ENB - REGION 2 NOTICES

Completed Applications
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Negative Declaration

New York City (Brooklyn) County – The New York City Planning Commission, as lead agency, has determined that the proposed South Park Slope Rezoning (CEQR No. 06DCP014K, ULURP Nos. N060053 ZRK and 060054 ZMK) will not have a significant adverse environmental impact. The action involves the New York City Department of City Planning (DCP) proposes zoning map changes for a fifty block area located in the South Park Slope Area of Community District 7, Brooklyn, and a zoning text amendment that would apply in a portion of the rezoning area. The rezoning area is generally bounded by 15th Street on the north, Fourth Avenue on the west, Prospect Park West on the east, and 24th Street and Green-Wood Cemetery on the south. The proposed rezoning would change existing R5 districts to R5B districts; R6 districts to R5B, R6B, R6A and C4-3A districts; and on Fourth Avenue, R6 districts would change to R8A districts. The proposed rezoning would change existing commercial overlays from C1-3 and C2-3 to C2-4 districts, and reduce the overlay distance from 150 feet to 100 feet. Two C2-4 districts would also be added around Bartel Prichard Square. Additionally, the Department of City Planning proposes a text amendment to apply an Inclusionary Housing bonus to the proposed R8A district for the Fourth Avenue corridor of the rezoning area. The proposed text amendment would create incentives for the development of affordable housing. The proposed zoning would protect the relatively low-rise neighborhood character from out-of-scale development, and provide opportunities for apartment house construction and incentives for affordable housing on Fourth Avenue.

The amendments to the Zoning Map are as follows:

The proposed zoning text amendment would modify Zoning Resolution Section 23-00 and 35-31, to allow the use of an Inclusionary Housing bonus in all R8A zoning districts in Community District 7, Brooklyn. At this time, the proposed R8A district to be mapped on Fourth Avenue under the proposed rezoning would be the only R8A district in Brooklyn’s Community District 7. Currently, the maximum FAR in an R8A district is 6.02. The proposed text would reduce the maximum FAR permitted without the Inclusionary Housing bonus in the proposed R8A district from 6.02 to 5.4 and would allow a maximum FAR of 7.2, if affordable housing units are developed or preserved. The maximum FAR of 7.2 could be accomodated within the contextual height regulations of an R8A district.

Under the Inclusionary Housing program, developments providing affordable housing are eligible for a floor area bonus, within contextual height and bulk regulations. Affordable units can be provided either on the same site as the development earning the bonus, or off-site either through new construction or preservation of existing affordable units. Off-site affordable units must be located within the same Community District or within a half-mile of the bonused development. Available City, State, and Federal housing finance programs may be used to finance affordable units. The combination of a zoning bonus with housing programs establishes a powerful incentive for the development and preservation of affordable housing.

The purpose of the rezoning is to preserve neighborhood scale and character with contextual zoning districts; reinforce several of the avenues as corridors for mixed retail/residential buildings; and provide opportunities for housing development and incentives for affordable housing along the wide Fourth Avenue corridor. Over 500 units have been constructed or permitted in the past three years within the rezoning area. Many of these units are within buildings developed under the R6 Quality Housing (narrow street) program. Recent development in the area is generally appropriately-scaled and represents positive investment and revitalization of the area as market pressure for housing within the desirable Park Slope neighborhood extends further south. However, several out-of-scale nine to fourteen-story tower developments are proposed throughout the neighborhood that would erode the low-rise, rowhouse neighborhood character. The proposed South Park Slope rezoning is in part a response to this emerging trend.

Contact: Robert Dobruskin, New York City Planning Commission, 22 Reade Street, New York, NY 10007, phone: (212) 720–3423.


New York City (Staten Island ) County – The New York City Planning Commission, as lead agency, has determined that the proposed Staten Island Commercial Rezoning (CEQR No. 06DCP015R, ULURP Nos. 060061 ZMR, 060062 ZMR, 060063 ZMR) will not have a significant adverse environmental impact. The Department of City Planning (DCP) is proposing to rezone three distinct areas within Staten Island Community Districts 1, 2, and 3.

Overdevelopment and inappropriate development have increasingly become two of the more significant planning issues facing Staten Island. During the period from 1990 to 2000, Staten Island was the fastest growing county in New York State. This population increase and the subsequent need for housing has exacerbated concerns about development on Staten Island and the effects it is having on established neighborhood character, parking availability, traffic congestion, and the overall quality of life.

In response to development concerns, on July 25, 2003, Mayor Bloomberg announced the formation of the Staten Island Growth Management Task Force. The Task Force consists of elected officials, City agency commissioners, representative of Staten Island civic and community organizations, and professional organizations. The Task Force recommended a number of changes that would result in less dense development, more required on-site parking, the demolition of fewer existing homes, and regulations for new developments– including those developed under private road regulations – that would be more compatible with the exiting neighborhoods.

The proposed rule changes for commerical zoning in Staten Island required an analysis of existing commercial areas to ensure that their existing zoning designation would conform to the new rules. Three commercial areas were identified for rezoning to ensure that any future development in these areas would follow the appropriate new rules. DCP proposes that the following commercial areas be rezoned.

Richmond Avenue at Arthur Kill Road
Portions of this three–block commercial area at the southeast corner of Richmond Avenue and Arthur Kill Road are currently zoned as C4–2, C2–1 and C2–2/R3–2. The existing commercial development in this neighborhood, located just south of the Staten Island Mall, reflects many of the same attributes of the larger regional commercial development – large parking areas and buildings designed to attract customers from a larger region traveling by auto.

DCP proposes that this area be rezoned to C4–1 to incorporate the new rules proposed for regional commercial areas. A special permit would be required for any proposed residential development in this area.

New Dorp Lane
This eight block commercial area of New Dorp Lane between Hyland Boulevard and the Staten Island Rail Station is currently zoned C4–2 which allows an R6 equivalent residential development. The existing neighborhood consists primarily of retail and residential uses along New Dorp Lane. The proposed C4–2 rule changes are designed to accommodate commercial and mixed–use development in the denser, larger, historic districts of Stapleton, St. George and Port Richmond. These new rules would be inappropriate to the existing form of commercial development on New Dorp Lane.

DCP proposes that this area of New Dorp Lane be rezoned to a commercial overlay C2–2 with an underlying residential district of R3–2. In addition, the homes located on the boundary of the existing C4–2 district, fronting Jacques Avenue, should be rezoned as part of the existing R3X district located across the street. Future development on New Dorp Lane will be limited to commercial or mixed–used buildings.

Castleton
This six block commercial area on Castleton Avenue between Dongan Street and Alaska Street is currently zoned C4–2 which allows an R6 equivalent residential development. The existing neighborhood consists primarily of retail and residential uses along Castleton Avenue. The proposed C4–2 rule changes are designed to accommodate commercial and mixed-use development in the denser, larger, historic districts of Stapleton, St. George and Port Richmond. These new rules would be inappropriate to the existing form of commercial development on Castleton Avenue.

DCP proposes that this area be rezoned to a commercial overlay C2–2 with an underlying residential district of R3–2. Future development will be limited to commercial or mixed–used buildings only.

The proposed C4–1 rezonings are dependent upon a concurrent but separate text amendment, the Lower Density Growth Management Commercial Text Amendment, (CEQR No. 06DCP013R and ULURP No. N060066 ZRR). The proposed text amendment would affect zoning provisions governing commercial and residential development in the Lower Density Growth Management areas of Staten Island. The potential environmental effects of the text amendment are discussed in an Environmental Assessment Statement that has been prepared for the proposal.

Contact: Robert Dobruskin, New York City Planning Commission, 22 Reade Street, New York, NY 10007, phone: (212) 720–3423.


New York City (Staten Island) County – The New York City Planning Commission, as lead agency, has determined that the proposed Lower Density Growth Management Commercial Text Amendment (CEQR No. 06DCP013R, ULURP No. N060066 ZRR) will not have a significant adverse environmental impact. The action involves:

Lower Density Growth Management Commercial Text Amendment
The Department of City Planning (DCP) proposes to amend the Zoning Resolution to change Sections 12-10; 32-11; 32-43; 32-431; 32–432; 32–433; 35–23; 37–20; 37–22; and 74–49. The proposed text amendments would apply to C1, C2, C4 districts in the Lower Density Growth Management Area (LDGMA) of Staten Island Community Districts 1, 2 and 3 and are intended to continue the effort of the LDGMA Text Amendment adopted in 2004.

DCP proposes to amend the following Zoning Resolution (ZR) Sections:

12-10 – DEFINITIONS Lower Density Growth Management Area,
32-11 – Use Groups 1 and 2,
32-43 – Ground Floor Uses in Certain Locations,
32-431 – Ground floor use in C1-8A, C1-9A, C2-7A, C2-8A, C4-6A and C4-7A Districts
32-432 – Ground floor use in Community Board 7, Borough of Manhattan
32-433 – Ground floor use in C1, C2 and C4 Districts in the Borough of Staten Island
35-23 – Residential Bulk Regulations in Other C1 or C2 Districts or in C3, C4, C5 or C6 Districts
37-20 – Special Regulations for Lower Density Growth Management Areas in SI
37-22 – Street Tree Planting Requirements in C1, C2 and C4 Districts 74-49 Residential Use in C4-1 Districts in Staten Island.

The proposed text amendments would include the following changes in LDGMA areas of Staten Island:.

PROPOSED TEXT CHANGES: ALL C1, C2, AND C4 DISTRICTS

Contact: Robert Dobruskin, New York City Planning Commission, 22 Reade Street, New York, NY 10007, phone: (212) 720–3423.


New York City (Bronx) County – The New York City Planning Commission, as lead agency, has determined that the proposed Olinville Zoning Map and Text Amendments will not have a significant adverse environmental impact.

The New York City Department of City Planning (DCP) is proposing Zoning Map amendments for all or portions of 36 blocks in the Bronx neighborhood of Olinville, Community District 12. The rezoning area includes a northern portion bounded by 219th Street to the north, White Plains Road to the east, East Gun Hill Road to the south and Bronx Boulevard to the west and a southern portion bounded by East Gun Hill Road to the north, Lurting Avenue to the east, Adee Avenue to the south and Bronx Boulevard to the west. In addition, DCP is proposing a text amendment to the Zoning Resolution (ZR) establishing a new zoning district, R5A. The goal of DCP’s proposed actions is to reinforce neighborhood context where appropriate and prevent out–of–character development in those areas where existing zoning designations are not reflective of the established patterns. The proposed action would not induce additional development.

The amendments to the Zoning Map are as follows:

In addition to the aforementioned zoning map amendments, DCP is also proposing a zoning text amendment to ZR Section 11–12 establishing the R5A Zoning Designation. The proposed R5A district is a detached residence district in which development would be limited to one and two family residences with a maximum FAR of 1.1. In addition to mapping the R5A district in Olinville, DCP is studying the possibility of mapping it in other areas of the Bronx.

Contact: Robert Dobruskin, New York City Planning Commission, 22 Reade Street, New York, NY 10007, phone: (212) 720–3423.


Notice Of Acceptance Of Draft EIS And Public Hearing

New York City (Bronx) County – The FHWA/NYCDOT, as lead agencies, have accepted a Draft Environmental Impact Statement on the proposed Willis Avenue Bridge Reconstruction Project, Project Identification No. X757.00. Two public hearings are to be held, one in New York County (Manhattan) and one in Bronx County. Subsequent notice will be given as to the time and place of the public hearings. Written comments on the Draft EIS will be accepted until October 28, 2005. The action involves the reconstruction of the 100–year–old Willis Avenue Bridge over the Harlem River between Manhattan and the Bronx. In the Bronx, the Willis Avenue Bridge also traverses over the Harlem River Yard, a waterfront intermodal (rail/truck) transfer facility and industrial/commercial park. The project includes the complete replacement of the bridge with a new swing span and flanking girder spans on each side, on a new alignment immediately south of the existing bridge. New approaches and ramps would transition back to the existing connections with the street and arterial highway networks. The overall length of the replacement bridge would be 1,464 meters (4,803 feet), with 1,027 meters (3,370 feet) of structure and 437 meters (1,434 feet) of approach roadways. Funding for the project is being sought from the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in conjunction with the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT). The FHWA is the Federal Lead Agency sponsoring the Willis Avenue Bridge reconstruction, which will be undertaken by the New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT). The Willis Avenue Bridge spans the Harlem River connecting First Avenue and the northbound Franklin Delano Roosevelt Drive in Manhattan, to Willis Avenue and Bruckner Boulevard in the Bronx.

Contact: Douglas Currey, NYSDOT, Region 11, Hunters Point Plaza, 47–40 21st Street, Long Island City, NY 11101, (718) 482-4594; Robert Arnold, FHWA, Division Administrator, Leo O’Brien Federal Building, Clinton Ave. & North Pearl St., Albany, NY 12207, phone: (518) 431–4125; Balram Chandiramani, Movable Bridges Group, NYCDOT, 2 Rector Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10006, phone: (212) 788–1830.