to the Crane Pond Trail. After a moderately steep ascent near the beginning of the trail there is 280-foot ascent in .75 mile starting approximately 1.2 miles from the trailhead. The trail then descends 220 feet in the next 0.6 mile. The remainder of the trail consists of gentle to moderate ascents and descents.

Crane Pond Trail extends 1.7 miles from the Crane Pond Trailhead at the edge of the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness to the western shore of Crane Pond. The trail ascends 160 feet in the first 1.2 miles to the highest point on the trail and then descends 60 feet to the end of the trail. The last 0.7 mile of the trail parallels the north shore of Alder Pond. NOTE: This trail is neither designated nor maintained for motor vehicle use. DEC discourages the use of the trail by motor vehicles, however, hikers should be alert for motor vehicles on the trail.

Goose Pond Trail leaves the Crane Pond Trail approximately 0.9 mile from its trailhead and extends 0.9 mile to the north shore of Goose Pond, ascending 140 feet.

Gull Pond Trail extends 0.5 mile from Gull Pond Trailhead to the western shore of the pond.

Spectacle Pond Trail extends 1.7 miles and climbs 295 feet from Spectacle Pond Trailhead to the southern shore of the pond.

Camping

Primitive Camping

lean to General information on backcountry camping includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

There are 38 designated primitive tent sites and 14 lean-tos in the wilderness. All are available on a first come - first served basis and cannot be reserved. Designated tent sites are marked with a yellow "Camp Here" disc. Designated tent sites are for tents only. Tents or small campers can use designated campsites. There are no hook-ups for water or electricity at campsites.

Lean-tos, especially those on Pharaoh Lake are very popular in the summer and fall. Finding an unoccupied lean-to may be difficult. Campers should be prepared to hike farther than planned to reach an unoccupied lean-to and be prepared to use a designated tent site.

Three designated tent sites are located along Pharaoh Lake Trail between Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead and Pharaoh Lake. Two are located at the Mill Brook crossing near the intersection of the Crab Pond Trail and one is located at the Pharaoh Lake Brook crossing.

A designated tent site is located on the shore of Crab Pond which can be accessed from the Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead via Pharaoh Lake Trail and Crab Pond Trail.

14 designated tent sites are located on the shore of Pharaoh Lake along Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail which can be accessed from:

  • Sucker Brook Trailhead via Sucker Brook Trail;
  • Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead via Pharaoh Lake Trail;
  • New Hague Road Trailhead via Spring Hills Pond Trail;
  • Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead South via Grizzle Ocean Trail;
  • Short Swing Trailhead via the Short Swing Trail and the Glidden Marsh Trail;
  • Long Swing/Blue Hill Trailhead via Long Swing Trail, Crane Pond Trail and Glidden Marsh Trail; and
  • Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail.

Pharaoh Mountain Tent Site can be accessed from:

  • Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead via Pharaoh Lake Trail, Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail and the Pharaoh Mountain Trail;
  • Long Swing/Blue Hill Trailhead via Long Swing Trail and Pharaoh Mountain Trail;
  • Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail and Pharaoh Mountain Trail.

Two designated tent sites are located on the shore of Springhill Ponds which can be accessed from New Hague Road Trailhead via Springhill Ponds Trail and Springhill Ponds Spur Trail.

Three designated tent sites are located on the shore of Lost Pond which can be accessed from Lost Pond Trailhead via Lost Pond Trail.

Nine designated tent sites are located on the shore of Crane Pond and can only be accessed by water. Crane Pond can be accessed from Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail.

Three designated tent sites are located on the shore of Goose Pond which can be accessed from Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail and Goose Pond Trail.

A designated tent site is located on the shore of Gull Pond which can be accessed from the Gull Pond Trailhead via the Gull Pond Trail.

A designated tent site is located on the shore of Spectacle Pond which can be accessed from the Spectacle Pond Trailhead via the Spectacle Pond Trail.

Berrymill Pond Lean-to can be accessed from New Hague Road Trailhead via Berrymill Pond Trail.

Grizzle Ocean Lean-to can be access from Putnam Pond Trailhead via Grizzle Ocean Trail and Grizzle Ocean Loop Trail.

Clear Pond Lean-to can be accessed from Clear Pond Trailhead via Clear Pond Trail and Putnam Pond Trailhead via Grizzle Ocean Trail and Clear Pond Trail.

Little Rock Pond Lean-to can be accessed from Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead North via Clear Pond Trail.

Rock Pond Lean-to can be accessed from Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead North via Clear Pond Trail and Rock Pond Trail.

Tubmill Marsh Lean-to, Lilypad Pond Lean-to, and Oxshoe Pond Lean-to are located along Short Swing Trail and can be accessed from:

  • Short Swing Trailhead via Short Swing Trail;
  • Long Swing/Blue Hill Trailhead via Long Swing Trail, Crane Pond Trail, Pharaoh Mountain Trail, Glidden Marsh Trail, and Short Swing Trail; and
  • Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail, Pharaoh Mountain Trail, Glidden Marsh Trail, and Short Swing Trail.

Campers who prefer more amenities may camp at the nearby Putnam Pond Campground, Paradox Lake Campground, Rogers Rock Campground, Scaroon Manor Campground, or Eagle Point Campground.

Paddling

paddling

General information on paddling includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

While all of the waters in the wilderness are open to paddlers, the remoteness of the lakes and ponds make it hard to access many of them. Motorboats are not allowed on any waters within the wilderness.

Crane Pond is the most popular paddling location within the wilderness because it is the most easily accessed and has shoreline tent sites. The pond can be accessed from Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail.

Goose Pond sets between Goose Pond Hill and Meadow Hill, and can be accessed from Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail and Goose Pond Trail.

Berrymill Pond has a lean-to on its northeastern shoreline and can be accessed from New Hague Road Trailhead or Putnam Pond Campground Trailhead South via Berrymill Pond Trail.

Lost Pond can be accessed from Lost Pond Trailhead via Lost Pond Trail.

Putnam Pond borders the wilderness on the east and can be accessed from the Putnam Pond Boat Launch. A day use fee is charged to use the boat launch when the campground is open. Motorboats can be used on this pond.

Eagle Lake borders the wilderness on the north and can be accessed from the Eagle Bay Hand Launch. Motorboats can be used on this lake.

Fishing

fishing

General information on fishing includes fishing tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations

All waters within the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness are open to fishing. Anglers may use the same trailheads and trails as hikers, the same hand launches as paddlers and the same campsites as campers to access and fish these waters.

Pharaoh Lake Wilderness has an abundance of lakes, ponds and streams that contain wild and stocked fish. The wilderness is known for its abundance of small brook trout ponds, many of which are located alongside the excellent trail system. Some are identified below but a list of many more of these ponds can be found in the Essex County Brook Trout Waters table.

NOTE: Baitfish are prohibited in all lakes, ponds, and streams in the wilderness.

421-acre Pharaoh Lake, the wilderness's namesake and largest waterbody, contains brook trout, lake trout, brown bullhead, and sunfish. It can be accessed from the Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead via Pharaoh Lake Trail, Pharaoh Lake Lean-to Spur Trail, Pharaoh Lake East Shore Trail and Glidden Marsh Trail, and other trailheads and trails described in the camping section.

158-acre Crane Pond is popular with anglers as a fishing water and as a camping and "trailhead" area for access to interior fishing waters. It contains lake trout, rainbow trout, smallmouth bass, yellow perch, brown bullhead, and sunfish. The pond can be accessed from Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail, Long Swing Trail and a short spur trail to the western end of the pond.

67-acre Gooseneck Pond contains smallmouth bass, lake trout, rainbow trout and yellow perch. The pond can be accessed from State Route 74 via a 0.6-mile hike on a gated road alongside the pond's outlet.

50-acre Whortleberry Pond contains brook trout and sunfish. The pond can be accessed from the Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead via Pharaoh Lake Trail, Pharaoh Lake East Shore Trail, and Whortleberry Pond Trail; and New Hague Road Trailhead via the Spring Hill Pond Trail, Pharaoh Lake East Shore Trail, and Whortleberry Pond Trail

40-acre Berrymill Pond contains northern pike, brown bullhead, and yellow perch. The pond can be accessed from the New Hague Road Trailhead or the Putnam Pond Trailhead using the Berrymill Pond Trail.

30-acre Crab Pond contains brook trout, brown trout and brown bullhead. The pond can be accessed from Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail, Long Swing Trail and Short Swing Trail.

13-acre Oxshoe Pond contain brook trout and brown bullhead. The pond can be accessed from Crane Pond Trailhead via Crane Pond Trail, Long Swing Trail and Short Swing Trail.

Adirondack/Lake Champlain Fishing provides information on fishing in the Adirondacks and links to top fishing waters, stocking lists, public fishing access and waters open to ice fishing listed by county.

Help Protect Native Adirondack Fish; populations of brook trout, round whitefish and other native Adirondack fish species have severely declined due to introduced fish.

Hunting & Trapping

hunting
trapping

General Information on hunting and general information on trapping includes how-to and safety tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations

All lands within the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness are open to hunting and trapping. Hunters and trappers may use the parking areas, roads, seasonal access roads, trailheads, and trails used by hikers, and hand launches used by paddlers to access the lands and waters in this area. Hunters can park on the shoulders of seasonal access roads provided vehicles are not out of the travel lane.

Small game found in the wilderness include snowshoe hare and game birds such as woodcock, ruffed grouse, and wild turkey. Waterfowl can be found on the many waters.

Big game hunting for white-tailed deer and black bear is popular.

Trappers will find beaver, otter, fisher, coyote, bobcat, raccoon, red fox, gray fox, marten, and muskrat.

Cross-country Skiing & Snowshoeing

cross country skiing
snow shoeing

General information on cross-country skiing and snowshoeing includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

Cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are permitted on all hiking trails.

Pharaoh Lake Trail extends 3.3 miles from the Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead to the intersection of trails at the outlet of Pharaoh Lake. The trail ascends 235 feet from Mill Brook for 1.1 miles but gently rises and falls at either end.

Pharaoh Lake Loop Trail extends 6.0 miles around the shoreline of Pharaoh Lake. The trail gently ascends and descends with changes in elevations less than 100 feet. Numerous other trails connect to the trail.

Wildlife

General information on animals includes links to information about birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians and insects that inhabit or migrate through the state.

The Adirondacks contain large tracts of wildlife habitat with some boreal, bog, alpine and other unique habitats. Many birds (Common Loon, Peregrine Falcon) and mammals (Moose, Black Bear) are unique to the Adirondacks or are mainly found here. More than 50 species of mammals and hundreds of species of birds inhabit or pass through the Adirondacks at one time of the year or another.

Horseback Riding

horseback riding

General information on horseback riding includes safety tips and rules & regulations. Proof of current negative Coggins certificate is required for all horses and out-of-state horse owners are required to produce a 30-day health certificate.

There are two designated horse trails:

Sucker Brook Trail extends 7.5 miles from the Adirondack Trailhead to the intersection of trails at the outlet of Pharaoh Lake. The trail ascends 510 feet in the first four miles from the trailhead. It then descends 375 feet in 0.5 mile before climbing 300 feet in 0.9 mile. The trail descends 150 feet, climbs 140 feet, and then descends 160 feet to the outlet in the last 1.5 miles.

Pharaoh Lake Trail extends 3.3 miles from the Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead to the intersection of trails at the outlet of Pharaoh Lake. The trail ascends 235 feet from Mill Brook for 1.1 miles but gently rises and falls at either end.

The two trails connect at the outlet of Pharaoh Lake and can be combined for a 10.8 mile one way ride. Horses must ford Pharaoh Lake Brook just south of the outlet bridge to reach the other trail.

Directions

All coordinates provided are in decimal degrees using the NAD83/WGS84 datum.

Parking Areas and Trailheads

  • Adirondack Trailhead Parking Area is located at the end of Blair Road off of Johnson Road. (43.7714°N, 73.7426°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Pharaoh Lake Road Trailhead Parking Area is located at the end of Pharaoh Road off Beaver Pond Road. (43.7602°N, 73.6892°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Springhill Ponds Trailhead Parking Area is located on New Hague Road. (43.7809°N, 73.5530°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Lost Pond Trailhead Parking Area is located along Putnam Pond Campground Road. (43.8407°N, 73.5586°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Putnam Pond Trailhead is located within the Putnam Pond Campground (43.8374°N, 73.5717°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Clear Pond Trailhead is located within the Putnam Pond Campground (43.8438°N, 73.5702°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Short Swing Trailhead Parking Area is located along State Route 74 (43.8752°N, 73.6174°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Long Swing/Blue Hill Trailhead Parking Area is located along State Route 74 (43.8792°N, 73.6806°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Crane Pond Road Trailhead Parking Area is located at the end of Crane Pond Road off of Alder Meadow Road. (43.8592°N, 73.6890°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Gull Pond Trailhead is located along Adirondack Road. (43.834385°N, 73.716999°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Spectacle Pond Trailhead is located along Adirondack Road (43.8223°N, 73.7267°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Boat Launches and Hand Launches

  • Putnam Pond Boat Launch is located in the Putnam Pond Campground. (43.8404°N, 73.5669°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Eagle Lake Hand Launch is located along State Route 74. (43.8742°N, 73.6042°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Rules, Regulations and Outdoor Safety

Practice Leave No Trace principles (Leaves DEC website) when recreating in the Adirondacks to enjoy the outdoors responsibly, minimize impact on the natural resources and avoid conflicts other backcountry users.

All users of Pharaoh Lake Wilderness must follow all State Land Use Regulations and should follow all Outdoor Safety Practices for the safety of the user and protection of the resource.

How We Manage Pharaoh Lake Wilderness

DEC manages these lands in accordance with the management activities described in the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness Unit Management Plan. In addition to management objectives, the UMP contains detailed information on natural features, recreational infrastructure, geology, natural & human history, habitats, wildlife, fisheries and much more.

Nearby State Lands, Facilities, Amenities & Other Information

State Lands & Facilities

Gas, food and other supplies may be found in the nearby communities of Schroon Lake and Ticonderoga.

Dining and lodging opportunities can be found in the nearby communities of Hague, Schroon Lake, Pottersville, and Ticonderoga.

Adirondack Regional Tourism Council (leaves DEC website) and Schroon Lake Area Chamber of Commerce (leaves DEC website) can provide information about other recreation, attractions and amenities in this area.

Numerous guide books and maps are available with information on the lands, waters, trails and other recreational facilities in this area. These can be purchased at most outdoor equipment retailers, bookstores, and on-line booksellers.

Additional information, outdoor equipment, trip suggestions and guided or self-guided tours may be obtained from outdoor guide and outfitting businesses. Check area chambers of commerce, telephone directories or search the internet for listings.

Consider hiring an outdoor guide if you have little experience or woodland skills. See the NYS Outdoor Guides Association (Leaves DEC Website) for information on outdoor guides.