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6.0 Monitoring Strategy

Visibility conditions representative of those within the Class I areas is monitored by the IMPROVE program. In the mid-1980's, the IMPROVE program was established to measure visibility impairment in mandatory Class I areas throughout the United States. The monitoring sites are operated and maintained through a formal cooperative relationship between the EPA, National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and U.S. Forest Service. In 1991, several additional organizations joined the effort: State and Territorial Air Pollution Program Administrators and the Association of Local Air Pollution Control (which now is called the National Association of Clean Air Agencies) Officials, Western States Air Resources Council, Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association, and Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management.

A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for the IMPROVE program, dated March 2002, can be found at:

http://vista.cira.colostate.edu/improve/Publications/QA_QC/IMPROVE_QAPP_R0.pdf

6.1 IMPROVE Program Objectives

Data collected at these sites are used by land managers, industry planners, scientists, public interest groups, and air quality regulators to understand and protect the visual air quality resource in Class I areas. Most importantly, the IMPROVE program scientifically documents the visual air quality of wilderness areas and national parks. Program objectives include:

  • Establish current visibility and aerosol conditions in mandatory Class I areas,
  • Identify chemical species and emission sources responsible for existing anthropogenic visibility impairment,
  • Document long-term trends for assessing progress toward the national visibility goals,
  • Provide regional haze monitoring representing all visibility-protected federal Class I areas where practical, as required by the EPA's Regional Haze Rule.

6.2 New York's Monitoring Responsibilities

Section 51.308(d)(4)(iii) of the EPA's Regional Haze Rule requires the inclusion of procedures by which monitoring data and other information are used in determining the contribution of emissions from within the State to regional haze visibility impairment at mandatory Class I Federal areas both within and outside the State. MANE-VU and New York State accept the contribution assessment analysis completed by NESCAUM entitled, Contributions to Regional Haze in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic United States (Appendix A). New York State agrees that NESCAUM is providing appropriate technical information by using the IMPROVE program data and the VIEWS site. Information about the use of the default and alternative approaches to the calculation of baseline and natural background conditions can be found in Section 5 of this SIP.

New York, however, does not contain any Class I areas. Therefore, no monitoring plan is required to be submitted with this SIP under the EPA's Regional Haze Rule.

6.3 Monitoring Information for MANE-VU Class I Areas1

Although New York does not contain any Class I areas, this section provides a description and location for the IMPROVE monitors in the Class I areas to which New York contributes to regional haze.

6.3.1. Acadia National Park, Maine (Figures 6-1 and 6-2)

The IMPROVE monitor for the Acadia National Park (indicated as ACAD1) is located at Acadia National Park Headquarters in Maine at an elevation of 157 meters, a latitude of 44.38° and a longitude of -68.26°.

Monitoring Strategy

The ACAD1 site is considered to be adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Acadia National Park by the State of Maine and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. Maine routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure 6-1 - Locational Map of the Acadia National Park, the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, and the Roosevelt Campobello International Park

Map of Maine showing Acadia to the south, followed by Roosevelt/Campobello to the northeast and Moosehorn further to the north

Figure 6-2 - Detailed Map of Acadia National Park

Map of Acadia National Park off the coast of Maine

6.3.2 Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, Maine (Figures 6-1 and 6-3)

The haze data for Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (MOOS1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. The IMPROVE monitor for the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge is located near McConvey Road, about one mile northeast of the National Wildlife Refuge Baring Unit Headquarters in Maine at an elevation of 78 meters, a latitude of 45.13° and a longitude of -67.27°.

Monitoring Strategy

The State of Maine considers the MOOS1 site as the only current IMPROVE monitoring site in Maine adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. Maine routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

This monitor also represents the Roosevelt/Campobello International Park in New Brunswick, Canada.

6.3.3. Roosevelt/Campobello International Park, New Brunswick, Canada (Figure 6-3)

The haze data for Roosevelt/Campobello International Park is collected by the IMPROVE monitor (MOOS1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. The IMPROVE monitor for the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge is also the monitor for Roosevelt/Campobello International Park. The monitor is located near McConvey Road, about one mile northeast of the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Baring Unit Headquarters in Maine at an elevation of 78 meters, a latitude of 45.13° and a longitude of -67.27°.

Monitoring Strategy

The State of Maine considers the MOOS1 site as the only current IMPROVE monitoring site in Maine or Canada adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Roosevelt/Campobello International Park. No additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary. Maine routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure 6-3 - Detailed Map of the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Areas and the Roosevelt Campobello International Park

Map showing location of Roosevelt Campobello Park and Moosehorn Refuge in Maine

6.3.4. Brigantine Wilderness Area, New Jersey (Figures 6-4 and 6-5)

The haze data for Brigantine Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (BRIG1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. The IMPROVE monitor for the Brigantine Wilderness Area is located at the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge Headquarters in Oceanville, New Jersey at an elevation of 5 meters, a latitude of 39.47° and a longitude of -74.45°.

Monitoring Strategy

The State of New Jersey considers the BRIG1 site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Brigantine Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. New Jersey routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure 6-4 - Locational Map of the Brigantine Wilderness Area

Map showing location of Brigantine Wilderness Area along New Jersey coast

Figure 6-5 - Detailed Map of the Brigantine Wilderness Area

Map of Brigantine Wilderness Area just north of Atlantic City, NJ

6.3.5 Great Gulf Wilderness Area, New Hampshire (Figures 6-6 and 6-7)

The haze data for Great Gulf Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (GRGU1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Forest Service. The IMPROVE monitor for the Great Gulf Wilderness Area is located at Camp Dodge, which is located in the mid northern area of Greens Grant, just east and south of where Route 16 crosses the Greens Grant/Martins Location boundary in the White Mountain National Forest, South of Gorham, New Hampshire, at an elevation of 454 meters, a latitude of 44.31° and a longitude of -71.22°.

Monitoring Strategy

The State of New Hampshire considers the GRGU1 site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Great Gulf Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. New Hampshire routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

This monitor also represents the Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area in New Hampshire.

6.3.6 Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area, New Hampshire (Figures 6-6 and 6-7)

The haze data for Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (GRGU1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Forest Service. The IMPROVE monitor for the Great Gulf Wilderness Area also represents the Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area. The Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area monitor is located at Camp Dodge, White Mountain National Forest, South of Gorham, New Hampshire, at an elevation of 454 meters, a latitude of 44.31° and a longitude of -71.22°.

Monitoring Strategy

The State of New Hampshire considers the GRGU1 site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Presidential Range/Dry River Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary. New Hampshire routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure 6-6 - Locational Map of the Great Gulf Wilderness and Presidential Range Dry River Areas

Map showing location of Great Gulf and Presidential Range areas in northern New Hampshire

Figure 6-7 - Detailed Map of the Great Gulf Wilderness and Presidential Range Dry River Areas

Map showing Great Gulf and Presidential Range areas in NH

6.3.7 Lye Brook Wilderness, Vermont (Figures 6-8 and 6-9)

The haze data for Lye Brook Wilderness Area is collected by an IMPROVE monitor (LYBR1) that is operated and maintained by the U.S. Forest Service. The IMPROVE monitor for the Lye Brook Wilderness Area is located on Mount Equinox at the windmills in Manchester, Vermont. The monitor is not in the Wilderness Area but is located on a mountain peak across the valley to the west of the wilderness area. The Lye Brook Wilderness Area is at high elevation in the mountains and the IMPROVE site across the valley is at about the same height as the Wilderness Area at an elevation of 1015 meters, a latitude of 43.15° and a longitude of -73.13°.

Monitoring Strategy

The State of Vermont considers the LYBR1 site as adequate for assessing reasonable progress goals of the Lye Brook Wilderness Area and no additional monitoring sites or equipment are necessary at this time. Vermont routinely participates in the IMPROVE monitoring program by sending regional representatives to the IMPROVE meetings.

Figure 6-8 - Locational Map of the Lye Brook Wilderness Area

Location of Lye Brook Wilderness Area in southern Vermont

Figure 6-9 - Detailed Map of the Lye Brook Wilderness Area

Map showing Lye Brook Wilderness Area in Vermont

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1 All maps in this section are derived from maps found at: http://www.nationalatlas.gov/printable/fedlands.html#list