ENB - REGION 2 NOTICES

Completed Applications
Consolidated SPDES Renewals

6NYCRR Part 41 - Notice of Proposed Rule Making

Pursuant to the Environmental Conservation Law, Sections 13-0307 and 13-0319, the Department of Environmental Conservation hereby gives notice of the following:

Notice of Proposed Rule Making for 6NYCRR Part 41 relating to the sanitary condition of shellfish lands. This notice will be published in issue 44 of the State Register, dated 11/3/2004.

For further information contact:
Julie Ventaloro, Bureau of Marine Resources
Division of Fish, Wildlife and Marine Resources
205 N. Belle Meade Rd.. Suite 1
East Setauket, NY 11733
Telephone: (631) 444-0492
E-mail: jlvental@gw.dec.state.ny.us


Brownfield Cleanup Program

220 Water Street
City of Brooklyn, Kings County
State of New York

Pursuant to ECL 27-1407 and 1417

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (Department) administers the Brownfield Cleanup Program pursuant to ECL 27-1400 et seq. The Brownfield Cleanup Program is designed to encourage the remediation of contaminated properties known as brownfields for reuse and redevelopment. Hawthorne Village, LLC has submitted an application to participate in the Brownfield Cleanup Program. The application was determined to be complete by the Department on October 20, 2004. The property described in the application is located at 220 Water Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201. The application proposes that the applicant will conduct investigation and/or remedial activities at the site. The application proposes that the site will be used for commercial and residential purposes.

The Department will receive public comments concerning the application for thirty days from October 27, 2004 through November 26, 2004. After review of the application and any public comments received, the Department will determine whether to accept the Applicant‘s request to participate in the Brownfield Cleanup Program. If the Department accepts the Applicant‘s request to participate, it will execute a Brownfield Cleanup Agreement (BCA) with the Applicant. By executing a BCA, the Applicant would commit to undertake certain remedial activities under the Department‘s oversight. A copy of the application as well as a copy of its supporting documentation and Phase I Environmental Site Assessments dated 11/19/95, 7/13/01 and 6/3/04; Phase II Environmental Site Assessment and Lead-Based Paint Sampling Report (6/9/04); and a Phase II Follow-Up Environmental Site Assessment (7/16/04) are available in the document repository for this site located at the Walt Whitman Public Library, 93 Saint Edwards Street, Brooklyn, New York 11205.

The referenced documents are draft and have not been reviewed by the Department staff prior to their release for public comment. The Department, in conjunction with the New York State Department of Health will review these documents during the public comment period.

All citizens are encouraged to offer comments in writing to and refer questions to:

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
625 Broadway
Albany, New York 12233-7016
ATTN: David Smith


West 61st Street Site
City of New York, New York County
State of New York

Pursuant to ECL 27-1407 and 1417

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (Department) administers the Brownfield Cleanup Program pursuant to ECL 27-1400 et seq. The Brownfield Cleanup Program is designed to encourage the remediation of contaminated properties known as brownfields for reuse and redevelopment. West 60th Street Associates, LLC; West End Enterprises, LLC has submitted an application to participate in the Brownfield Cleanup Program. The application was determined to be complete by the Department on October 20, 2004. The property described in the application is located at 229-251 West 60th Street and 218-240 West 61st Street, New York, New York 10023. The application proposes that the applicant will conduct investigation and/or remedial activities at the site. The application proposes that the site will be used for residential, medical office and parking purposes.

The Department will receive public comments concerning the application for thirty days from October 27, 2004 through November 26, 2004. After review of the application and any public comments received, the Department will determine whether to accept the Applicantís request to participate in the Brownfield Cleanup Program. If the Department accepts the Applicantís request to participate, it will execute a Brownfield Cleanup Agreement (BCA) with the Applicant. By executing a BCA, the Applicant would commit to undertake certain remedial activities under the Departmentís oversight. A copy of the application as well as a copy of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Report and applicable attachments are available in the document repository for this site located at the New York Public Library - Riverside Branch, 127 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, New York 10023.

The referenced documents are draft and have not been reviewed by the Department staff prior to their release for public comment. The Department, in conjunction with the New York State Department of Health will review these documents during the public comment period.

All citizens are encouraged to offer comments in writing to and refer questions to:

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
Region 2
47-40 21st Street
Long Island City, New York 11101
ATTN: Shaminder Chawla


Gowanus Village 1, LLC
City of Brooklyn, Kings County
State of New York

Pursuant to ECL 27-1407 and 1417

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (Department) administers the Brownfield Cleanup Program pursuant to ECL 27-1400 et seq. The Brownfield Cleanup Program is designed to encourage the remediation of contaminated properties known as brownfields for reuse and redevelopment. Gowanus Village 1, LLC has submitted an application to participate in the Brownfield Cleanup Program. The application was determined to be complete by the Department on October 20, 2004. The property described in the application is located at 430 Carroll Street / 153 2nd Street, Brooklyn, NY 11217. The application proposes that the applicant will conduct investigation and/or remedial activities at the site. The application proposes that the site will be used for residential purposes.

The Department will receive public comments concerning the application for thirty days from October 27, 2004 through November 26, 2004. After review of the application and any public comments received, the Department will determine whether to accept the Applicantís request to participate in the Brownfield Cleanup Program. If the Department accepts the Applicantís request to participate, it will execute a Brownfield Cleanup Agreement (BCA) with the Applicant. By executing a BCA, the Applicant would commit to undertake certain remedial activities under the Departmentís oversight. A copy of the application as well as a copy of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment Report and applicable attachments are available in the document repository for this site located at the Brooklyn Public Library, Carroll Gardina Branch, 396 Clinton Street, Brooklyn, NY 11231.

The referenced documents are draft and have not been reviewed by the Department staff prior to their release for public comment. The Department, in conjunction with the New York State Department of Health will review these documents during the public comment period.

All citizens are encouraged to offer comments in writing to and refer questions to:

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation
625 Broadway
Albany, New York 12233-7016
ATTN: David Smith


Negative Declaration

New York City County - NYC Department of Environmental Protection, as lead agency, has determined that the proposed Wards Island 3 Modular Facilities will not have a significant adverse environmental impact. The action involves the proposed assembly of two new pre-fabricated modular office buildings (Collections Facility North (CFN) building and Transportation building) and one new pre-fabricated storage building (‘Butler‘ building) on currently vacant land in the southwest section of the WPCP site. The construction of a new 27-space parking lot is also proposed. The project is located in the southwest section of the Wards Island Water Pollution Control Plant (WPCP) on Wards Island (Block 1819, Lot 15) in the Borough of Manhattan‘s Community Board 11.

Contact: Lauren Gallagher, 59-17 Junction Boulevard, 11th floor, Flushing, NY 11373, phone: (718) 595-4351, fax: (718) 595-4479, Email: lgallagher@dep.nyc.gov.


New York City (Brooklyn) County - The New York City Planning Commission, as lead agency, has determined that the proposed Special Bay Ridge District Rezoning and Text Amendment, (CEQR No. 05DCP023K, ULURP Nos. N050133 ZRK, 050134 ZMK) will not have a significant adverse environmental impact. The action involves the New York City Department of City Planning, proposing amendments to the zoning map and zoning text amendments to Zoning Resolution (ZR) Section 114-00 for the 249 block Special Bay Ridge District (SBRD) in the Bay Ridge section of Brooklyn Community District 10. The proposed zoning map amendments for the SBRD are as follows:

The proposed zoning text amendment would eliminate the SBRD‘s preservation sub-areas which comprise the majority of the text. Future land use development would be regulated by the proposed contextual districts. The following SBRD regulations would be maintained or modified as they provide additional protections greater then those of the proposed underlying districts:

The proposed zoning changes would preserve neighborhood scale and character through the mapping of lower density and contextual zoning districts and revisions to the existing special district text. These proposed zoning changes would protect the detached, semi-detached and limestone rowhouse character of most neighborhood mid-blocks and would reinforce several of the avenues as corridors for mid-rise mixed retail/residential buildings and larger elevator buildings. The proposed rezoning would utilize a range of lower density and contextual zoning districts that would preserve and protect existing building types and their neighborhood context. These lower density and contextual districts would match the existing built conditions. The proposed districts would have bulk regulations governing building type, FAR, lot width, lot area, height, density, side yards, curb cuts and parking which provide substantially more protection than the existing SBRD regulations.

Sites expected to be developed as a result of the proposed action include four projected development sites. There are ten potential development sites that are considered less likely to be developed. Under existing zoning approximately 25 dwelling units, 38,555 square feet of commercial floor area and 51,982 square feet of community facility floor area could be developed by 2014. Under the proposed action, it is projected that when compared to the development that could occur in the future without the proposed action, a net gain of approximately 42 dwelling units, 9,855 square feet of commercial floor area and 12,995 square feet of community facility floor could be developed by 2014.

Contact: Robert Dobruskin, New York City Planning Commission, 22 Reade Street, New York, NY 10007, phone: (212) 720-3423.


Notice Of Acceptance Of Draft EIS

Name of Action: New Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan

CEQR #: 03DOS004Y

SEQRA Classification: Type I

Lead Agency: New York City Department of Sanitation, 125 Worth Street, NY, NY 10013

Location: Citywide

This notice is issued pursuant to Article 8 (State Environmental Quality Review Act - SEQRA) of the Environmental Conservation Law; 6 NYCRR Part 617, the regulations implementing SEQRA; and the City Environmental Quality Review procedures set forth in Executive Order 91 of 1977 as amended (43 RCNY Chapter 6) and Chapter 5, Title 62 of the Rules of the City of New York (CEQR). The Department of Sanitation for the City of New York (DSNY) is proposing a new Solid Waste Management Plan for the 20-year planning period 2004-2024 (New SWMP), together with related solid waste management facility development and procurement (collectively, the Proposed Action). A Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) has been prepared for the Proposed Action pursuant to a public scoping and enhanced outreach process, including a series of public scoping meetings held between June 15 and July 1, 2004. DSNY as lead agency has determined that the DEIS is adequate with respect to scope and content and is now available for public review. The DEIS may be inspected at the offices of the contact person below or at public repositories located in each of the five boroughs, listed below. The DEIS is available on the Departmentís website http://nyc.gov/sanitation, together with the Final Scope. Comments on the DEIS are requested and will be received and reviewed by DSNY at its offices. To be considered, public comments must be received by the Contact Person designated below by 5 pm on December 22, 2004. A series of public hearings also will be held on the DEIS and the related permit applications. Notice will be given as to the time and place of the public hearings at least 14 days in advance of the first hearing date. For further information or to obtain a compact disc (CD) of the DEIS, please contact:

Harry Szarpanski, Assistant Commissioner
New York City Department of Sanitation
44 Beaver Street, 12th Floor
New York, NY 10004
Phone: (917) 237-5520
Fax: (212) 269-0788

The repositories for the DEIS are located as follows:
Repository Location Repository Address Days and Hours of Operation Phone Number
Manhattan Community Board 8 Office 505 Park Avenue call for days and hours (212) 758-4340
NYCDEP Office of Environmental Coordination 100 Gold Street, Manhattan M-F, 9-5 (212) 788-9956
96th Street Regional Public Library 112 East 96th Street M/Th 12-8;Tu/F 1-6; W 10-4; Sa 10-5; closed Sun (212) 289-0908
Manhattan Community Board 9 office 565 West 125th Street call for days and hours (212) 864-6200
George Bruce Public Library 518 West 125th Street M 10-6; W 12-8; Th 11-6; F 1-6; Sa 10-5; closed Tu/Sun (212) 662-9727
Manhattan Community Board 4 Office 330 West 42nd Street, 26th Floor call for days and hours (212) 736-4536
Riverside Public Library (Community Bd 7) 127 Amsterdam Avenue at West 65th Street M 10-6; W 12-8; Th 1-8; F 1-6; Sat 10-5; Closed Tu/Sun (212) 870-1810
Brooklyn Community Board 7 office 4201 4th Avenue call for days and hours (718) 854-0003
Sunset Park Public Library 5108 4th Avenue at 51st M 1-8; T, Th/F 1-6; W 10-6; Sa 10-5; closed Sun (718) 567-2806
Brooklyn Community Board 11 Office 2214 Bath Avenue call for days and hours (718) 266-8800
New Utrecht Public Library 1743 86th Street at Bay 17th Street M/Th 1-6; Tu 1-8; W/F 10-6; Sa 10-5 (718) 236-4086
Brooklyn Community Board 1 Office 435 Graham Avenue call for days and hours (718) 389-0009
Leonard Public Library 8 Devoe Street at Leonard Street M 1-8; Tu/Th/F 1-6; W 10-6; closed wkend (718) 486-3365
Queens Community Board 2 Office 43-22 50th Street, Woodside call for days and hours (718) 533-8773
Court Square Public Library 25-01 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City M 12-7; Tu 1-6; W 10-6; Th/F 12-6; closed wkend (718) 937-2790
Queens Community Board 7 Office 45-35 Kissena Boulevard, Flushing call for days and hours (718) 359-2800
Mitchell-Linden Public Library 29-42 Union Street, Flushing M/Th 1-8, Tu 1-6, W/F 10-6; closed wkend (718) 539-2330
Bronx Community Board 2 Office 1029 East 163rd Street call for days and hours (718) 328-9125/6
Hunts Point Regional Public Library 877 Southern Boulevard at Tiffany Street M 12-7; Tu/Th 10-6; W/F 1-6; Sa 10-5; closed Sun (718) 617-0338
Bronx Community Board 1 Office 384 East 149th Street call for days and hours (718) 585-7117
Woodstock Public Library 761 East 160th Street, west of Prospect Avenue M/Tu 10-6; W 11-6; Th 12-7; F 1-6; closed wkend (718) 665-6255
St. George Library Center 5 Central Avenue, S.I. Call for days and hours (718) 442-8560
Office of the Borough President Borough Hall, Room 120, S.I. M-F, 9-5 (718) 816-2200

Location of Action: City-wide, with certain specific sites for solid waste management facilities to include four existing DSNY Marine Transfer Station (MTS) sites: Southwest Brooklyn MTS, Shore Parkway at Bay 41st Street, Brooklyn; Hamilton Avenue MTS, Hamilton Avenue near Second Avenue at the Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn; East 91st Street MTS, East 91st Street and York Avenue, Manhattan; and North Shore MTS, 31st Avenue and 122nd Street, Queens. DSNY would contract with up to five existing private transfer stations for DSNY-managed waste (see below for locations. The Action would also involve the existing MTS located at West 59th Street and Marginal Street, Manhattan, the 30th Street Pier in the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal, and the site of the former DSNY MTS facility on Pier 52 at Gansevoort Street in the Hudson River Park or another Manhattan waterfront location to be identified.

Description of Proposed Action: The New SWMP would provide for the management of all solid waste generated in New York City for the 20-year planning period, approximately 50,000 tons per day (tpd), as required under the Environmental Conservation Law for the permitting of new solid waste management facilities. The New SWMP incorporates certain elements of the existing SWMP, which was approved in 1992 and subsequently amended, and proposes changes to the City's Long Term Export Program for DSNY-managed Waste, to the City's Recycling Program, and to management of commercial waste in the City. The Planning Unit is the City of New York. The New SWMP requires approval by the New York City Council and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC). In addition, the New SWMP elements related to the siting of the four proposed Converted MTSs require discretionary approval from the New York City Planning Commission pursuant to Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP), DEC, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York State Office of General Services, and certain other approvals.

DSNY collects solid waste from residents, not-for-profit institutions and other City, state and federal agencies, as well as waste from special DSNY operations such as street and lot-cleaning operations. This waste consists of refuse (mostly collected from curbside) and source-separated recyclables (collectively, DSNY-managed waste). In FY 2002, this DSNY-managed waste averaged approximately 11,123 tpd of refuse and 2,555 tpd of separately collected recyclables: newspaper and mixed paper; metal, glass and certain plastics (MGP) and yard wastes. DSNY-managed refuse is exported from the City under short-term contracts entered into for the phased closure of the City's Fresh Kills landfill, which closed completely in March 2001 pursuant to state law. DSNY delivers some of this refuse in collection vehicles directly to disposal facilities or private transfer stations outside of New York City, a smaller portion to a private transfer station in the Bronx where it is loaded onto rail for further transport, and approximately half of this refuse to other private transfer stations in the City, which load it onto truck trailers for further transport out of the City for disposal. Under a 20-year contract DSNY delivers much of the recyclable paper to the West 59th Street MTS for transport by barge to a private paper mill on Staten Island, while DSNY delivers the remaining paper and the MGP to other private recyclables handling and processing facilities in Queens, Brooklyn, the Bronx and New Jersey. DSNY also collects leaves and yard waste seasonally for composting. Other DSNY and City managed wastes that are recycled (derelict vehicles, auto tires, lot cleaning, asphalt and asphalt millings from road resurfacing, interagency road material reuse, etc.) totalled approximately 2,840 tpd in FY2002. Commercial carters collect waste generated by the private sector, such as commercial construction and demolition debris (C&D debris), soil and rock from excavations (clean fill), and refuse and source-separated recyclables from business establishments (collectively, Commercial Waste). In 2003, commercial waste quantities generated in the City averaged approximately 7,248 tpd of putrescible waste (having organic matter that causes odors), 2,641 tpd of designated recyclable waste (mainly paper and metal); 8,626 tpd of non-putrescible C&D debris (excluding clean fill), and 19,069 tpd of clean fill material. Much C&D debris, and virtually all clean fill material, is recycled. Other waste generated in the City but not managed by DSNY includes medical waste, dredge spoils, and biosolids from water pollution control plants.

New SWMP

The New SWMP identifies the quantity and types of solid waste generated in the City and the proposed or existing solid waste management facilities used to manage such waste, and makes projections of future population, waste generation and changes to the waste stream. It determines the appropriate capacity of DSNY's solid waste management facilities, such as the proposed Converted Marine Transfer Stations discussed below, to process DSNY-managed putrescible waste, analyzes various alternatives, and assesses the potential impacts associated with each alternative. The principal elements of the Proposed Action are described more fully in the New SWMP, issued for public review in October 2004. As outlined below, this New SWMP will generally continue the City's waste reduction and recycling programs and reliance on the export of non-recyclable municipal solid waste from the City for disposal, but includes a major initiative for the recycling program, and will rely more on barge and rail transport of DSNY-managed waste. In addition, the New SWMP includes several initiatives designed to address issues related to the management of commercial waste in the City.

Waste Reduction and Recycling Elements

A proposed change to DSNY's recycling program would be a 20-year contract for the receipt, processing and marketing of source-separated recyclable MGP and a portion of the City's paper. DSNY would procure services from a new private recyclables recovery and processing facility to be built by Hugo Neu Corporation (HNC) at the 30th Street Pier in the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal (SBMT). This facility would require the removal of piling remnants, dredging of 40,000 cubic feet of material, and the construction of two 400-foot long by 60-foot wide docks on piles, a 50,000 square foot (sf) enclosed receiving building for unloading two barges with an overhead crane and receiving truckloads of recyclables, a 60,000 sf processing area for mixed recyclables, a 50,000 sf area for baling and storage of MGP (non-ferrous metals) and residue, an area for metals processing and a 76,000 sf glass processing area, a 32,000 sf loading area for outbound barges for metal and glass, container storage, load out docks, two truck scales, a 3-story 20,000 sf administration building/visitor's center with parking, and fencing (numbers approximate). Approximately 85% of the recyclables would be delivered by barge to this facility, and 75% will leave post-processing via barge. DSNY trucks collecting curbside recyclables in the Bronx would tip this material at the existing HNC facility in the Bronx from which it would be transported by barge to the SBMT facility. DSNY trucks collecting curbside recyclables in northern Brooklyn and Queens would tip this material at HNC's facility in Long Island City, from which it would be transported by barge to the SBMT facility. DSNY trucks collecting curbside recyclables from southern Brooklyn would tip their material directly at the SBMT facility.

In addition, DSNY proposes to construct and operate a recyclables acceptance facility (recyclables handling and recovery facility under 6 NYCRR ß360-12) at the former DSNY MTS facility on Pier 52 at Gansevoort Street in the Hudson River Park or at another location on the Manhattan waterfront, at which MGP and certain paper would be transferred to barge for transport to the HNC facility at the SBMT in Brooklyn for processing. This recyclables acceptance facility would require amendment of the Hudson River Park Act and would be the subject of a supplemental environmental review once a facility design is developed. DSNY would no longer deliver recyclable paper to the West 59th Street MTS in Manhattan, but would take it instead to the new recyclables acceptance facility for further transport by barge.

The New SWMP also discusses certain waste reduction, reuse and recycling program initiatives. These include, among other things, conducting a comprehensive waste characterization study, undertaking an electronics recycling effort, adding a website for the NYC Stuff Exchange, expanding the NY Wa$teMatch industrial materials exchange program, and enhancing education and outreach efforts.

Long Term Export Elements

The New SWMP continues DSNY's planned use of the Staten Island Transfer Station, at 310 West Service Road, Staten Island, to which a rail connection is under construction, for the long-term export of containerized Staten Island residential refuse. Certain New SWMP elements and procurements for other DSNY-managed refuse would be as follows:

For the four wastesheds to be served by Converted MTS's, DSNY would also enter into 20-year service agreements with one or more waste management companies for transport of containerized waste by barge directly from an MTS to disposal facilities or to intermodal facilities for transloading to railcars or a larger barge for further transport to an appropriately permitted out-of-City disposal facility. The new Converted MTS facilities would require solid waste management facility permits from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and other approvals. They would in include, among other things, a dedicated waste tipping floor, container cranes and associated environmental controls, and a slightly larger footprint than the existing facilities. The facilities would have state-of-the-art odor controls that neutralize odor rather than mask it with a scent, and would be equipped with sufficient ventilation to maintain negative air pressure to prevent the escape of untreated air from building openings. Sufficient on-site queuing areas and tipping bays would be provided at all MTS facilities to prevent the queuing of DSNY trucks on public streets at all times. The barges serving the converted MTS's could carry up to 48 intermodal containers each containing up to 22 tons of waste and would be towed by tugboat to intermodal facilities, where the containers would be transloaded to trains or ocean-going vessels for transport to out-of-City disposal facilities. The Hamilton Avenue Converted MTS would include the construction of a kingpile bulkhead wall. Support facilities for the Converted MTSs may include the 52nd Street Barge Staging Area at 52nd Street and First Avenue, Brooklyn used by DSNY in the past, an intermodal Barge-to-Rail yard located at Waste Management's Harlem River Yard transfer station facility at East 132nd Street and St. Ann's Avenue in the Bronx, and an intermodal Barge-to-Rail yard (65th Street Rail Yard) in Brooklyn.

Four of the five private transfer stations proposed for the Long Term Export program would require permit modifications to the facilities for barge or rail export and/or expansions of their existing permitted capacities. The Waste Management truck to rail transfer station at Harlem River Yard in the Bronx would require no permit modifications to accept DSNY-managed waste under long term contracts. The Allied Waste Services Transfer Station (truck-to-truck-to rail) at East 132nd Street in the Bronx would require the minor addition of a lidding facility. The Waste Management transfer station at 485 Scott Avenue, Brooklyn would require a containerization floor plan, lidding area, bulkhead and platform for the loadout of containers onto barges. The Allied Waste Services transfer station at 72 Scott Avenue/598 Scholes Street, Brooklyn (proposed as truck-to-rail) would require the consolidation of operations among three separate facilities and certain rail improvements, and a 1148 tpd expansion in permitted capacity. The Waste Management transfer station at 30-58 Review Avenue would expand its permitted capacity by 242 tpd and modify the facility to add containerization, a lidding area, and (for the truck to barge option) a bulkhead and platform for the loadout of containers onto barges. Two alternative proposals for Brooklyn for the same site on Meserole Street on both sides of Gardner Avenue between Scott Avenue and Stewart Avenue would involve the construction and permitting of a new truck-to-rail transfer station with a 2000 tpd capacity.

Commercial Waste Elements

The New SWMP proposes to allow and encourage a certain amount of locally-generated commercial putrescible solid waste to be received and containerized at the Converted MTSs, in quantities that would not exceed relevant environmental thresholds. Such commercial waste would be accepted during the 8:00 pm to 8:00 am period. The East 91st Street MTS could potentially receive up to 780 tpd, North Shore MTS up to 1000 tpd, Hamilton Avenue MTS up to 1274 tpd, and Southwest Brooklyn MTS up to 828 tpd, respectively, of commercial putrescible waste. In addition, the New SWMP proposes to make the existing West 59th Street MTS available to private waste management companies to use for the transfer of commercial putrescible waste collected by private carters in Manhattan. The facility could be refurbished and used to tip uncontainerized waste into hopper barges as in the past, which would be unloaded at an enclosed barge unloading facility (EBUF) developed elsewhere. Alternatively, the facility could be redeveloped as a containerization facility. In addition, through the procurement process for private transfer station and disposal services for Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens DSNY-managed waste outlined above, DSNY proposes to secure agreement from the transfer station operator that all commercial waste (in addition to DSNY-managed waste) exported from the facility would be containerized and exported by barge and/or rail, and thus reduce out-bound transfer trailer traffic. The New SWMP discusses certain other recent or pending DSNY initiatives related to stricter regulation of commercial waste transfer stations in the City and additional limits on where such facilities may be sited.

Environmental Review

The DEIS provides an environmental review of 17 sites/facilities that are elements of the Proposed Action for the New SWMP. (Final site selection for certain elements of the Proposed Action is dependent upon the outcome of current procurement actions by DSNY.) In compliance with CEQR/SEQRA, the DEIS addressed: Land Use, Zoning, and Public Policy; Socioeconomic Conditions; Community Facilities and Services; Open Space; Cultural Resources; Urban Design, Visual Resources, and Shadows; Neighborhood Character; Natural Resources; Hazardous Materials; Water Quality; Waterfront Revitalization Program; Infrastructure, Solid Waste and Sanitation Services, and Energy; Traffic, Parking, Transit, and Pedestrians; Air Quality; Odor; Noise; Public Health; and Construction Impacts.

Both the East 132nd Street Truck-to-Truck-to-Rail Transfer Station in the Bronx and the Review Avenue Truck-to-Truck-to-Rail Transfer Station in Queens would dray containers between the respective transfer stations and intermodal rail yards that are in the project service areas but not directly at the transfer station facilities. These intermodal yards are existing facilities that do not require discretionary approvals. The DEIS considered the movement of containers on tractor chassis between the transfer stations and the intermodal yards. The timetable for designing and permitting the proposed Recyclables Acceptance Facility on the Manhattan waterfront is approximately seven years, and therefore supplemental environmental review of this facility would occur once necessary information is available.

The Proposed Action would generally result in a reduction in truck traffic from facilities that currently export DSNY-managed waste by transfer trailer, as this waste would be exported by barge or rail. Using the applicable impact thresholds from the CEQR Technical Manual of 2001 as supplemented by relevant guidance from the NYC Department of Environmental Protection (such as for the analysis of fine particulate matter known as PM2.5), the only potential impacts that were estimated to be significant without mitigation were with respect to traffic and noise, and all such impacts could be mitigated and are proposed to be mitigated. For the Proposed Action, the following measures were identified to mitigate estimated significant adverse impacts related to traffic and noise, respectively: