Department of Environmental Conservation

D E C banner

Boreas Ponds Tract

Horseback ridingHiking CampingPaddling BikingFishingHuntingTrappingcross county skiingsnow shoeing Directionsicon key

Boreas Pond Tract Map

The 20,758-acre Boreas Ponds Tract was purchased in the spring of 2016 and is currently unclassified lands in the Adirondack Forest Preserve. A large portion of the Boreas Ponds Tract is a lowland area between the North River Mountain Range to the west and the Boreas Mountain Range to the east. The summits of the Boreas Mountain Range are on the tract. Spectacular views of these mountain ranges and mountains in the High Peaks Wilderness - such as Marcy, Haystack, Gothics, and Saddleback - can be seen from a number of locations.

Boreas Ponds, the namesake of the tract, form a 320-acre body of water, now one of the largest in the park completely surrounded by Forest Preserve. Other waters on the tract include LaBier Flow, Boreas River, LeClaire Brook, Casey Brook, Slide Brook and White Lily Brook, which provide habitat for cold water fish, including brook trout.

Leased camps on the Tract may remain until October 2018. The public is prohibited from entering camps and trespassing on the surrounding one-acre envelopes. Lessees are allowed motor vehicle access to their camps.

Backcountry Information for the High Peaks Region provides general information regarding backcountry and seasonal conditions; specific notices regarding closures and conditions of trails, roads, bridges and other infrastructure; and links to weather, state land use regulations, low impact recreation and more.

Note: These lands have not yet been classified by the Adirondack Park Agency (leaves DEC website). The access, parking areas, and recreational activities described here do not have any bearing on the future classification of the lands nor does it suggest what access and uses will be allowed in the future.

Featured Activities

Hiking

Hiking

General information on hiking includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

No trails have been designated or marked at this time, however hiking is permitted on all roadways within the tract.

Hikers should be aware that lease holders have the right to drive motor vehicles and ATVs on Gulf Brook Road, Trout Pond Road, White Lily Pond Road, and Ragged Mountain Road.

Camping

Camping

General information on backcountry camping includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

No tent sites have been designated, but all of the lands are open to backcountry camping provided campsites are more than 150 feet from any roadway or body of water.

Campers who desire more amenities may camp at the nearby Lake Harris Campground or Sharp Bridge Campground and take day trips into the Boreas Ponds.

Paddling

Paddling

General information on paddling includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

LaBier Flow and Boreas Ponds are attractive waters for paddling and can be accessed from the parking areas along Gulf Brook Road. Paddlers will need to carry their canoe or kayak at least 2.5 miles from the parking area to LaBier Flow. There is a 0.5-mile carry between LaBier Flow and the Boreas Ponds.

Paddlers should be aware that lease holders have the right to drive motor vehicles and ATVs on Gulf Brook Road.

Horseback Riding

Horseback riding

General information on horseback riding includes safety tips and rules & regulations

Approximately 25 miles of seven roadways are open to horse and horse drawn wagons, including:

  • 3.0 miles of the Sand Pond Road;
  • 2.9 miles of the Ragged Mountain Road;
  • 6.7 miles of Gulf Brook Road and the roadway to the Boreas Ponds Dam;
  • 3.3 miles of the Trout Pond Road off the Gulf Brook Road;
  • 3.0 miles of the White Lily Pond Road off the Gulf Brook Road;
  • 2.5 miles of the Casey Brook Road beyond the Boreas Ponds Dam; and
  • 1.5 miles of the LeClaire Brook Road off the Casey Brook Road.

Proof of current negative Coggins certificate is required for all horses and out-of-state horse owners are required to produce a 30-day health certificate. Horseback riders and horse drawn wagon riders should be aware that lease holders have the right to drive motor vehicles and ATVs on Gulf Brook Road, Trout Pond Road, White Lily Pond Road, and Ragged Mountain Road.

Biking

Biking

General information on biking includes how-to and safety tips with links to rules & regulations

6.7 miles of roadway is open to bicycling from Blue Ridge Road to the Boreas Ponds Dam, mostly on the Gulf Brook Road. Bikers can pedal shorter distances to the Boreas Ponds Dam by parking in one of the parking areas along the Gulf Brook Road.

Bikes are prohibited east of the Boreas Ponds Dam.

Bikers should be aware that lease holders have the right to drive motor vehicles and ATVs on Gulf Brook Road.

Fishing

Fishing

General information on fishing includes fishing tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations

All waters within the Boreas Ponds Tract are open to fishing. Anglers may use the parking areas, roadways, seasonal access roads, and hand launches used by paddlers to access the lands and waters in this area.

Boreas Ponds contain brook trout, brown bullhead and sunfish and can be accessed from any of the Gulf Brook Trailheads via Gulf Brook Road, LaBier Flow and the roadway to the Boreas Ponds Dam.

LaBier Flow contains brook trout, brown bullhead and sunfish and can be accessed from any of the Gulf Brook Trailheads via Gulf Brook Road.

The Branch contains brook trout and can be accessed from Elk Lake Road Fishing Access Parking Area and the Elk Lake Road Upper Parking Area currently via a bushwhack as no trails have been established.

NOTE: Anglers may see landlocked Atlantic salmon below legal size while fishing The Branch. The salmon are stocked as fry and The Branch serves as nursery habitat. The salmon grow and develop in this small stream before migrating downstream to Schroon Lake.

Adirondack/Lake Champlain Fishing provides information on fishing in the Adirondacks and links to top fishing waters, stocking lists, public fishing access and waters open to ice fishing listed by county.

Help Protect Native Adirondack Fish; populations of brook trout, round whitefish and other native Adirondack fish species have severely declined due to introduced fish.

Hunting & Trapping

Hunting
Trapping

General Information on hunting and general information on trapping includes how-to and safety tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations.

All lands within the Boreas Ponds Tract are open to hunting and trapping. Hunters and trappers may use the parking areas, roadways, seasonal access roads, and hand launches used by paddlers to access the lands and waters in this area.

Big game present include white-tailed deer and black bear. Small game includes varying (snowshoe) hare, ruffed grouse and woodcock.

Hunters and trappers should be aware that lease holders have the right to drive motor vehicles, ATVs and snowmobiles on Gulf Brook Road, Trout Pond Road, White Lily Pond Road, and Ragged Mountain Road.

Cross-country Skiing & Snowshoeing

cross county skiing
snow shoeing

General information on cross-country skiing and snowshoeing includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

No trails have been designated or marked at this time, however cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are permitted on all roadways and lands within the tract.

Cross-country skiers and snowshoers should be aware that lease holders have the right to drive snowmobiles on Gulf Brook Road, Trout Pond Road, White Lily Pond Road, and Ragged Mountain Road.

When traveling on designated snowmobile trails, skiers and snowshoers should be alert for snowmobiles. Move to the side of the trail to allow snowmobiles to pass.

Wildlife

General information on animals includes links to information about birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians and insects that inhabit or migrate through the state.

The Adirondacks contain large tracts of wildlife habitat with some boreal, bog, alpine and other unique habitats. Many birds (Common Loon, Peregrine Falcon) and mammals (Moose, Black Bear) are unique to the Adirondacks or are mainly found here. Over 50 species of mammals and hundreds of species of birds inhabit or pass through the Adirondacks at one time of the year or another. Moose have been seen and photographed on the Boreas Tract.

Directions

All coordinates provided are in decimal degrees using NAD83/WGS84 datum.

Parking and Directions Areas

  • Sand Pond Road Parking Area (P1) is located along the Blue Ridge Road. (43.9536°N, 73.8910°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Gulf Brook Road Entrance Parking Area (P2) is located along the Blue Ridge Road. (43.9557°N, 73.8678°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Gulf Brook Road Lower Parking Area (P6) is located on the seasonal access Gulf Brook Road. (43.9760°N, 73.8800°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Gulf Brook Road Middle Parking Area (P7) is located on the seasonal access Gulf Brook Road. (43.9789°N, 73.8898°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Gulf Brook Road Upper Parking Area (P8) is located on the seasonal access Gulf Brook Road. (43.9809°N, 73.9000°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Ragged Mountain Road Parking Area (P3) is located along the Blue Ridge Road. (43.9553°N, 73.8362°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Elk Lake Road Fishing Access Parking Area (P4) is located on the Elk Lake Road. (43.9645°N, 73.8200°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Elk Lake Road Upper Parking Area (P5) is located on the Elk Lake Road. (43.9899°N, 73.8299°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Rules, Regulations and Outdoor Safety

Practice Leave No Trace principles (Leaves DEC website) when recreating in the Adirondacks to enjoy the outdoors responsibly, minimize impact on the natural resources and avoid conflicts other backcountry users.

All users of Boreas Ponds Tract must follow all State Land Use Regulations and should follow all Outdoor Safety Practices for the safety of the user and protection of the resource.

The public is prohibited from entering any leased camps or trespassing on the surrounding one-acre envelope.

How We Manage Boreas Ponds Tract

Currently DEC manages these lands in accordance with the Boreas Ponds Tract Interim Access Plan as the lands have not been classified by the Adirondack Park Agency at this time. Once the lands have been classified DEC will develop a Unit Management Plan which will identify the management objectives, and provide detailed information on natural features, recreational infrastructure, geology, natural & human history, habitats, wildlife, fisheries and much more.

Nearby State Lands, Facilities, Amenities & Other Information

Gas and food can be obtained in North Hudson. Dining is available in Newcomb and lodging is available in Newcomb and North Hudson.

Adirondack Regional Tourism Council (leaves DEC website) and Essex County/Lake Placid Tourism (leaves DEC website) can provide information about other recreation, attractions and amenities in this area.

Numerous guide books and maps are available with information on the lands, waters, trails and other recreational facilities in this area. These can be purchased at most outdoor equipment retailers, bookstores, and on-line booksellers.

Additional information, outdoor equipment, trip suggestions and guided or self-guided tours may be obtained from outdoor guide and outfitting businesses. Check area chambers of commerce, telephone directories or search the internet for listings.

Consider hiring an outdoor guide if you have little experience or woodland skills. See the NYS Outdoor Guides Association (Leaves DEC Website) for information on outdoor guides.