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Taylor Pond Complex

Taylor Pond Wild Forest, Terry Mountain State Forest, Burnt Hill State Forest, Franklin Falls Easement Tract, Shell Rock Easement Tract, and Black Brook Easement Tract

hikingback country campingfishingboating paddlingbiking horse back riding rock climbing hunting trapping cross country skiing snow shoeing snowmobiling firetowerparking and directionslean toboat launch hand launch picnic area accessible features icon key

Taylor Pond Complex locator map
  • Open for recreation: Year-round
  • Fee: Free
  • Contact Information:
    • DEC Region 5 Ray Brook Office: 518-897-1200 (M-F, 8:30 to 4:45); Info.R5@dec.ny.gov
    • Backcountry Emergencies: 518-891-0235 or 911 (24/7)
    • Enforcement Matters: 1-518-408-5850 (24/7)
  • Location: Towns of Ausable, Black Brook, Peru and Saranac, Clinton County; Towns of Chesterfield, Elizabethtown, Essex, Jay, Lewis, and St. Armand, Essex County; and Town of Franklin, Franklin County.
  • WMU: 5C, 5F & 5G
  • Map: A map for the Taylor Pond Complex is being developed || Google Earth || State Lands Interactive Mapper

The 53,280-acre Taylor Pond Complex consists of numerous tracts of various types of state land and easement land spread over a 567 square mile area. The Complex is comprised of

  • 45,637 acres of Adirondack Forest Preserve lands in 26 separate parcels classified as Wild Forest;
  • 6,314 acres of State Forest lands in the 2,752-acre Terry Mountain State Forest and the1,575-acre Burnt Hill State Forest; and
  • 23,067 acres of Conservation Easement lands with public recreational rights in the 15,713-acre Black Brook Easement Tract, 3,748-acre Franklin Falls Easement Tract, and the 794-acre Shell Rock Easement Tract.

The largest parcels of public lands and easement land with public access are concentrated along and around the Saranac River, Franklin Falls Pond, Union Falls Pond, Silver Lake and its namesake Taylor Pond. The many waters, forested lands, and low-lying hills and mountains provide a wide variety of outdoor recreational opportunities.

Timber harvest is allowed on State Forest and Conservation Easement Lands, but not on Forest Preserve Lands.

Backcountry Information for the Northeastern Adirondacks provides general information regarding backcountry and seasonal conditions; specific notices regarding closures and conditions of trails, roads, bridges and other infrastructure; and links to weather, state land use regulations, low impact recreation and more.

Featured Activities

Hiking

hiking

General information on hiking includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain (2,162 feet) - The summit and the fire tower residing there provide 360 degree views of the surrounding area and may be accessed by either of two trails:

  • The 1.9-mile Observer's Trail which ascends 1,280 feet from the trailhead to the summit along route of an old access road used by fire observers. The trail travels through the forest for much of its length and several beaver ponds may be observed along the route.
  • The 1.3-mile Ranger Trail ascends 1,280 feet from the trailhead in the Poke-O-Moonshine Day Use Area to the summit. Significant work has been completed to upgrade the existing trail. Stone steps were installed and portions of the trail are rerouted. The rerouted lower half of the trail passes through some interesting rock features. A reroute of the upper half of the trail is planned in the future.

Catamount Mountain (3,168 feet) - The summit can be reached via a 1.8-mile trail that ascends 1,540 feet from the trailhead. The hike includes one steep and exposed scramble. The view from summit includes Taylor Pond, Silver Lake, Union Falls Pond, the Wilmington Range, the Stephenson Range and Whiteface Mountain. Large patches of wild blueberries are found on and around the summit.

Silver Lake Mountain (2,347 feet) - The summit can be reached via a 0.9-mile trail that ascends 900 feet from the trailhead. The summit offers views of Silver Lake, Taylor Pond, and Whiteface Mountain.

Taylor Pond Trail North extends 3.6 miles from the Taylor Pond Trailhead to a lean-to on the north side of Taylor Pond. The trail forks 0.4 mile from the trailhead, the Taylor Pond North Trail is to the right. The trail passes through the DEC Taylor Pond Campground; hikers may pass through for no fee. The trail gently ascends and descends for the first 1.3 miles and then climbs 165 feet in 0.3 mile. After the ascent it immediately descends 190 feet in the next 0.5 mile and then almost immediately ascends 230 feet the next mile.

Taylor Pond Trail South extends 2.6 miles from the Taylor Pond Trailhead to a lean-to on the southern shore of the pond. The trail forks 0.4 mile from the trailhead, the Taylor Pond South Trail is to the left. The trail ascends 80 feet in 0.25 mile shortly after the fork but otherwise gently rises and falls.

Hikers can also access the Taylor Pond Trails from the Taylor Pond Campground Day Use Parking Area. This reduces the length of the north trail by 0.6 mile and the south trail by 0.2 mile. A day use fee will be charged to hikers parking there when the campground is in operation - the weekend before Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day Weekend.

Saranac River Access Trail extends 0.2 mile from the trailhead to the banks of the Saranac River and a primitive tent site.

Mud Pond (Route 3) Trail extends 1.0 mile from its trailhead to the shores of 109-acre Mud Pond with views of the Alder Brook Mountains and which has a designated tent site.

Silver Lake Bog Trail extends 1.0 mile to a bluff overlooking Silver Lake with a view of Whiteface Mountain on lands owned by and managed by the Nature Conservancy (leaves DEC website). The first half mile is on a boardwalk through a bog with benches for sitting and many opportunities for watching birds and other animals. The trail ascends 170 feet in the last quarter mile to the top of the bluff.

Military Pond Trail extends 5.7 miles along a dirt road from the Guideboard Road South Parking Area on the Black Brook Easement Tract to Military Pond in Terry Mountain State Forest. The trail passes Slush Pond 2.8 miles from the trailhead. There is no signage at the parking area and the trail is not marked.

Fire Tower

fire tower

General information on fire towers includes historic and current uses of fire towers and links to other locations with fire towers.

The 35-foot tall Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain Fire Tower, a steel Aermotor LS40 tower, was constructed in 1917 to replace a wooden fire tower built in 1912. In 1920, the station was the first in the New York State system to be equipped with an experimental Osborne Fire Finder, a type of panoramic map developed by the U. S. Forest Service for use with an alidade.

The fire tower was staffed and used for fire observation until 1988 and now appears on the National Historic Lookout Register along with the New York State and National Registers of Historic Places.

The tower has been open to the public since restoration was completed in 1996. The public may climb the tower and enjoy the view Thursdays through Mondays during the summer and on some weekends in the fall. A summit steward or volunteer is present when the fire tower is open and provides local and natural history interpretation, environmental education, and assistance for the hiking public. The cab of the fire tower includes interpretive panels on the interior walls which display the changes in land use of the surrounding area since the tower was installed.

The Friends of Poke-O-Moonshine (leaves DEC website) have been an important partner in restoring and maintaining the fire tower, maintaining trails to the summit and providing educational and interpretive materials on the trails, the summit and in the fire tower.

Rock & Ice Climbing

rock and ice climbing

General information on rock and ice climbing includes how-to and safety tips with links to rules & regulations

Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain is considered one of the best climbing locations in the northeast with more than 250 climbing routes on numerous cliff faces. The mountain provides various types of climbing opportunities with a range of difficulty. The Main Face is 400 feet high; other cliff faces provide shorter climbing routes.

The cliffs are easily accessed from the parking area at the DEC Poke-O-Moonshine Day Use Area near the base of the mountain. Picnic tables, fire places, barbecue grills and two vault privies are located at the day use area. Overnight camping is prohibited.

NOTE: DEC closes climbing routes on portions of the Main Face from April 1 through mid-summer to protect nesting peregrine falcons and their chicks. Learn more about peregrine falcons and Adirondack rock climbing.

Silver Lake Mountain and Potter Mountain Cliffs on the Black Brook Easement Tract can be accessed from four trailheads.

Silver Lake Mountain Trailhead provides access to the summit of the mountain via the hiking trail. A bushwhack along the ridge line leads the easement tract and provides access to top rope climbing on the Silver Lake Mountain Summit Areas, the Hydrogen Wall, C Chimney Cliff, Never Never Land and the Purple Rain Wall.

The following trailheads are located on the easement. There are no trailhead signs nor signs identifying the easement tract. Also the trails which follow old logging roads are not marked.

  • Mud Pond Trailhead is located along Silver Lake Road approximately 0.2 mile east of the Silver Lake Mountain Trailhead (44.5100 N, 73.8456 W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website). A trail register is located 100 feet from the trailhead. The Mud Pond Cliffs can also be accessed from this trailhead.
  • Turnpike Road Trailhead is considered the main access point to the cliffs and is located along Turnpike Road (44.5035 N, 73.8053 W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website). A trail register is located 100 feet from the trailhead.
  • Goodrich Mills Trailhead is the most eastern trailhead and is located along Goodrich Mills Road (44.5055 N, 73.7840 W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website). A trail register is located 200 feet from the trailhead beyond the closed gate.

All climbers should check guidebooks or other sources of information about climbing these cliffs. Inexperienced climbers should consider hiring a climbing guide or be sure to climb with experienced climbers.

Camping

camping
lean to

General information on backcountry camping includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

There are twelve designated primitive tent sites and four lean-tos in this unit; many can only be accessed, or are more easily accessed, by water. All designated primitive tents sites, campsites and lean-tos are available on a first come - first served basis and cannot be reserved. Designated campsites are marked with a yellow "Camp Here" disc. Designated tent sites are for tents only. Tents or small campers can use designated campsites. There are no hook-ups for water or electricity at campsites.

Five designated campsites are located on the shores of Franklin Falls Pond and the Saranac River above the pond. Four are located on the northwestern shore and can be accessed directly from River Road or from the water. Two of those sites may be used for group camping. The fifth designated primitive tent site is located on a large island.

Five designated tent sites are located on the eastern shore of Union Falls Pond. Two of the sites are located near the Union Falls Boat Launch, one of which can be used for group camping, and can be accessed by foot. The other three designated tent sites are spread out between French's Brook and the outlet to Cranberry Pond and can only be accessed by water from the Union Falls Pond Boat Launch.

Two designated tent sites and three lean-tos located along the shores of Taylor Pond are considered part of the Taylor Pond Campground.

  • When the campground is open - typically the weekend before Memorial Day holiday weekend through Labor Day - the lean-to and tent site can be reserved and an overnight camping fee must be paid.
  • During the remainder of the year the lean-tos and campsites are available free of charge on a first come, first served basis
  • The lean-to on the western shore should be accessed by boat, the lean-to on the southern shore can be accessed by boat or hiking while the lean-to on the northern side of the pond is best accessed by hiking.
  • The tent sites are located on the peninsula on the northeast shore of the pond.

Campers seeking more amenities may camp at the nearby Taylor Pond Campground, Buck Pond Campground, Ausable Point Campground, or the Macomb Reservation State Park (leaves DEC website) and take day trips into the unit.

Picnicking

picnicking

Poke-O-Moonshine Day Use Area contains picnic tables, fire places, barbecue grills and two vault privies. Picnic and enjoy the view; park to hike the trails or climb the cliffs; or combine activities. Overnight camping is prohibited.

Paddling

paddling

General information on paddling includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

Approximately 30 miles of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail (leaves DEC website) passes through the unit on the Saranac River, Union Falls Pond, and Franklin Falls Pond.

Union Falls Pond: This 1,671-acre, 5.0-mile long body of water can be accessed from a hand launch site near the dam at the north end or from a hand launch site along Plank Road just below the Franklin Falls dam. Bald eagles often nest on the east shore near midpoint of the lake. There are five campsites on the shore.

Franklin Falls Pond: This 437-acre, 2.7-mile long body of water can be accessed from a hand launch on its northwestern shore. The hand launch is designated for use by anglers only.

Saranac River: Starting at the Moose Pond Road Bridge upriver from Franklin Falls Pond is an easy flat water paddle for 2.5 miles to a take-out before the half-mile of rapids known as Permanent Rapids leading to Franklin Falls Pond. The rapids are Class II or III depending on the water level. Below the Union Falls dam the river can be paddled at higher water levels and offers Class III challenges.

Taylor Pond: This 856-acre, 3.0-mile long body of water is accessed from a boat launch at the DEC Taylor Pond Campground. A day use fee will be charged for parking there when the campground is in operation - the weekend before Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day Weekend.

Boating

boating

General information on boating includes safety tips with links to rules & regulations and lists of DEC boat launches by county.

Taylor Pond: This 856-acre, three-mile long body of water is accessed from a boat launch at the DEC Taylor Pond Campground. A day use fee will be charged for parking there when the campground is in operation - the weekend before Memorial Day Weekend through Labor Day Weekend.

Union Falls Pond: This 1,671-acre, five-mile long body of water is accessed from a hand launch site near the dam at the north end or from a hand launch site along Plank Road just below the Franklin Falls dam.

Franklin Falls Pond: This 437-acre, 2.7-mile long body of water can be accessed from a hand launch on its northwestern shore. The hand launch is designated for use by anglers only.

Don't Spread Aquatic Invasive Species! Boats and trailers can spread invasive species from waterbody to waterbody unless properly cleaned after use. Regulations prohibit boats from launching from or leaving DEC launch sites without first draining the boat and cleaning the boat, trailer and equipment of visible plant and animal material.

Fishing

fishing

General information on fishing includes fishing tips with links to seasons, rules & regulations

Anglers may use the same trailheads and trails as hikers, the same hand launches as paddlers, the same boat launches as boaters and the same camp sites as campers to access and fish these waters.

Taylor Pond contains land-locked salmon, lake trout, rainbow smelt, brown bullhead, yellow perch and pumpkinseed.

Fern Lake contains walleye, northern pike, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, brown bullhead, black crappie, yellow perch and panfish. Ice fishing is allowed.

Union Falls Pond contains walleye, northern pike, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, brown bullhead, black crappie, fallfish, yellow perch and panfish. Ice fishing is allowed.

Franklin Falls Pond contains walleye, northern pike, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, brown bullhead, yellow perch and panfish. Ice fishing is allowed. The pond can be accessed from a hand launch on the Franklin Falls Road which is designated for use by anglers only.

Mud Pond (Route 3) contains brown trout.

Military Pond in the Terry Mountain State Forest contains brown trout. The pond may be accessed from the Guideboard Road South Parking Area via the Military Pond Trail on the Black Brook Easement Tract.

Black Brook contains brook trout.

Little Ausable River, Spruce Mill Brook and other brooks & streams in the area contain naturally reproducing brook trout.

The Saranac River is stocked with brown trout and rainbow trout.

Pamphlets are available with maps of state lands and public fishing rights that depict the public access for fishing the following waters:

Adirondack/Lake Champlain Fishing provides information on fishing in the Adirondacks and links to top fishing waters, stocking lists, public fishing access and waters open to ice fishing listed by county.

Help Protect Native Adirondack Fish; populations of brook trout, round whitefish and other native Adirondack fish species have severely declined due to introduced fish.

Hunting & Trapping

hunting
trapping

General Information on hunting and general information on trapping includes how-to, safety tips, and links to seasons, rules & regulations

Hunting and trapping are allowed on all of the lands and waters on the Forest Preserve, State Forest and Easement Lands described on this web page. Hunting and trapping are also allowed in the nearby Ausable Marsh Wildlife Management Area and Wickham Marsh Wildlife Management Area.

Big game hunting for white-tailed deer and black bear is popular in this unit. Small game hunting opportunities for ruffed grouse, varying (snowshoe) hare and woodcock are also available. The two wildlife management areas provide great opportunities for waterfowl hunting.

Hunters and trappers can access the lands and waters using the same parking areas and trails as hikers and the same boat launches and hand launches as boaters and paddlers.

Access to trail-less areas, the roadside parking areas often do not have signs marking their location:

  • Burnt Hill State Forest Parking Area provides access to Burnt Hill State Forest and is located on a seasonal access road off of Maggy Road. (44.6293°N, 73.7275°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Guide Board Road South Parking Area provides access to the Black Book Easement Tract and Taylor Pond Wild Forest lands to the west of the parking area. It is located off Guide Board Road in the Black Brook Easement Tract. (44.4764°N, 73.7448°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Casey Road Parking Area provides access to Shell Rock Easement Tract and is located along River Road. (44.5223°N, 73.9052°W)
  • Union Falls Road Parking Area provides access to Shell Rock Easement Tract and is located on the Union Falls Road between the Union Falls Dam and Silver Lake Road. (44.5141°N, 73.8936°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Plank Road Parking Area provide access to the Franklin Falls Easement Tract and is located on the Plank Road east of the Franklin Falls Dam. (44.4349°N, 73.9563°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Franklin Falls Parking Area provides access to the Franklin Falls Easement Tract and is located along River Road. (44.4327°N, 73.9839°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Plank Road East Parking Area provides access to the Franklin Falls Easement Tract and is located on the Plank Road east of the Franklin Falls Dam. (44.4352°N, 73.9332°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Black Mountain Road Parking Area provides access to the Black Mountain Tract and is located on the seasonal access Black Mountain Road off of Green Street. (44.3995°N, 73.6369°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Red Road Parking Area provides access to Terry Mountain State Forest and is located in the eastern portion of the property on Red Road (44.587346°N, -73.63937°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Seventy Road Parking Area provides access to the Fay Mountain Tract of the Taylor Pond Wild Forest and the eastern portion of the Jay Mountain Wilderness. It is located at the end of seasonal access Seventy Road off of the Wells Hill Road. (44.3138°N, 73.6143°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Biking

biking

General information on biking includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations.

The 1.0-mile Mud Pond (Route 3) Trail is a designated bike trail that begins on State Route 3 opposite the North Branch Saranac River Fishing Access parking area. It accesses the 109-acre Mud Pond which has a designated tent site on its shores with views of the Alder Brook Mountains.

Horseback Riding

horse back riding

General information on horseback riding includes safety tips and rules & regulations

There are no trails designate for horseback riding but horses are allowed on seasonal access roads that are open to motor vehicles.

Snowmobiling

snowmobling

General information on snowmobiling includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

Snowmobiling is a popular outdoor recreational activity in this unit. Nearly 50 miles of snowmobile trails are located on the lands and connect with a larger network of trails.

The 10.5-mile Taylor Pond Loop Trail is a designated snowmobile trail and accesses three lean-tos on the shores of Taylor Pond.

The C8 Snowmobile Trail, a main connection route through Franklin and Clinton Counties, passes through this unit.

The snowmobile trail network in the complex connects with the Wilmington Snowmobile Trail and the community of Wilmington.

Vehicles and trailers can park at the Taylor Pond Campground, Catamount Trailhead, and Silver Lake Mountain Trail Head for access to snowmobile trails in the area.

Cross-country skiers and snowshoers may also use snowmobile trails. Snowmobilers should slow down when approaching and passing skiers or snowshoers.

Cross-country Skiing & Snowshoeing

cross country skiing
snow shoeing

General information on cross-country skiing and snowshoeing includes how-to and safety tips and links to rules & regulations

Cross-country skiing and snowshoeing are permitted on all seasonal access roads and hiking trails. The trails listed below are popular with cross-country skiers, most of them are also designated snowmobile trails.

The 10.5-mile Taylor Pond Loop Trail is a designated snowmobile trail and accesses three lean-tos on the shores of Taylor Pond.

Silver Lake Bog Trail is a one-mile hike to a bluff overlooking Silver Lake with a view of Whiteface Mountain on lands owned by and managed by the Nature Conservancy (leaves DEC website). The trail ascends 170 feet in the last quarter mile to the top of the bluff.

Military Pond Trail extends 5.7 miles along a dirt road from the Guideboard Road South Parking Area on the Black Brook Easement Tract to Military Pond in Terry Mountain State Forest. The trail passes Slush Pond 2.8 miles from the trailhead. There is no signage at the parking area and the trail is not marked.

When traveling on designated snowmobile trails, skiers and snowshoers should be alert for snowmobiles. Move to the side of the trail to allow snowmobiles to pass.

Wildlife Viewing

General information on animals includes links to information about birds, mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians and insects that inhabit or migrate through the state.

The Adirondacks contain large tracts of wildlife habitat with some boreal, bog, alpine and other unique habitats. Many birds (common loon, peregrine falcon) and mammals (moose, black bear) are unique to the Adirondacks or are mainly found here. Peregrine falcons nest on the cliffs of Poke-O-Moonshine Mountain.

Ausable Marsh Wildlife Management Area and Wickham Marsh Wildlife Management Area are popular locations for observing waterfowl and other birds. More than 50 species of mammals and hundreds of species of birds inhabit or pass through the Adirondacks at one time of the year or another.

Accessible Features

accessible features

General information on accessible recreation includes links to other locations with accessible recreation opportunities and information on permits for motorized access.

While there are currently no opportunities for accessible recreation within the wild forest there are accessible features in nearby Ausable Marsh Wildlife Management Area and Wickham Marsh Wildlife Management Area and Ausable Point Campground, which are popular locations for observing waterfowl and other birds. More than 50 species of mammals and hundreds of species of birds inhabit or pass through the Adirondacks at one time of the year or another.

Directions

All coordinates provided are in decimal degrees using NAD83/WGS84 datum.

Trailheads and Parking Areas

  • Poke-O-Moonshine Day Use Area Parking is located off State Route 9 approximately four miles south of Exit 33 of the Northway (I-87). (44.3892°N, 73.5075°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Poke-O-Moonshine Fire Tower/Observer's Trailhead is located along State Route 9 approximately five miles south of Exit 33 of the Northway (I-87) (44.4019°N, 73.5029°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Catamount Mountain Trailhead Parking Area is located on the north side of the Forestdale Road. (44.4431°N, 73.8799°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Silver Lake Mountain Trailhead Parking Area is located on the east side of the Silver Lake Road. (44.5110°N, 73.8483°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Taylor Pond Trailhead Parking Area is on the Nelson Road between the Silver Lake Road and the Forestdale Road. (44.4908°N, 73.8138°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Mud Pond (Route 3) Trailhead is located along State Route 3 opposite the parking area for the North Branch Saranac River Public Fishing Access site. (44.5763°N, 73.9255°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Guideboard Road South Parking Area is located off Guideboard Road on the Black Brook Easement Tract. (44.4764°N, 73.7448°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Silver Lake Bog Trailhead Parking Area is located on the west side of the Old Hawkeye Road off the Union Falls Road. (44.5113°N, 73.8826°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Boat and Hand Launch Sites

  • Taylor Pond Boat Launch is located at the Taylor Pond Campground off the Silver Lake Road. (44.4936°N, 73.8247°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Union Falls Hand Launch is located near off the Union Falls Road on the east side of the Union Falls Pond Dam. (44.5073°N, 73.9152°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)
  • Franklin Falls Pond Hand Launch is located along the River Road. The hand launch is designated for use by anglers only. (44.4158°N, 74.0026°W) Google Maps (leaves DEC website)

Rules, Regulations and Outdoor Safety

Practice Leave No Trace principles (Leaves DEC website) when recreating in the Adirondacks to enjoy the outdoors responsibly, minimize impact on the natural resources and avoid conflicts other backcountry users.

All users of the Taylor Pond Complex must follow all State Land Use Regulations and should follow all Outdoor Safety Practices for the safety of the user and protection of the resource.

How We Manage Taylor Pond Complex

DEC manages these lands in accordance with the management activities described in the Taylor Pond Complex Unit Management Plan. In addition to management objectives, the UMP contains detailed information on natural features, recreational infrastructure, geology, natural & human history, habitats, wildlife, fisheries and much more.

Nearby State Lands Amenities & Other Information

State Lands & Facilities

Gas may be found in the nearby communities of Ausable Forks, Bloomingdale, Keeseville, Redford, Saranac, Willsboro and Wilmington

Food and other supplies can be found in the nearby communities of Ausable Forks, Black Brook, Bloomingdale, Jay, Keeseville, Redford, Saranac, Willsboro and Wilmington

Dining opportunities can be found in the nearby communities of Ausable Forks, Bloomingdale, Keeseville, Redford, Saranac, Upper Jay, Willsboro and Wilmington

Lodging may be found in the nearby communities of Jay, Keeseville, Upper Jay, Willsboro and Wilmington

Adirondack Regional Tourism Council (leaves DEC website), Adirondack Coast (leaves DEC website), Adirondack Lakes (leaves DEC website) and Lake Placid-Essex County Tourism (leaves DEC website) can provide information about other recreation, attractions and amenities in this area.

Numerous guide books and maps are available with information on the lands, waters, trails and other recreational facilities in this area. These can be purchased at most outdoor equipment retailers, bookstores, and on-line booksellers.

Additional information, outdoor equipment, trip suggestions and guided or self-guided tours may be obtained from outdoor guide and outfitting businesses. Check area chambers of commerce, telephone directories or search the internet for listings.

Consider hiring an outdoor guide if you have little experience or woodland skills. See the NYS Outdoor Guides Association (Leaves DEC Website) for information on outdoor guides.