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The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has added a link to a translation service developed by Microsoft Inc., entitled Bing Translator, as a convenience to visitors to the DEC website who speak languages other than English.

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Tree and Shrub Descriptions for 2014

The Seedling Sale is closed for 2014.

Conifer Species

All species available in units of 25 for $20 or 100 for $42. Some offered in units of 250 (as noted). Minimum seedling height 6". See Nursery Stock Availability page for status of availability since some species sell out quickly.

Austrian Pine

Latin name: Pinus nigra
Height: 50 to 80 feet
Width: 20 to 40 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, well-drained soil.
Physical Description: Evergreen conifer tree. Dense pyramidal shape when young, becoming more open and flat-topped with age. Shiny dark green stiff needles, 3 inches to 5 inches long, sharp tipped, arranged in bundles of 2. Cones stiff, 2 to 3 inches long. Bark dark gray brown becoming deeply furrowed.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals.
Uses: Christmas trees, windbreak, pulp.
Interesting Facts: Native of Europe, popular for landscape planting because more tolerant of heavy soils and pollution than many native pines.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. European source. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42.

Pitch Pine

Latin name: Pinus rigida
Height: 40 to 60 feet
Width: 20 to 30 feet
Growth Rate: Medium to slow
Site Requirements: Full sun, well drained soil. Does well on dry rocky sites and in sterile sandy soils. Grows well in coastal areas and sand dunes.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree. Form rounded and conical when young, becoming open with age. On better sites can grow long straight trunk, and symmetrical shape. On sites with sterile or rocky soil, often gets very craggy and picturesque with age. Foliage yellowish- green, needles in bundles of three, 2 to 5 inches long. Cones reddish brown, 2 to 3 inches long, very stiff, with distinct spine on each cone scale. Cones persistent, sometimes remaining on tree for several years. Bark gray-brown, becoming rough and platy with age. Needles may sprout directly from bark, a unique trait that is part of pitch pine's fire adaptation.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals. Bark eaten by porcupines.
Uses: Primarily used for coastal planting and restoration of inland pine barrens such as the Albany Pine Bush. Formerly used as a source of pitch and turpentine. Rot-resistant wood once used for boatbuilding and railroad ties.
Interesting Facts: Highly fire-adapted, the key tree species in Northeastern coastal and inland pine barrens.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Minimum height 6". New York orchard. 25/$20, 100/$42.

Red Pine

red pine needles and cone
red pine needles and cone

Latin name: Pinus resinosa
Height: 50 to 80 feet
Width: 30 to 40 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, well drained soil. Does well on sterile sandy soils.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree. Form rounded and conical with dense foliage when young, becoming more open with age. Develops very long straight trunk, especially in plantations. Needles dark green, in bundles of two. Cone reddish- brown, 2 to 3 inches long, stiff with thickened scale tips. Attached directly to branches, persistent. Bark reddish, becoming gray, platy and flaking with age.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals. Bark eaten by porcupines.
Uses: Poles, Christmas trees, lumber, pulp.
Interesting Facts: One of the primary reforestation species during early to mid 20th century. Ability to grow in dry sandy soil led to widespread planting of red pine for reclamation of abandoned and ruined farmland. These pine plantations stabilized the soil and provided shelter for eventual regeneration of hardwoods. Long straight trunks of plantation trees made outstanding poles for telephone lines, log buildings and pole construction. Also widely planted around reservoirs for water quality protection.
Seedling size, source and cost: Three-year seedling. New York source. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42.

Scotch Pine

Latin name: Pinus sylvestris
Height: 30 to 60 feet
Width: 20 to 40 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, well drained soil.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree. Rounded conical form with dense foliage when young, growing more open with age. Foliage bluish-green. Needles in bundles of two, 1 ½ inches to 3 inches long, thick and twisted. Cones small and stiff, 1 to 2 inches long. Bark red-brown, scaly when young, becoming grayer and furrowed with age. Older trees very distinctive because upper trunk and limbs are reddish and lower trunk is gray.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals. Bark eaten by porcupines.
Uses: Christmas trees, windbreak, pulp.
Interesting Facts: Has become one of the top Christmas tree species because of long-lasting needles and dense sturdy foliage.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. New York orchard; Boonville or Danish strain. Minimum height 6". $20/25, $42/100, $62/250 units.

White Pine

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Pinus strobus
Height: 60 to 100 feet
Width: 30 to 50 feet
Growth Rate: Medium to fast
Site Requirements: Sun, well drained soil.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree. Rounded conical shape with dense foliage when young, becoming more open with age. Straight long trunk. Foliage bluefish-green, soft looking. Needles in bundles of five, very thin, 3 to 5 inches long. Cones narrow and flexible, 4 to 8 inches long with thick tipped scales. Bark dark gray-brown, smooth when young, becoming rough and furrowed with age.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites, especially for larger birds. Height and open branches on old trees make white pine a prime species for large raptor nests. Large diameter of trunk especially valuable as nest site for pileated woodpeckers. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals. Bark eaten by porcupines.
Uses: Lumber, pulp, poles, windbreak. Used for furniture, paneling and boat planking. Soft white wood is prized by carvers because it cuts and sands cleanly without any fuzzing.
Interesting Facts: In colonial times, tall straight white pines marked by British as king's pines to reserve them for use as masts by royal navy ships. Tallest-growing tree species in Northeast growing to 120 feet tall and with trunks up to 4 feet in diameter. Most valuable timber species in historic times, used for almost every purpose.
Seedling size, source and cost: Three-year seedling. New York source. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42, 250/$62. SOLD OUT

Norway Spruce

Norway spruce forest
Norway spruce forest

Latin name: Picea abies
Height: 60 to 100 feet.
Width: 30 to 50 feet
Growth Rate: Fast to medium.
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade. Moist, well drained soil. Tolerates very wide range of soil types.
Physical Description: Evergreen conifer. Conical shape, older trees with long upswept branches. Dark green needles, ¾ inch to 1 inch long, four sided with sharp tip. Leaf scar is a raised woody peg. Cone red-brown, very large, 6 inches to 8 inches long with thin stiff scales. Bark gray-brown, smooth when young, becoming rough and platy with age.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals.
Uses: Lumber, windbreak, Christmas trees, pulp. Soft, light wood is valued for soundboards of musical instruments.
Interesting Facts: Big outdoor Christmas trees, such as those at Rockefeller Center, are often Norway spruce. Grows very large, and is most widely planted spruce for windbreaks and plantations.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two or three-year seedling. New York source. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42, 250/$68.

White Spruce

Latin name: Picea glauca
Height: 40 to 60 feet
Width: 15 to 20 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, well drained soil. Hardy to zone 2. Does not like shade.
Physical Description: Evergreen conifer tree. . Full pyramidal shape when young, growing to tall narrow conical form. Foliage dull blue-green. Sharp-tipped, four-sided needles ½ inch to ¾ inch long, pointing upward. Cones brown with wavy scales, 1 ½ inches to 2 inches long. Bark brown to grayish brown, becoming rough and flaky.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals.
Uses: Lumber, windbreak, pulp, Christmas trees.
Interesting Facts: Inner bark is silvery white, hence the name white spruce.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. New York source. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42, 250/$68.

Balsam Fir

SOLD OUT
Latin name:
Abies balsamea
Height: 40 to 70 feet
Width: 20 to 30 feet
Growth Rate: Slow
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade, moist well drained soil. Prefers cool conditions.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree. Conical shape with narrow crown. Needles ¾ inch long, dark green, with rounded ends, very fragrant. Leaf scar round and flat. Cones upright, 2 to 3 inches long, disintegrate on tree leaving persistent central spike. Bark gray-brown, smooth with
blisters filled with fragrant resin.
Wildlife Value: wildlife cover, foliage and buds eaten by deer, seeds eaten by birds and squirrels.
Uses: Christmas trees, wreaths, pulpwood and lumber.
Interesting Facts: Traditional Christmas tree species long prized for its wonderful fragrance. Resin from bark, known as Canada Balsam, formerly used as optical adhesive for glass lenses and microscope slides.
Seedling size, source and cost: 3-year-old seedling. New York source. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42. SOLD OUT.

Douglas Fir

Latin name: Pseudotsuga menziesii
Height: 40 to 80 feet
Width: 20 to 40 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade. Moist well drained soil.
Physical Description: Evergreen conifer tree. Dense foliage when young, becoming tall open and conical with age. Foliage often grayish green to blue-green, needles 1 inch to 1 ½ inch long. Cones oval, light brown, 3 to 4 inches long, with long tongue-like bracts hanging out between the scales.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by birds and rodents.
Uses: Christmas trees , lumber, pulp. Popular as Christmas tree because of long-lasting attractive foliage.
Interesting Facts: Native to western U.S., grows very tall and large in coastal forests and is major timber species in Pacific Northwest, and in the Rocky Mountains.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two or three-year seedling. Lincoln source. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42.

Japanese Larch

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Larix kaempferi
Height: 70 to 90 feet
Width: 25 to 40 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil. Hardy to zone 4.
Physical Description: Deciduous conifer tree. Conical open habit with soft blue-green foliage. Turns yellow in fall, then drops needles. Soft flexible needles 1 to 1 ½ inches long, bright to dark green, arranged in whorls of 40 or more on short woody spurs. Twigs brown, usually with hairs. Cones stiff, oval, 1 to 1 ½ inches long with scales turned upward, giving effect of a rosette. Bark thin and grayish brown, becoming rough and furrowed with age.
Wildlife Value: Seeds eaten by birds and rodents. Provides cover and nest sites for birds.
Uses: Lumber, pulp. Strong heavy rot-resistant wood used for construction, poles, railroad ties.
Interesting Facts: Grows faster than European larch and is slightly more heat tolerant. The rose-shaped cones and blue-green foliage are the easiest way to distinguish it from European larch.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. New York orchard. Minimum height 6". 25/$20, 100/$42. SOLD OUT

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Hardwood Species

Order in units of 25, 100 or 250 depending on species. Height: 5" - 14". New York source when available.

See Nursery Stock Availability page for status of availability since some species sell out quickly.

Black Locust

SOLD OUT
Latin name:
Robinia pseudoacacia
Height: 50 to 80 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Able to grow in very poor soils
Physical Description: Deciduous tree with 6-14"-long pinately compound leaves. with thick, deeply furrowed blackish bark. Leaflet is 1-2" long and ¾" wide and elliptic, blue/green above and paler underneath. Autumn color yellow. ¼-1/2" spines on branches in pairs at each leaf node. A member of the pea family. 4-8" long white very fragrant flower clusters in late spring to early summer. Honey- or vanilla-like scent. 2-4" long brown papery, flattened seed pods persist into spring. ¼" kidney-shaped seeds. Early colonizer of disturbed areas. Native to the Appalacian mountains.but has spread far beyond. It spreads by underground shoots.
Uses: Because of the hard, rot-resistant wood, grown for fence posts and occasionally other wood products. The lumber is one of the heaviest and hardest in North America. Widely used for erosion control and reforestation, black locust is ideally suited for woody biomass plantings, and commercial energy production may eventually become one of its primary uses in the U.S. Its virtues include nitrogen fixing ability, inexpensive propagation by seed, rapid vegetative propagation, adaptability to a wide range of site conditions, rapid juvenile growth, high heat content of the wood, and prolific regrowth after cutting survives droughts and severe winters, tolerates infertile and acidic soils. Popular as a street tree. Black locust is highly valued as firewood for wood-burning stoves; it burns slowly, with little visible flame or smoke, and has a higher heat content than any other species that grows widely in the Eastern United. States Black locust is a major honey plant in the eastern US, and, having been taken and planted in France, is the source of the renowned acacia monofloral honey from France.
Interesting Facts: Only native nitrogen-fixing tree in NY. Locust leaves droop and fold up at night and in cloudy weather.
Note: Black locust, because of its fast growth habit and adaptability, is considered a weedy and invasive tree. It should not be planted in or near pine barren or pine bush habitats.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$20, 100/$42, 250/$62. SOLD OUT

Black Walnut

Latin name: Juglans nigra
Height: 40 to 80 feet
Width: 30 to 60 feet
Growth Rate: Medium fast
Site Requirements: sun, deep moist well drained soil
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Often has rather short trunk and open spreading branches. Compound leaves, 12 to 24 inches long with 10 to 24 narrow leaflets. Terminal leaflet often absent. Nuts almost round, about 1 inch long covered with thick husk. Unripe nuts have green husk and are perfectly round 1 ½ inch spheres. Husk turns brown and begins to disintegrate when nuts are ripe. Bark dark brown with narrow ridges.
Wildlife Value: Rich oily nutmeats are high calorie food for squirrels who open the nuts, and also for birds who clean out the shells.
Uses: Primary use is lumber from the valuable dark brown heartwood. Prized for furniture. Nuts are used for baking. Nut husks were once an important source of brown dye. Ripe nut husks will stain hands.
Interesting Facts: Spreads very readily where there are nut-bearing trees, because squirrels bury so many of the nuts.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30, 100/$66

Butternut, also known as white walnut

Latin name: Juglans cinerea
Height: 40 to 60 feet
Width: 20 to 35 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: sun, deep moist well drained soil
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Rather open branching habit. Large compound leaves, 15 to 25 inches long, with 7 to 17 oval leaflets. Has single terminal leaflet. Nuts oblong, 1 to 1 ½ inches long with very rough ridged shell with a thick husk. Nutmeat is sweet and oily. Bark lightish gray with distinctive diamond shaped ridges.
Wildlife Value: The very rich nutmeat is valuable food for wildlife. Many birds will clean out nuts originally opened by squirrels.
Uses: Rich sweet nuts used for baking. Lumber light golden brown, takes very fine finish, used for cabinetry and paneling.
Interesting Facts: Can be distinguished from the very similar black walnut by leaves with fewer wider leaflets, oval husks and differences in the leaf scars.
Note: Butternut is susceptible to butternut canker, a disease caused by the fungus Sirococcus clavigignenti-juglandacearum. Although butternut has almost disappeared in some states, it is still an important component of New York's forests. Some trees have shown some resistance to the disease and efforts are underway to develop resistant strains of butternut. It is important to keep planting butternut in order to save this beautiful species. The more seedlings which are planted, the better the chances of finding resistant individuals. For more information on butternut canker, please see the link in the Links Leaving DEC's Website at the top, right-hand side of this page.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30, 100/$66

Buckeye

Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30, 100/$66

River Birch

Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30 SOLD OUT

Black Cherry

SOLD OUT
Latin name:
Prunus serotina
Height: 40 to 80 feet
Width: 20 to 40 feet
Growth Rate: Fast to medium
Site Requirements: Full sun, deep, moist well drained soil. On good sites black cherry can grow very large, with a long straight trunk.
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Dense pyramidal form when young, developing more drooping branches with age. Leaves shiny, finely toothed, oval shaped with pointed tip. Fall color often in shades of reds and oranges. Small white flowers in narrow, hanging clusters followed by small reddish black, sweet berries. Bark on young trees smooth shiny dark gray brown with prominent horizontal lenticels. Older bark very distinctive blackish flakes resembling burnt potato chips.
Wildlife Value: Stems browsed by deer and rabbits. Fruit eaten by many birds and mammals.
Uses: Heartwood is beautiful reddish brown color, hard and strong. Used for furniture, veneer and dimensional lumber.
Interesting Facts: One of our most valuable hardwoods and prized since colonial times for fine furniture.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5-14". 25/$30 SOLD OUT

Hybrid Poplar

Latin name: Populus deltoides x Populus sp. (Eastern cottonwood crosses with other poplar species)
Height: 40 to 80 feet
Width: 30 to 50 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil. The cottonwood parent is a riparian species and grows in floodplain areas.
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Upright, somewhat spreading habit. Leaves large rounded triangle shape like cottonwood, 2 to 5 inches long. Bark variable, usually light gray brown.
Wildlife Value: Shoots and leaves provide browse for deer and rabbits. Cover and nest sites for birds. Soft wood on old trees is easily excavated by woodpeckers for nest cavities.
Uses: Pulp, biofuel, windbreaks
Interesting Facts: Extremely fast growing, and can be coppiced for fuel crops.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30, 100/$56

Silver Maple

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Acer saccharinum
Height: 50 to 75 feet
Width: 40 to 60 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil, but can withstand periodic flooding. Very tolerant of a wide range of site conditions.
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Rounded conical form when young, becoming more open with age. Typically develops short massive trunk with long heavy main branches. Younger branches rather slender and flexible, may sweep upward at ends. Distinctive in winter because of clumps of round flower buds on ends of branches. Leaves 2 to 5 inches wide, 3 to 5 lobes, very deeply lobed with coarse teeth, leaf backs silvery-white. Fall color is light yellow. Samaras wide v-shaped, up to 2 ½ inches wide. Bark smooth, light gray on young trees. Becomes shaggy and furrowed on older trees.
Wildlife Value: Deer browse, seeds and buds eaten by squirrels.
Uses: Riparian restoration. Fast-growing shade tree for large urban spaces, brownfield sites and floodplains. Was widely planted as street tree because of fast growth and tolerance of urban conditions, but proved to be too large for most streets, also brittle in ice storms. With an adequate space well away from power lines, it can still be a fine urban tree if it is properly pruned when young to encourage strong branching structure.
Interesting Facts: Largest seeds of any native maple. Unique lacy foliage and long sweeping branches.
Seedling size and cost: Height: 5"-14". 25/$30, 100/$66 SOLD OUT

Sugar Maple

SOLD OUT
Latin name:
Acer saccharum
Height: 50 to 75 feet
Width: 30 to 45 feet
Growth Rate: Slow
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade; prefers deep, moist, well drained soil. For best growth, avoid dry hot sites and very wet sites.
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Conical to round crown; dense foliage. Leaves are 3 to 6 inches, opposite, simple leaf with 3 to 5 lobes. Fall color: yellow,orange,and red tones, the widest color range of any tree. Small greenish yellow flowers in early spring. Fruit is a two-winged horseshoe shaped samara. Bark is variable, but usually grayish brown. May be furrowed on older trees.
Wildlife Value: Deer browse the branches. Squirrels feed on the seeds, buds, twigs, and foliage. Birds nest in trees.
Uses: The sap is the principal source of maple sugar. The wood is used for flooring, furniture, and veneer.
Interesting Facts: Sugar maple is the New York State tree. The wood sometimes has unique patterns such as a "birdseye" or "curly" figures making the wood highly prized. Although it has more specific site requirements than many other maple species, sugar maple is one of our most valuable trees for its superb fall color, maple syrup production, and fine lumber.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30, 100/$66 SOLD OUT

Red Oak

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Quercus rubra
Height: 60 to 80 feet
Width: 40 to 50 feet
Growth Rate: Medium to fast
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil. Grows well on upland sites. most cold-tolerant oak species, hardy to zone 4.
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Dense foliage, pyramidal form when young, developing long straight trunk in forest conditions, and shorter thick trunk in open situations. Rounded crown, usually more symmetrical than white oak. Leaves glossy, 5 to 8 inches long with lobes ending in sharp points. Fall color ranges from vivid red to russet brown. Big acorns, about 1 inch long, with very shallow caps like little berets. Ripen in two years, bitter taste. Bark smooth when young, becoming ridged with age.
Wildlife Value: Foliage browsed by deer. Acorns a major food source for wildlife species, especially deer, bear, turkeys, squirrels and many birds, especially jays and woodpeckers.
Uses: Very strong heavy, reddish wood, used for beams, framing, flooring and furniture. Tolerant of urban conditions and does well in larger areas like parks.
Interesting Facts: Unusually fast growing for an oak.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30, 100/$66 SOLD OUT

White Oak

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Quercus alba
Height: 50 to 80 feet
Width: 40 to 60 feet
Growth Rate: Slow to medium
Site Requirements: Sun, well drained soil. Quite drought tolerant, will grow on dry rocky sites.
Physical Description: Deciduous tree. Dense foliage, pyramidal form when young. Open grown trees tend to develop short massive trunks and wide irregular crowns, often very picturesque. Forest-gown trees have longer trunks and narrower crowns. Leaves 4 to 8 inches long with rounded lobes, often finger shaped. Fall color wine red to pinkish brown. Acorns, small and sweet, maturing in one year. Bark is light gray brown, flaky on younger trees, becoming platy or blocky on old trees.
Wildlife Value: Acorns valuable food for turkey, deer, squirrels, jays and many other species.
Uses: Lumber is extremely strong and hard. Was widely used for barrels because tyloses in wood make it water tight and resistant to rot. Used for beams, railroad ties, flooring and furniture. Prized for framing timbers in wooden boats.
Interesting Facts: Quartersawn white oak, with its distinctive grain and dimensional stability was the primary wood used by Stickley and other makers of Mission style furniture. The iconic leaf shape of white oak is often used for logos and symbols.
Seedling size and cost: Height 5"-14". 25/$30 SOLD OUT

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Wildlife Habitat Shrubs/Small Trees

Order 25 for $20 and 100 for $42 except as noted. Height 4" - 12". New York source. See Nursery Stock Availability page for status of availability since some species sell out quickly.

Bayberry

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Morella pensylvanica, formerly Myrica pensylvanica
Height: 5 to 10 feet
Width: 5-10 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade, moist, well drained soil. tolerant of a wide range of soil types, but as one of the few shrubs which can fix nitrogen, grows well on even the poorest sandy soils. Extremely salt tolerant. Hardy in Saratoga.
Physical Description: A remarkably versatile shrub, bayberry is equally at home in Long Island sand dunes and in wooded inland fens. This sun-loving shrub is tolerant of a wide range of soil types, but as one of the few shrubs which can fix nitrogen, it can grow well on even the poorest sandy soils. In warmer zones it is often evergreen, holding its aromatic leathery green leaves all winter. Deciduous (sometimes evergreen) spreading shrub. Multi-stemmed with dense foliage, rounded form. Leaves glossy, fragrant, 2 to 4 inches long, narrow oval with teeth near the tip. Leaves are alternate along the stem, often clustered densely at branch tips. Female plants have 1/8 inch waxy gray berries on lower stems.
Wildlife Value: The berries are held well into winter and are eaten by many bird species
Uses: Bayberry makes a fine urban or roadside shrub because of its high salt tolerance and its resistance to insects and diseases. It can be pruned as a hedge or allowed to spread as a low maintenance ground cover shrub.
Interesting Facts: The leaves make great potpourri, and the waxy gray berries are the source of fragrant bayberry candles.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20 only.

Bristly Locust

SOLD OUT

Seedling size, source and cost: One-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Buttonbush

Latin name: Cephalanthus occidentalis
Height: 5 to 10 feet
Width: 4 to 8 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, moist to wet soil. Will grow on well drained sites with adequate moisture. Often found in cattail marshes and pond shorelines.
Physical Description: Deciduous shrub. Often multi-stemmed, but may have single trunk. May sometimes show distinctive right angle branching. Habit ranges from rounded, dense shrub to open irregular habit in the wild. Leaves opposite, 3 to 4 inches long, rather leathery, smooth margin.
Wonderful snowball-like spheres of tiny white fragrant flowers about 1 inch in diameter. Decorative round green seedheads on long stems turn brown when ripe. Bark smooth on young plants, developing flaking texture.
Wildlife Value: Nectar plant for butterflies and hummingbirds. Seeds eaten by many birds.
Uses: Riparian restoration, rain gardens, wildlife habitat and butterfly gardens
Interesting Facts: Attractive flaking bark, unusual branching, and the round seedheads make buttonbush striking even in winter. Truly unique in bloom.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height. 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20 only.

Eastern Red Cedar

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Juniperus virginiana
Height: 10 to 40 feet
Width: 6 to 20 feet
Growth Rate: Slow
Site Requirements: Full sun, well drained soil. Often found on dry ridges and rock outcrops. Does well on limestone soils as well as more acid soils. Although highly drought resistant, it will make better growth in well drained, deep soils - as long as it has full sun.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree with dense foliage. Very fragrant. Narrow habit when young, becoming more spreading and conical with age.Has two types of foliage, juvenile and adult. Juvenile foliage (found on seedlings and young trees): bluefish-green needles ¼ inch long, with sharp ends. Adult foliage: smooth, dark olive green, 1/16 long, scale-like needles held close to twigs. Separate male and female trees. Males have tiny yellowish pollen cones. Females produce berry-like, blue cones about 1/8 to ¼ inch in diameter. Bark thin, red-brown and gray, shredding in strips.
Wildlife Value: Berries are important food for many birds. Dense foliage provides good cover for many species. Foliage browsed by deer.
Uses: Wildlife, reclamation planting on dry sites. Aromatic red heartwood is used to line cedar closets. Wood is very rot-resistant, but uses limited due to small size. Used for rough, but long-lasting, fence posts.
Interesting Facts: Traditional wood for cedar pencils.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Gray Dogwood

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Cornus racemosa
Height: 4 to 10 feet
Width: 4 to 10 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun to light shade, well drained to moist soils. Quite drought tolerant.
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. Upright habit, stems not sprawling. Spreads by root suckers, will form a smoothly rounded mound. Thin red-brown to gray twigs. Opposite leaves, oval to elliptical shape, 2 ½ inches long, medium green. Clusters of small white flowers followed by white berries on bright red-pink stems. Bark light gray, smooth in younger plants, becoming rougher with age. Leaves turn a distinctive purplish-burgundy color in fall, which contrasts nicely with the white berries held on conspicuous hot pink stems.
Wildlife Value: Berries are a bird magnet, flowers attract butterflies.
Uses: Soil stabilization, windbreaks, fencerows.
Interesting Facts: Gray dogwood, once considered a bit of a weed for its ability to spread in disturbed areas, is one of the few native shrubs that can persist along roadsides invaded by buckthorn and shrub honeysuckle. In the wild, gray dogwood grows on a remarkably wide range of sites, from wetland edges to extremely dry rocky areas. Tough as nails.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20 only. SOLD OUT

Highbush Cranberry

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Viburnum opulus
Height: 8 to 12 feet
Width: 8 to 12 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil
Physical Description: Deciduous shrub. Upright growth habit. Leaves opposite, 3 lobed, 2 to 4 inches long. Fall color shades of red. White flowers in flat topped clusters, followed by bright red berries.
Wildlife Value: Berries a top favorite of many birds.
Uses: Hedges, windbreaks, riparian planting, wildlife habitat
Interesting Facts: Not a true cranberry. There are two subspecies of highbush cranberry, one European and one American, both equally attractive to birds.
Seedling size, source and cost: One-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42 SOLD OUT

Northern White Cedar, also known as Arborvitae

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Thuja occidentalis
Height: 20 to 60 feet
Width: 10 to 30 feet
Growth Rate: Medium to slow
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade, moist well drained soil. Does well on limestone, also grows in wet soil.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree. Form rounded, narrow to conical when young, with dense foliage. Older trees develop tapered crowns and straight long trunks in forest conditions. Frequently grown in hedges and may appear multi-stemmed because of very low branched trunk. Foliage shiny, dark green, flattened sprays of twigs with tiny smooth scale-like needles. Cones about ½ inch long, brown with only a few scales. Bark gray and finely furrowed.
Wildlife Value: Excellent cover for many species because of dense foliage. Widely used as winter deer browse.
Uses: Hedges, screens, windbreaks, lumber. Wood is very light, rot-resistant and fairly strong.
Interesting Facts: Wood prized for planking small boats because of light weight. The famous 19th century Rushton canoes, built in upstate New York, were planked with white cedar. Most famous Rushton canoe 'Sairy Gamp', was 10 ½ feet long and weighed less than 10 pounds.
Seedling size, source and cost: Three-year seedling. Height 4"-12". 25/$20 only.

Prairie Willow

Size, source and cost: One-year rooted cuttings. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Pussy Willow

Latin name: Salix discolor
Height: 6 to 15 feet
Width: 4 to 10 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil. Will grow in wetlands.
Physical Description: Deciduous shrub. Can be grown as multi-stemmed shrub or as small single-trunked tree. Tree form branches shorter angular, foliage usually smaller. Very variable. Leaves alternate, elliptical, 2 to 4 inches long, light green to bluish green above, white below. Flower buds are gray and silky, later open into male or female catkins. Multi-stemmed shrub can be maintained by coppicing to get long shoots and lots of flower buds.
Wildlife Value: important browse species for many animals and birds. Willow buds, leaves twigs and bark provide food year around.
Uses: streambank stabilization, rain gardens, flower production for floral arrangements, bioengineering structures, riparian protection.
Interesting facts: Willow bark contains salicylic acid original source of aspirin. Used by native Americans as pain killer.
Size, source and cost: One-year rooted cuttings. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Red Osier Dogwood "Ruby"

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Cornus sericea
Height: 6 to 9 feet
Width: 6 to 9 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade. Moist, well drained soil to seasonally wet soils. Will grow in wetlands.
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. Multi-stemmed, growing in wide mound, spreads by rooting stems. Bright red twigs and younger branches. Leaves opposite, oval, 1 ½ to 3 inches long. Clusters of small white flowers, followed by white berries. Bark smooth and red, becoming gray and slightly furrowed on older stems.
Wildlife Value: Flowers draw butterflies, berries eaten by many birds, stems and leaves browsed by deer and small mammals
Uses: Soil stabilization, wildlife planting, hedges, windbreaks, basketry.
Interesting Facts: "Ruby" is a Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) introduction propagated from a plant found growing in Painted Post NY. This is propogated by cuttings which essentially are clones of the original plant. They will be consistent in physical characteristics. This selection has exceptional stem-rooting (layering) ability for use in stream bank stabilization and soil bioengineering. Can be repeatedly coppiced, either for production of rooting whips or to maintain it as a dense hedge.
Size, source and cost: Two-year rooted cuttings. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20. Only available in bundles of 25.

Red Stem Dogwood

Latin name: Cornus sericea, also known as red osier dogwood
Height: 6 to 9 feet
Width: 6 to 9 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade. Moist, well drained soil to seasonally wet soils. Will grow in wetlands.
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. Multi-stemmed, growing in wide mound , spreads by rooting stems. Bright red twigs and younger branches. Leaves opposite, oval, 1 ½ to 3 inches long. Clusters of small white flowers, followed by white berries. Bark smooth and red, becoming gray and slightly furrowed on older stems.
Wildlife Value: Flowers draw butterflies, berries eaten by many birds, stems and leaves browsed by deer and small mammals.|
Uses: Soil stabilization, wildlife planting, hedges, windbreaks, basketry.
Interesting Facts: To avoid confusion with the NRCS Red Osier Dogwood "Ruby", a named selection propagated by cuttings, the name red-stem dogwood is used here to describe Cornus sericea plants grown from seed from a variety of sources. Plants grown from seed have natural variation.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Rugosa Rose

Latin name: Rosa rugosa
Height: 3 to 7 feet
Width: 3 to 7 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun, well drained soil. Does well on sandy soils.
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. New stems usually green, very prickly. Leaves light green, shiny, have distinctive quilted texture. Flowers single, 2 inch, pink, occasionally white, with strong cinnamon-like fragrance. Will re-bloom. Large red hips, sometimes ½ diameter. Will spread by sending up new shoots from roots.
Wildlife Value: Hips excellent food for many birds, leaves and stems are browsed by deer and rabbits.
Uses: Much used along roads and in coastal areas because of salt tolerance and drought resistance. Very large hips are good source of vitamin C.
Interesting Facts: Originally from Japan, Rugosa rose has been widely planted because of its salt tolerance, disease resistance, and because it reblooms, unlike most species roses which only bloom once. In some areas it has become invasive, so check before you plant.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Sandbar Willow

Latin Name: Salix interior
Height: 3 - 10 feet
Width: 3 - 10 feet
Growth Rate: fast
Site Requirements: full sun, wet to moist soil, tolerates intermittent standing water
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. Very narrow, gray green leaves with widely spaced teeth. Fine textured, feathery foliage on slender tan stems. Vigorous spreading growth. Typically forms dense, multi-stemmed mounds of foliage. Bright yellow in fall.
Wildlife Value: Good cover for birds and animals, browse for deer, buds eaten by grouse.
Uses: Stream bank stabilization, bioengineering, green infrastructure, living fences
Interesting facts: Sandbar willow is excellent for stabilizing streambanks and for use in living fences, snow fences and bioengineered structures. Its narrow leaves give it a delicate feathery look, and it could be used in landscapes for almost a bamboo-like effect. It does spread, an advantage for shoreline stabilization, but something that should be planned for in more urban settings.
Size, source and cost: One-year rooted cuttings. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Silky Dogwood

Latin name: Cornus amomum ssp. amomum, also known as swamp dogwood
Height: 6 to 10 feet
Width: 6 to 10 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade, well drained to wet soils. Needs some moisture, is not highly drought tolerant.
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. Multi-stemmed shrub with dense foliage and rounded form. New stems reddish purple with fine silky hair. Flexible stems will root where they are in contact with the ground. Leaves opposite, oval with sharp tip, 2 to 4 inches long. Clusters of small white flowers in spring, followed by blue berries which ripen to black. Young bark smooth, greenish or brown, becoming brown, slightly furrowed .
Wildlife Value: Flowers attract butterflies. Fruit eaten by many birds. Leaves and twigs browsed by deer, rabbits.
Uses: Riparian restoration, stream bank stabilization, windbreaks.
Interesting Facts: One of the more shade tolerant shrubs for moist soil. Much used for restoration and stabilization because of ability to readily root from stems.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Streamco Willow

Latin name: Salix purpurea "Streamco," also known as purpleosier willow
Height: 10 to 15 feet
Width: 10 to 15 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil.
Physical Description: Deciduous shrub. Upright clumping habit, forms long stems, especially when coppiced. Young stems purplish to reddish brown. Leaves alternate, but often appear to be opposite. Narrow leaves 2 to 4 inches long, bluish green with silvery white undersides.
Wildlife Value: important browse species for many animals and birds. Willow buds, leaves twigs and bark provide food year around.
Uses: Streambank stabilization, rain gardens, bioengineering structures, riparian protection. Also used for basket-making, rustic furniture, living structures.
Interesting facts: A variety of European basket willow that will produce long flexible shoots when coppiced. During late 19th early 20th century, willow basket making was a major industry in central NY.
Size, source and cost: One-year rooted cuttings. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Toringo Crabapple

Latin name: Malus seiboldii
Height: 10 to 15 feet
Width: 10 to 15 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil.
Physical Description: Deciduous small tree. Rounded habit with dense foliage. Fragrant white flowers, followed by ½ inch yellow to red fruit.
Wildlife Value: This crabapple species is especially valuable for wildlife, since it holds its fruit well into February when few other foods are available. It is a better choice than wild apple in many situations, since the shoots and bark are not severely browsed by deer.
Uses: Wildlife, hedges.
Interesting Facts: Although this species is native to Asia, it is often recommended in preference to native crabapples because of its superior disease resistance. Native crabapples are extremely susceptible to several major diseases, notably cedar-apple rust.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Virginia Rose

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Rosa virginiana
Height: 4 to 6 feet
Width: 2 to 6 feet
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Sun, moist well drained soil. Does well in sandy soils, tolerant of salt spray.
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. New canes dark red, paired slightly curved thorns. Leaves dark green and shiny with distinctive broad "wings" or stipules at the base of the stem. Flowers large, pink, single, about 1 ½ to 2 inches across. Blooms in late spring- early summer. Smooth red hips.
Wildlife Value: Hips excellent food for many birds, leaves and stems are browsed by deer and rabbits.
Uses: Soil and dune stabilization, roadside and beach planting, wildlife cover and food, hedges.
Interesting Facts: Can be used as native replacement for rugosa rose because of similar site preferences.
Size, source and cost: One-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20 only. Sold Out

Wetland Rose

Latin name: Rosa palustris
Height: 4 to 7 feet
Width: 2 to 4 feet
Growth Rate: Medium
Site Requirements: Sun, wet to well drained soils. Often found growing with other wetland shrubs such as buttonbush and red osier dogwood in cattail marshes or along stream banks. Will also grow well on non-wetland sites, but does not like drought.
Physical Description: Deciduous spreading shrub. Upright, often narrow shrub with rounded top. New stems red, with slightly hooked thorns in pairs. Older stems often show lengthwise striping of light and dark brown bark. Leaves can be distinguished from those of other roses by the very narrow stipules at the base of each leaf stem. Leaflets often distinctly toothed, soft to glossy looking. Fall color: wines, reds, oranges and yellows. Blooms in late spring- early summer.Fragrant, pink 5 petaled flowers followed by 3/8 inch red hips with soft prickles.
Wildlife Value: Hips excellent food for many birds, leaves and stems are browsed by deer and rabbits.
Uses: Riparian planting, wetlands, hedges.
Interesting Facts: Although species can grow fairly large and will spread into extensive colonies in wetlands, it does not form impassable tangles like the invasive multiflora rose.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Wild grape

SOLD OUT

Latin name: Vitis riparia, also known as river grape, riverbank grape
Height: 40 to 70 feet
Width: Variable
Growth Rate: Fast
Site Requirements: Moist well drained soil. Although wild grape is a riparian species, it grows on a remarkably wide range of sites, thriving even in blighted industrial areas. Fairly drought tolerant, probably the most cold-hardy woody vine.
Physical Description: Deciduous woody vine. Long stems with attractive reddish-brown shredding bark. Young shoots light green, climbing with large forked tendrils, which coil strongly around supports. Leaves 2 to 6 inches long, light green, thin, shining, usually three lobed. Leaf form variable; some leaves may be very deeply lobed and toothed. Fruit tight clumps of dark blue to black grapes, about ¼ inch in diameter.
Wildlife Value: Berries are winter food for many bird and animal species, the bark is used by birds for nest material, and the vines are preferred nest sites for species such as cardinals. It is one of the most valuable species for wildlife, not only because of the fruit, but also because the swinging vine stems provide nest sites safe from the majority of predators.
Uses: Tough, hardy and fast-growing, it can be used to cover fences and shade structures. It climbs with strong coiling tendrils and can be grown on wall trellises as green walls to help cool buildings. It can grow tall enough to shade sides of multi-story buildings and is recommended as a native substitute for invasive wisteria vines. Although wild grape has a reputation for being aggressive, regular pruning makes it a beautiful asset for shading a house or covering a fence. Plus, grapevine prunings make excellent wreaths and decorations.
Interesting Facts: The fruit is very tart when it first ripens and makes excellent preserves. After a hard frost the berries become very sweet. A magnificent and under-rated vine that has tremendous potential for green infrastructure, particularly for cooling and air quality improvement.
Note: Do not allow any vines to climb up trees. Encourage them to climb trellises, fences, buildings and other supports where they can provide shade and other benefits while getting the light that they want.
Seedling size, source and cost: Two-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

Winged Sumac

Seedling size, source and cost: One-year seedling. Height 4"-12". New York source. 25/$20, 100/$42

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Mixed Species Packets

  • Wildlife Habitat Packet #1 - $42.00 Contains 30 each of the following: Highbush Cranberry, Red Stem Dogwood, Toringo Crabapple. (90 plants)
  • Wildlife Habitat Packet #2 - $25.00 Contains 10 each of the following: Highbush Cranberry, Silky Dogwood, Toringo Crabapple. (30 plants)
  • Long Island Shore Packet #3A - $25.00 Contains 10 each of the following: Bayberry, Virginia Rose, Winged Sumac. (30 plants)
  • Riparian Packet #4 - $60.00 Contains 20 each of the following: Hybrid Poplar, Pussy Willow, Red Oak, Red Stem Dogwood, White Spruce. (100 plants)
  • Ruffed Grouse Packet #6 - $42.00 Contains 10 each of the following: American Hazelnut, Hybrid Poplar, Red Stem Dogwood, Toringo Crabapple and White Spruce. (50 plants).

The Nursery reserves the right to make substitutions in any wildlife packet using a species suitable for the area to be planted.

Containerized Stock

Two-year greenhouse plugs. New York source. 50 for $35. All in very limited supply.

Balsam Fir

SOLD OUT
Latin name:
Abies balsamea
Height: 40 to 70 feet
Width: 20 to 30 feet
Growth Rate: Slow
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade, moist well drained soil. Prefers cool conditions.
Physical Description: Evergreen tree. Conical shape with narrow crown. Needles ¾ inch long, dark green, with rounded ends, very fragrant. Leaf scar round and flat. Cones upright, 2 to 3 inches long, disintegrate on tree leaving persistent central spike. Bark gray-brown, smooth with
blisters filled with fragrant resin.
Wildlife Value: wildlife cover, foliage and buds eaten by deer, seeds eaten by birds and squirrels.
Uses: Christmas trees, wreaths, pulpwood and lumber.
Interesting Facts: Traditional Christmas tree species long prized for its wonderful fragrance. Resin from bark, known as Canada Balsam, formerly used as optical adhesive for glass lenses and microscope slides.
Seedling cost: 50/$35. Sold Out

Norway Spruce

Latin name: Picea abies
Height: 60 to 100 feet.
Width: 30 to 50 feet
Growth Rate: Fast to medium.
Site Requirements: Sun to partial shade. Moist, well drained soil. Tolerates very wide range of soil types.
Physical Description: Evergreen conifer. Conical shape, older trees with long upswept branches. Dark green needles, ¾ inch to 1 inch long, four sided with sharp tip. Leaf scar is a raised woody peg. Cone red-brown, very large, 6 inches to 8 inches long with thin stiff scales. Bark gray-brown, smooth when young, becoming rough and platy with age.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites. Seeds eaten by many birds and small mammals.
Uses: Lumber, windbreak, Christmas trees, pulp. Soft, light wood is valued for soundboards of musical instruments.
Interesting Facts: Big outdoor Christmas trees, such as those at Rockefeller Center, are often Norway spruce. Grows very large, and is most widely planted spruce for windbreaks and plantations.
Seedling cost: 50/$35

Meyer Spruce

SOLD OUT
Latin name:
Picea meyeri
Height: 40 feet.
Width: 30 feet
Growth Rate: slow to medium.
Site Requirements: Full sun, can tolerate partial shade. It is considered to be drought-tolerant, and thus makes an ideal choice for xeriscaping or the moisture-conserving landscape. It is not particular as to soil type or pH, and is able to handle environmental salt. It is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments.
Physical Description: Evergreen conifer. Conical shape. Dark blue-green short needles. Virtually identical to Colorado blue spruce but is more disease and pest resistant. Excellent needle retention and dense growth.
Wildlife Value: Cover and nest sites.
Uses: Windbreaks, privacy screens, Christmas trees, ornamental landscape tree.
Seedling cost: 50/$35 SOLD OUT

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